Wurdz Flashcards Preview

Vocabulary > Wurdz > Flashcards

Flashcards in Wurdz Deck (1710):
1

Ply

To work hard with or at; employ busily or use

To carry on, practice or pursue busily or steadily

2

Dandy

A man excessively concerned about clothes and appearance

3

Wager

Bet

4

Dematerialize

Cease to have material character or qualities

5

Annal

A record of events

6

Slapdash

Done to hurriedly and carefreely

7

Mason

A builder and worker in stone

8

Storax

a solid resin with a vanillalike odor, obtained from a small tree, Styrax officinalis: formerly used in medicine and perfumery.

9

Tress

Usually, tresses. long locks or curls of hair.
a plait or braid of hair.

10

Madonna

The Virgin Mary

11

Quintet

any set or group of five persons or things.

12

Brocade

fabric woven with an elaborate design, especially one having a raised overall pattern.

13

Muff

a thick, tubular case for the hands, covered with fur or other material, used by women and girls for warmth and as a handbag.

A woman's pubic area

14

Jeer

to speak or shout derisively; scoff or gibe rudely

15

Gibe

to utter mocking or scoffing words; jeer.

16

Scoff

to speak derisively; mock; jeer (often followed by at )

17

Tart

a prostitute or promiscuous woman.

18

Erotic

arousing or satisfying sexual desire

19

Forlorn

desolate or dreary; unhappy or miserable, as in feeling, condition, or appearance.
lonely and sad; forsaken.
expressive of hopelessness; despairing: forlorn glances.
bereft; destitute: forlorn of comfort.

20

Precocious

unusually advanced or mature in development, especially mental development: a precocious child.

21

Finesse

extreme delicacy or subtlety in action, performance, skill, discrimination, taste, etc.
skill in handling a difficult or highly sensitive situation; adroit and artful management: exceptional diplomatic finesse.
a trick, artifice, or stratagem.

22

Decrepit

weakened by old age; feeble; infirm: a decrepit man who can hardly walk.
worn out by long use; dilapidated: a decrepit stove.

23

Gristle

cartilage, especially in meats.

24

Malaise

a condition of general bodily weakness or discomfort, often marking the onset of a disease.
a vague or unfocused feeling of mental uneasiness, lethargy, or discomfort.

25

Caprine

of or relating to goats.

26

Phantasmal

pertaining to or of the nature of a phantasm; unreal; illusory; spectral: phantasmal creatures of nightmare.

27

Rutting

the periodically recurring sexual excitement of the deer, goat, sheep, etc.

28

Inexpert

not expert; unskilled.

29

Fumigate

to expose to smoke or fumes, as in disinfecting or exterminating roaches, ants, etc.

30

Odoriferous

yielding or diffusing an odor.

31

Trepidation

tremulous fear, alarm, or agitation; perturbation.
trembling or quivering movement; tremor.

32

Eunuch

a castrated man, especially one formerly employed by rulers in the Middle East and Asia as a harem guard or palace official.

33

Kibitzer

a giver of uninvited or unwanted advice.
a person who jokes, chitchats, or makes wisecracks, especially while others are trying to work or to discuss something seriously.

34

Savior-faire

knowledge of just what to do in any situation; tact.

35

Fete champetre

an outdoor festival or a garden party.

36

Olfactory

of or relating to the sense of smell: olfactory organs.

37

Pantomime

the art or technique of conveying emotions, actions, feelings, etc., by gestures without speech.

38

Effete

lacking in wholesome vigor; degenerate; decadent: an effete, overrefined society.
exhausted of vigor or energy; worn out: an effete political force.
unable to produce; sterile.

39

Cloy

to weary by an excess of food, sweetness, pleasure; surfeit; satiate

to become uninteresting or distasteful through overabundance

40

Croon

to sing or hum in a soft, soothing voice: to croon to a baby.
to sing in an evenly modulated, slightly exaggerated manner: Popular singers began crooning in the 1930s.
to utter a low murmuring sound.

41

Stand someone in good stead

To be useful or of good service

42

Detractor

to take away a part, as from quality, value, or reputation (usually followed by from ).


to draw away or divert; distract: to detract another's attention from more important issues.

43

Apropos

fitting; at the right time; to the purpose; opportunely.
Obsolete. by the way.

adjective

opportune; pertinent: apropos remarks.

Idioms

apropos of, with reference to; in respect or regard to: apropos of the preceding statement.

44

Beatification

Roman Catholic Church. the official act of the pope whereby a deceased person is declared to be enjoying the happiness of heaven, and therefore a proper subject of religious honor and public cult in certain places.

45

Provocateur

a person who provokes trouble, causes dissension, or the like; agitator.

46

Dissension

strong disagreement; a contention or quarrel; discord.

difference in sentiment or opinion; disagreement.

47

Commune

to converse or talk together, usually with profound intensity, intimacy, etc.; interchange thoughts or feelings.
to be in intimate communication or rapport: to commune with nature.

48

Erroneous

containing error; mistaken; incorrect; wrong: an erroneous answer.
straying from what is moral, decent, proper, etc.

49

Rear up

(of a person) to start up in angry excitement, hot resentment, or the like (usually followed by up ).

50

Finery

fine or showy dress, ornaments, etc.

51

Virulent

actively poisonous; intensely noxious: a virulent insect bite.
Medicine/Medical. highly infective; malignant or deadly.
Bacteriology. causing clinical symptoms.
violently or spitefully hostile.
intensely bitter, spiteful, or malicious: a virulent attack.

52

Noxious

harmful or injurious to health or physical well-being: noxious fumes.
morally harmful; corrupting; pernicious: a noxious plan to spread dissension.

53

Effulgence

a brilliant radiance; a shining forth.

54

Mujaheddin

Muslim guerrilla fighters, especially in Afghanistan and Iran.

55

Asunder

into separate parts; in or into pieces: Lightning split the old oak tree asunder.

apart or widely separated: as wide asunder as the polar regions.

56

Infernal

hellish; fiendish; diabolical: an infernal plot.
extremely troublesome, annoying, etc.; outrageous: an infernal nuisance.
of, inhabiting, or befitting hell.

57

Miasmia

noxious exhalations from putrescent organic matter; poisonous effluvia or germs polluting the atmosphere.

a dangerous, foreboding, or deathlike influence or atmosphere.

58

Linchpin

something that holds the various elements of a complicated structure together

59

Depilate

to remove the hair from (hides, skin, etc.).

60

Forthcoming

coming, forth, or about to come forth; about to appear; approaching in time: the forthcoming concert.
ready or available when required or expected: He assured us that payment would be forthcoming.
frank and cooperative; candid: In his testimony, the senator could have been more forthcoming.
friendly and outgoing; sociable.

61

Sysphean

Such that it can never be complete

62

Insensate

not endowed with sensation; inanimate: insensate stone.
without human feeling or sensitivity; cold; cruel; brutal.
without sense, understanding, or judgment; foolish.

63

Gaslight

to cause (a person) to doubt his or her sanity through the use of psychological manipulation: How do you know if your partner is gaslighting you?

64

Credence

belief as to the truth of something: to give credence to a claim.
something giving a claim to belief or confidence: letter of credence.

65

Abetting

to encourage, support, or countenance by aid or approval, usually in wrongdoing: to abet a swindler; to abet a crime.

66

Cisgender

Also, cis·gen·dered. noting or relating to a person whose gender identity corresponds with that person’s biological sex assigned at birth.

67

Lacksadaisical

Lacking enthusiasm and determination, carelessly lazy

68

Ontology

the branch of metaphysics that studies the nature of existence or being as such.

69

Impolitic

not politic, expedient, or judicious

70

Debonair

Confident, stylish, charming

71

Peak

Ring loudly like bells

72

Dove

Also called peace dove. a person, especially one in public office, who advocates peace or a conciliatory

73

Beatitude

supreme blessedness; exalted happiness.

74

Sardonic

characterized by bitter or scornful derision; mocking; cynical; sneering: a sardonic grin.

75

Courtier

a person who is often in attendance at the court of a king or other royal personage.
a person who seeks favor by flattery, charm, etc.

76

Malodor

an unpleasant or offensive odor; stench.

77

Gangplank

a flat plank or small, movable, bridgelike structure for use by persons boarding or leaving a ship at a pier.

78

Heathen

(in historical contexts) an individual of a people that do not acknowledge the God of the Bible; a person who is neither a Jew, Christian, nor Muslim; a pagan.
Informal. an irreligious, uncultured, or uncivilized person.

79

Exudation

the act of exuding.
something that is exuded.
a discharge of certain elements of the blood into the tissues.

80

Pestilence

a deadly or virulent epidemic disease.
bubonic plague.
something that is considered harmful, destructive, or evil.

81

Natal

of or relating to a person's birth: celebrating one's natal day.
presiding over or affecting a person at birth: natal influences.
(of places) native: nostalgia for one's natal town.

82

Anteroom

a room that admits to a larger room.
a waiting room.

83

Suttee

a Hindu practice whereby a widow immolates herself on the funeral pyre of her husband: now abolished by law.
a Hindu widow who so immolates herself.

84

Occult

of or relating to magic, astrology, or any system claiming use or knowledge of secret or supernatural powers or agencies.
beyond the range of ordinary knowledge or understanding; mysterious.
secret; disclosed or communicated only to the initiated.
hidden from view.

85

Doldrums

a state of inactivity or stagnation, as in business or art: August is a time of doldrums for many enterprises.
the doldrums.
a belt of calms and light baffling winds north of the equator between the northern and southern trade winds in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.
the weather prevailing in this area.
a dull, listless, depressed mood; low spirits.

86

Flub

To botch or bungle

87

Bungle

to do clumsily and awkwardly; botch: He bungled the job.

88

Botch

to spoil by poor work; bungle (often followed by up ): He botched up the job thoroughly.
to do or say in a bungling manner.
to mend or patch in a clumsy manner.

89

Namesake

a person named after another.
a person having the same name as another.

90

Bevy

A large group of people or things

91

Compendium

A collection of concise yet detailed information about a particular subject

A collection of things, especially systematically gathered

92

Dapper

neat; trim; smart: He looked very dapper in his new suit.
lively and brisk: to walk with a dapper step.
small and active.

93

Posthaste

with the greatest possible speed or promptness

94

Demure

Reserved, modest, and shy

95

Animus

Hostility or ill feeling

Motivation to do something

96

Interrobang

A non standard punctuation mark indicating a question expressed in an exclamatory manner

97

Pointed

Expressing criticism in a direct and unambiguous way

98

Joust

Compete closely for superiority

99

Brash

Self-assertive in a rude, noisy, or overbearing way

Strong, energetic, or irreverent

100

Reprise

Repeat

101

Lambast

Criticize someone or something harshly

102

Marshal

to arrange in proper order; set out in an orderly manner; arrange clearly: to marshal facts; to marshal one's arguments.

103

Pompadour

an arrangement of a man's hair in which it is brushed up high from the forehead.
an arrangement of a woman's hair in which it is raised over the forehead in a roll, sometimes over a pad.

104

Invective

Insulting, abusive, or highly critical language

105

Dossier

A collection of documents about a particular person, event, subject

106

Histrionic

Overly theatrical or melodramatic in character or style

107

Marauding

Going out in search of things to steal or people to attack

108

Bygone

Relating to an earlier time

109

Purvey

to provide, furnish, or supply (especially food or provisions) usually as a business or service.

110

Incorrigible

not corrigible; bad beyond correction or reform: incorrigible behavior; an incorrigible liar.
impervious to constraints or punishment; willful; unruly; uncontrollable: an incorrigible child; incorrigible hair.
firmly fixed; not easily changed: an incorrigible habit.
not easily swayed or influenced: an incorrigible optimist.

111

Belfry

a bell tower, either attached to a church or other building or standing apart.
the part of a steeple or other structure in which a bell is hung.

112

Petticoat

Also called pettiskirt. an underskirt, especially one that is full and often trimmed and ruffled and of a decorative fabric.
any skirtlike part or covering.

113

Courtesan

a prostitute or paramour, especially one associating with noblemen or men of wealth.

114

Fetid

having an offensive odor; stinking

115

Caterwaul

to utter long wailing cries, as cats in rutting time.
to utter a similar sound; howl or screech.
to quarrel like cats.

116

Gloaming

Twilight, dusk

117

Offal

the parts of a butchered animal that are considered inedible by human beings; carrion.
the parts of a butchered animal removed in dressing; viscera.
refuse; rubbish; garbage.

118

Carrion

dead and putrefying flesh.
rottenness; anything vile.

119

Bewigged

wearing a wig.

120

Congenial

agreeable, suitable, or pleasing in nature or character: congenial surroundings.
suited or adapted in spirit, feeling, temper, etc.; compatible: a congenial couple.

121

Flagon

a large bottle for wine, liquors, etc.
a container for holding liquids, as for use at table, especially one with a handle, a spout, and usually a cove

122

Threadbare

having the nap worn off so as to lay bare the threads of the warp and woof, as a fabric, garment, etc.
wearing threadbare clothes; shabby or poor: a threadbare old man.
meager, scanty, or poor: a threadbare emotional life.
hackneyed; trite; ineffectively stale:

123

Faun

one of a class of rural deities represented as men with the ears, horns, tail, and later also the hind legs of a goat.

124

Incantation

the chanting or uttering of words purporting to have magical power.
the formula employed; a spell or charm.
magical ceremonies.
magic; sorcery.
repetitious wordiness used to conceal a lack of content; obfuscation: Her prose too often resorts to incantation.

125

Succubus

a demon in female form, said to have sexual intercourse with men in their sleep. Compare incubus (def 1).
any demon or evil spirit.
a strumpet or prostitute.

126

Ewe

Female sheep

127

Foal

a young horse, mule, or related animal, especially one that is not yet one year of age.
—verb (used with or without object)

to give birth to (a colt or filly).

128

Saccadic

characterized by discontinuous or sporadic movement; jerky.

129

Rogue

a dishonest, knavish person; scoundrel.
a playfully mischievous person; scamp: The youngest boys are little rogues.
a tramp or vagabond.

130

Cuff

to strike with the open hand; beat; buffet.

131

Emboss

to raise or represent (surface designs) in relief.
to decorate (a surface) with raised ornament.

132

Jaunty

easy and sprightly in manner or bearing: to walk with a jaunty step.
smartly trim, as clothing: a jaunty hat.

133

Bear down

to strive harder; intensify one's efforts: We can't hope to finish unless everyone bears down.

134

Sidereal

determined by or from the stars: sidereal time.
of or relating to the stars.

135

Mar

to damage or spoil to a certain extent; render less perfect, attractive, useful, etc.; impair or spoil: That billboard mars the view. The holiday was marred by bad weather.
to disfigure, deface, or scar: The scratch marred the table.

136

Gore

blood that is shed, especially when clotted.
murder, bloodshed, violence, etc.: That horror movie had too much gore.

137

Harem

the part of a Muslim palace or house reserved for the residence of women.
the women in a Muslim household, including the mother, sisters, wives, concubines, daughters, entertainers, and servants.

138

Unsullied

not soiled, untarnished: an unsullied public persona.
virginal; pure: He wears a purity ring signifying that he will remain unsullied until marriage.

139

Spittle

saliva; spit.

140

Jowl

a jaw, especially the lower jaw.
the cheek.

141

Acrid

sharp or biting to the taste or smell; bitterly pungent; irritating to the eyes, nose, etc.: acrid smoke from burning rubber.
extremely or sharply stinging or bitter; exceedingly caustic: acrid remarks.

142

Caustic

capable of burning, corroding, or destroying living tissue.
severely critical or sarcastic: a caustic remark.

143

Scour

to remove dirt, grease, etc., from or to cleanse or polish by hard rubbing, as with a rough or abrasive material: to scour pots and pans.
to remove (dirt, grease, etc.) from something by hard rubbing: to scour grease from pots and pans.
to clear or dig out (a channel, drain, etc.) as by the force of water, by removing debris, etc.
to purge thoroughly, as an animal.
to clear or rid of what is undesirable: to scour the nation of spies.
to remove by or as if by cleansing; get rid of.
to clean or rid of debris, impurities, etc., by or as if by washing, as cotton or wool.

to range over, as in a search: They scoured the countryside for the lost child.
to run or pass quickly over or along.

144

ApiariAn

relating to bees or to the breeding and care of bees.

145

Ambivalent

uncertainty or fluctuation, especially when caused by inability to make a choice or by a simultaneous desire to say or do two opposite or conflicting things.

146

Blasphemy

impious utterance or action concerning God or sacred things.

147

Heresy

any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs, customs, etc.

148

To wit

That is to say, namely

149

Brier

a prickly plant or shrub, especially the sweetbrier or a greenbrier.
a tangled mass of prickly plants.
a thorny stem or twig.

150

Copse/coppice

a thicket of small trees or bushes; a small wood.

151

Tizzy

a dither.
a nervous, excited, or distracted state.

152

Dither

a trembling; vibration.
a state of flustered excitement or fear.
—verb (used without object)

to act irresolutely; vacillate.

153

Gossamer

a fine, filmy cobweb seen on grass or bushes or floating in the air in calm weather, especially in autumn.

154

Mantle

a loose, sleeveless cloak or cape.

155

Bemuse

to bewilder or confuse (someone).

156

Congeal

to change from a soft or fluid state to a rigid or solid state, as by cooling or freezing: The fat congealed on the top of the soup.
to curdle; coagulate, as a fluid.
to make or become fixed, as ideas, sentiments, or principles:

157

Tableau

a picture, as of a scene

158

Doze

to sleep lightly or fitfully.
to fall into a light sleep unintentionally (often followed by off ): He dozed off during the sermon.
to sleep for a short time; nap.
to be dull or half asleep.

159

Misogamy

hatred of marriage.

160

Tabula rosa

a mind not yet affected by experiences, impressions, etc.
anything existing undisturbed in its original pure state.

161

Fulminous

to explode with a loud noise; detonate.
to issue denunciations or the like (usually followed by against ): The minister fulminated against legalized vice.
—verb (used with object), ful·mi·nat·ed, ful·mi·nat·ing.

to cause to explode.
to issue or pronounce with vehement denunciation, condemnation, or the like.

162

Graffito

Archaeology. an ancient drawing or writing scratched on a wall or other surface.
a single example of graffiti.

163

Chagrin

a feeling of vexation, marked by disappointment or humiliation.
—verb (used with object), cha·grined or cha·grinned, cha·grin·ing or cha·grin·ning.

to vex by disappointment or humiliation: The rejection of his proposal chagrined him deeply.

164

Buggery

Sodomy

165

Pugilistic

a person who fights with the fists; a boxer, usually a professional.

166

Stock in trade

the typical subject or commodity a person, company, or profession uses or deals in.
"information is our stock-in-trade"
qualities, ideas, or behavior characteristic of a person or their work.
"flippancy is his stock-in-trade"
the goods kept on hand by a business for the purposes of its trade.

167

To take something in stride

to calmly and easily deal with something unpleasant or difficult and not let it affect what you are doing

168

Viridian

a long-lasting, bluish-green pigment, consisting of a hydrated oxide of chromium.

169

Genteel

belonging or suited to polite society.
well-bred or refined; polite; elegant; stylish.
affectedly or pretentiously polite, delicate, etc.

170

Subterfuge

an artifice or expedient used to evade a rule, escape a consequence, hide something, etc.

171

Make short work of

to finish or deal with something quickly

172

Retch

to make efforts to vomit.
—verb (used with object)

to vomit.

173

Chthonian

of or relating to the deities, spirits, and other beings dwelling under the earth.

174

Caron

any strike and rebound, as a ball striking a wall and glancing off.

175

Languish

to be or become weak or feeble; droop; fade.
to lose vigor and vitality.
to undergo neglect or experience prolonged inactivity; suffer hardship and distress: to languish in prison for ten years.
to be subjected to delay or disregard; be ignored: a petition that languished on the warden's desk for a year.
to pine with desire or longing.
to assume an expression of tender, sentimental melancholy.

176

Chaste

refraining from sexual intercourse that is regarded as contrary to morality or religion; virtuous.
virgin.
not engaging in sexual relations; celibate.
free from obscenity; decent: chaste conversation.

177

Resignation

an accepting, unresisting attitude, state, etc.; submission;

178

Gauche

lacking social grace, sensitivity, or acuteness; awkward; crude; tactless

179

Svelte

slender, especially gracefully slender in figure; lithe.
suave; blandly urbane.

180

Lithe

bending readily; pliant; limber; supple; flexible: the lithe body of a ballerina.

181

Sadistic

pertaining to or characterized by sadism; deriving pleasure or sexual gratification from extreme cruelty: a sadistic psychopath.

182

I'll at ease

Awkward or embarrassed,
Socially uncomfortable

183

Blarney

flattering or wheedling talk; cajolery.
deceptive or misleading talk; nonsense; hooey:

184

Taciturn

inclined to silence; reserved in speech; reluctant to join in conversation.
dour, stern, and silent in expression and manner.

185

Dour

sullen; gloomy: The captain's dour look depressed us all.
severe; stern: His dour criticism made us regret having undertaken the job.

186

Epigram

any witty, ingenious, or pointed saying tersely expressed.

187

Regard

to look upon or think of with a particular feeling: to regard a person with favor.
to have or show respect or concern for.
to think highly of; esteem.
to take into account; consider.
to look at; observe: She regarded him with amusement.
to relate to; concern: The news does not regard the explosion.
to see, look at, or conceive of in a particular way; judge (usually followed by as ): I regard every assignment as a challenge. They regarded his behavior as childish.

188

The likes of you

Similar kind

189

Lilt

rhythmic swing or cadence.

a lilting song or tune.
— verb (used with or without object)

to sing or play in a light, tripping, or rhythmic manner.

190

Lobotomize

to make (someone or something) abnormally tranquil or sluggish.

191

Bumbershoot

an umbrella.

192

Glint

a tiny, quick flash of light.
gleaming brightness; luster.
a brief or slight manifestation or occurrence; inkling; trace.

193

Sight for sore eyes

a way of saying that you are very pleased to see someone or that you think someone is very attractive:

194

Rifle

to ransack and rob (a place, receptacle, etc.).

195

Exactitude

the quality of being exact; exactness; preciseness; accuracy.

196

Gentry

wellborn and well-bred people.
(in England) the class below the nobility.
an upper or ruling class; aristocracy.

197

Riffraff

people, or a group of people, regarded as disreputable or worthless: a pack of riffraff.
the lowest classes; rabble: the riffraff of the city.
trash; rubbish.

198

Beside myself

Extreme joy, anger, etc, brought on by a situation that causes one to be "out of one's mind" with that emotion

199

Bravado

a pretentious, swaggering display of courage.

200

Countrified

rustic or rural in appearance, conduct, etc.: a countrified person; a countrified area amid the suburbs.
not sophisticated or cosmopolitan; provincial.

201

Bric a brac

miscellaneous small articles collected for their antiquarian, sentimental, decorative, or other interest.

202

Hoodoo

bad luck.
a person or thing that brings bad luck.

203

Pickaninny

a term used to refer to a black child.

204

Sleazy

contemptibly low, mean, or disreputable: sleazy politics.
squalid; sordid; filthy; dilapidated: a sleazy hotel.

205

Languid

lacking in vigor or vitality; slack or slow: a languid manner.
lacking in spirit or interest; listless; indifferent.
drooping or flagging from weakness or fatigue; faint.

206

Peer

boldly forward in speech or behavior; impertinent; saucy.
jaunty and stylish; chic; natty.
lively; sprightly; in good health.

207

Furtive

taken, done, used, etc., surreptitiously or by stealth; secret: a furtive glance.
sly; shifty: a furtive manner.

208

Forlorn

desolate or dreary; unhappy or miserable, as in feeling, condition, or appearance.
lonely and sad; forsaken.
expressive of hopelessness; despairing: forlorn glances.
bereft; destitute: forlorn of comfort

209

Coronet

a small crown

210

Ad naseum

to a sickening or disgusting degree

211

Heist

Robbery

212

Sublime

elevated or lofty in thought, language, etc.: Paradise Lost is sublime poetry.
impressing the mind with a sense of grandeur or power; inspiring awe, veneration, etc.: Switzerland has sublime scenery.
supreme or outstanding: a sublime dinner.
complete; absolute; utter: sublime stupidity.

213

Sanctity

holiness, saintliness, or godliness.
sacred or hallowed character: the inviolable sanctity of the temple.
a sacred thing.

214

Hallowed

regarded as holy; venerated; sacred:

215

License

permission to do or not to do something.
intentional deviation from rule, convention, or fact, as for the sake of literary or artistic effect: poetic license.
exceptional freedom allowed in a special situation.
excessive or undue freedom or liberty.

216

Licentious

sexually unrestrained; lascivious; libertine; lewd.
unrestrained by law or general morality; lawless; immoral.
going beyond customary or proper bounds or limits; disregarding rules.

217

Ad lib

something improvised in speech, music, etc.: Was that joke part of your speech or an ad lib?

218

Bistro

a small, modest, European-style restaurant or café.
a small nightclub or restaurant.

219

Shoddy

of poor quality or inferior workmanship: a shoddy bookcase.
intentionally rude or inconsiderate; shabby: shoddy behavior.

220

Sheaf

any bundle, cluster, or collection: a sheaf of papers.

221

Saboteur

person who commits or practices sabotage.

222

Brogue

an Irish accent in the pronunciation of English.
any strong regional accent.

223

Incisive

penetrating; cutting; biting; trenchant: an incisive tone of voice.
remarkably clear and direct; sharp;

224

Punchy

being or appearing vigorously effective; forceful.

Befuddled, dazed

225

Sheaves

any bundle, cluster, or collection: a sheaf of papers.

226

Prim

formally precise or proper, as persons or behavior; stiffly neat.

227

Persnickety

overparticular; fussy.
snobbish or having the aloof attitude of a snob.
requiring painstaking care.

228

Obstrusive

having or showing a disposition to obtrude, as by imposing oneself or one's opinions on others.
(of a thing) obtruding itself: an obtrusive error.
protruding; projecting.

229

Unobstrusive

not obtrusive; inconspicuous, unassertive, or reticent.

230

Cinch

something sure or easy: This problem is a cinch.

231

Penitentiary

a place for imprisonment, reformatory discipline, or punishment, especially a prison maintained in the U.S. by a state or the federal government for serious offenders.

232

Maverick

a lone dissenter, as an intellectual, an artist, or a politician, who takes an independent stand apart from his or her associates

233

Tussle

to struggle or fight roughly or vigorously; wrestle; scuffle.

234

Unexpendable

essential; absolutely required: unexpendable resources vital to our security.
not capable of being expended; inexhaustible: an unexpendable source of energy.

235

Plaintive

expressing sorrow or melancholy; mournful: a plaintive melody.

236

Plangent

resounding loudly, especially with a plaintive sound, as a bell.

237

Lambent

running or moving lightly over a surface: lambent tongues of flame.
dealing lightly and gracefully with a subject; brilliantly playful: lambent wit.
softly bright or radiant: a lambent light.

238

Rococo

ornate or florid in speech, literary style, etc.

239

Erstwhile

former; of times past: erstwhile friends.

240

Salubrious

favorable to or promoting health; healthful: salubrious air.

241

Incandescent

of light) produced by incandescence.
glowing or white with heat.
intensely bright; brilliant.
brilliant; masterly; extraordinarily lucid: an incandescent masterpiece; incandescent wit.
aglow with ardor, purpose, etc.: the incandescent vitality of youth.

242

Bibliophile

A person who collects or has a great love of books

243

Ignoramus

an extremely ignorant person.

244

Cajolery

persuasion by flattery or promises; wheedling; coaxing.

245

High jinks

boisterous celebration or merrymaking; unrestrained fun: T

246

Buffet

to strike, as with the hand or fist.
to strike against or push repeatedly: The wind buffeted the house.
to contend against; battle.

247

Festoon

a string or chain of flowers, foliage, ribbon, etc., suspended in a curve between two points.

248

Morgue

a place in which bodies are kept, especially the bodies of victims of violence or accidents, pending identification or burial.

249

Derelict

left or deserted, as by the owner or guardian; abandoned: a derelict ship.
neglectful of duty; delinquent; negligent.
—noun

a person abandoned by society, especially a person without a permanent home and means of support; vagrant; bum.

250

Bedraggled

limp and soiled, as with rain or dirt.

251

Portent

an indication or omen of something about to happen, especially something momentous.
threatening or disquieting significance: an occurrence of dire portent.
a prodigy or marvel.

252

Precocious

unusually advanced or mature in development, especially mental development: a precocious child.
prematurely developed, as the mind, faculties, etc.

253

Garrote

to execute by the garrote.
to strangle or throttle, especially in the course of a robbery.

254

Strafe

to attack (ground troops or installations) by airplanes with machine-gun fire.
Slang. to reprimand viciously.

255

Flagon

a large bottle for wine, liquors, etc.
a container for holding liquids, as for use at table, especially one with a handle, a spout, and usually a cover

256

Twotimer

to be unfaithful to (a lover or spouse).

257

Fete

to entertain at or honor with a fete

258

Purloined

to take dishonestly; steal; filch; pilfer.
—verb (used without object)

to commit theft; steal.

259

Doff

to remove or take off, as clothing.

260

Prurient

having, inclined to have, or characterized by lascivious or lustful thoughts, desires, etc.
causing lasciviousness or lust.
having a restless desire or longing.

261

Foreboding

a prediction; portent.
a strong inner feeling or notion of a future misfortune, evil, etc.; presentiment.

262

Forthcoming

coming, forth, or about to come forth; about to appear; approaching in time: the forthcoming concert.
ready or available when required or expected: He assured us that payment would be forthcoming.
frank and cooperative; candid: In his testimony, the senator could have been more forthcoming.
friendly and outgoing; sociable.

263

Impetuous

of, relating to, or characterized by sudden or rash action, emotion, etc.; impulsive: an impetuous decision; an impetuous person.

264

Archetype

the original pattern or model from which all things of the same kind are copied or on which they are based; a model or first form; prototype.
(in Jungian psychology) a collectively inherited unconscious idea, pattern of thought, image, etc., universally present in individual psyches.

265

Allegory

a representation of an abstract or spiritual meaning through concrete or material forms; figurative treatment of one subject under the guise of another.
a symbolical narrative: the allegory of Piers Plowman.

266

Landlubber

an unseasoned sailor or someone unfamiliar with the sea.

267

Enervate

to deprive of force or strength; destroy the vigor of; weaken.

268

Sultry

oppressively hot and close or moist; sweltering: a sultry day.
oppressively hot; emitting great heat: the sultry sun.
characterized by or associated with sweltering heat: sultry work in the fields.
characterized by or arousing passion: sultry eyes.

269

Morose

gloomily or sullenly ill-humored, as a person or mood.
characterized by or expressing gloom.

270

Trifle

an article or thing of very little value.
a matter, affair, or circumstance of trivial importance or significance.
a small, inconsiderable, or trifling sum of money.
a small quantity or amount of anything; a little: She's still a trifle angry.
a literary, musical, or artistic work of a light or trivial character having no great or lasting merit; bagatelle.
a kind of pewter of medium hardness.

271

Steel

to render insensible, inflexible, unyielding, determined, etc.:

272

Surly

churlishly rude or bad-tempered: a surly waiter. Synonyms: sullen, uncivil, brusque, irascible, splenetic, choleric, cross; grumpy, grouchy, crabby.
unfriendly or hostile; menacingly irritable: a surly old lion. Synonyms: threatening, malevolent.
dark or dismal; menacing; threatening: a surly sky. Synonyms: ominous.

273

Snit

an agitated or irritated state

274

Stodgy

heavy, dull, or uninteresting; tediously commonplace; boring: a stodgy Victorian novel.
of a thick, semisolid consistency; heavy, as food.
stocky; thick-set.
old-fashioned; unduly formal and traditional: a stodgy old gentleman.
dull; graceless; inelegant: a stodgy business suit.

275

Imperative

a command.
something that demands attention or action; an unavoidable obligation or requirement; necessity

276

Tabernacle

any place or house of worship, especially one designed for a large congregation.
(often initial capital letter) the portable sanctuary in use by the Israelites from the time of their wandering in the wilderness after the Exodus from Egypt to the building of the Temple in Jerusalem by Solomon. Ex. 25–27.
Ecclesiastical. an ornamental receptacle for the reserved Eucharist, now generally found on the altar.
a canopied niche or recess, as for an image or icon.
a temporary dwelling or shelter, as a tent or hut.
a dwelling place.
the human body as the temporary abode of the soul.

277

Contraband

Goods that have been imported or exported illegally

Trade in smuggled goods

Adjective
Imported or exported illegally, either in defiance of a total ban or without payment of duty

278

Magnum opus

a great work, especially the chief work of a writer or artist

279

Curry favor

curry favor, to seek to advance oneself through flattery or fawning

280

Foreboding

Implying or seeming to imply that something bad is going to happen

281

Paunchy

having a large and protruding belly; potbellie

282

Posthumous

arising, occurring, or continuing after one's death: a posthumous award for bravery.
published after the death of the author: a posthumous novel.
born after the death of the father.

283

Phallus

an image of the male reproductive organ, especially that carried in procession in ancient festivals of Dionysus, or Bacchus, symbolizing the generative power in nature.
Anatomy. the penis, the clitoris, or the sexually undifferentiated embryonic organ out of which either of these develops.

284

Scorn

to treat or regard with contempt or disdain: They scorned the old beggar.
to reject, refuse, or ignore with contempt or disdain

285

Snarl

to bring into a tangled condition, as thread or hair.

to growl threateningly or viciously, especially with a raised upper lip to bare the teeth, as a dog.
to speak in a surly or threatening manner suggestive of a dog's snarl.

286

Buffoon

a person who amuses others by tricks, jokes, odd gestures and postures, etc.
a person given to coarse or undignified joking.

287

Adultery

voluntary sexual intercourse between a married person and someone other than his or her lawful spouse.

288

Renegade

a person who deserts a party or cause for another.
an apostate from a religious faith.

Traitorous

289

Apostate

a person who forsakes his religion, cause, party, etc.

290

Retainer

a fee paid to secure services, as of a lawyer.

291

Quoth

said (used with nouns, and with first- and third-person pronouns, and always placed before the subject): Quoth the raven, “Nevermore.”

292

Preside

to occupy the place of authority or control, as in an assembly or meeting; act as president or chairperson.
to exercise management or control (usually followed by over ): The lawyer presided over the estate.

293

Rabble rouser

a person who stirs up the passions or prejudices of the public, usually for his or her own interests; demagogue

294

Demagogue

a person, especially an orator or political leader, who gains power and popularity by arousing the emotions, passions, and prejudices of the people.

295

Yule log

a large log of wood that traditionally formed the backlog of the fire at Christmas.

296

Indiscreet

not discreet; lacking prudence, good judgment, or circumspection: an indiscreet remark.

297

Personage

a person of distinction or importance.
any person.
a character in a play, story, etc.

298

Dais

a raised platform, as at the front of a room, for a lectern, throne, seats of honor, etc.

299

Unfrock

to deprive (a monk, priest, minister, etc.) of ecclesiastical rank, authority, and function; depose.
to divest or strip of a frock.

300

Frock

a gown or dress worn by a girl or woman.
a loose outer garment worn by peasants and workers; smock.
a coarse outer garment with large sleeves, worn by monks.

301

Defile

to make foul, dirty, or unclean; pollute; taint; debase.
to violate the chastity of.
to make impure for ceremonial use; desecrate.
to sully, as a person's reputation.

302

Sully

to soil, stain, or tarnish.
to mar the purity or luster of; defile: to sully a reputation.

303

Disparaging

that disparages; tending to belittle or bring reproach upon

304

Reproach

to find fault with (a person, group, etc.); blame; censure.
to upbraid.
to be a cause of blame or discredit to.
—noun

blame or censure conveyed in disapproval:

305

Occult

of or relating to magic, astrology, or any system claiming use or knowledge of secret or supernatural powers or agencies.
beyond the range of ordinary knowledge or understanding; mysterious.
secret; disclosed or communicated only to the initiated.
hidden from view.

306

Pseudoscience

any of various methods, theories, or systems, as astrology, psychokinesis, or clairvoyance, considered as having no scientific basis.

307

Abreast

Side by side

308

Portage

the act of carrying; carriage.

309

Pitiless

feeling or showing no pity; merciless: pitiless criticism of his last novel.

310

Ennui

a feeling of utter weariness and discontent resulting from satiety or lack of interest; boredom: The endless lecture produced an unbearable ennui.

311

Carpetbagger

any opportunistic or exploitive outsider

312

Innuendo

an indirect intimation about a person or thing, especially of a disparaging or a derogatory nature.

313

Tip ones hand

Reveal ones intention inadvertently

314

Contrarian

a person who takes an opposing view, especially one who rejects the majority opinion, as in economic matters.

315

Hubbub

a loud, confused noise, as of many voices: There was quite a hubbub in the auditorium after the announcement.
tumult; uproar.

316

Jubilee

the celebration of any of certain anniversaries, as the twenty-fifth (silver jubilee) fiftieth (golden jubilee) or sixtieth or seventy-fifth (diamond jubilee)
the completion of 50 years of existence, activity, or the like, or its celebration: Our college will celebrate its jubilee next year.
any season or occasion of rejoicing or festivity.
rejoicing or jubilation.

317

Climactic

pertaining to or coming to a climax: the climactic scene of a play.

318

Double bind

dou·ble bind
ˈˌdəbəl ˈbīnd/
noun
a situation in which a person is confronted with two irreconcilable demands or a choice between two undesirable courses of action.

319

Wont

Accustomed; used

320

Greenwash

Disinformation disenchanted by an organization so as to present an environmentally responsible public image

321

Ball

to stop, as at an obstacle, and refuse to proceed or to do something specified (usually followed by at )

322

Insurgent

a person who rises in forcible opposition to lawful authority, especially a person who engages in armed resistance to a government or to the execution of its laws; rebel.
a member of a section of a political party that revolts against the methods or policies of the party.
—adjective

of or characteristic of an insurgent or insurgents.
surging or rushing in

323

Apotheosis

The highest point in development of something, culmination or climax

324

Dovetail

To fit or cause to fit together easily and conveniently

325

Desecrate

to divest of sacred or hallowed character or office.
to divert from a sacred to a profane use or purpose.
to treat with sacrilege; profane.

326

Sacrilege

the violation or profanation of anything sacred or held sacred.
an instance of this.
the stealing of anything consecrated to the service of God.

327

Addle

to make or become confused.
to make or become rotten, as eggs.
—adjective

mentally confused; muddled.
rotten: addle eggs.

328

Bemuse

to bewilder or confuse (someone).

329

Throng

a multitude of people crowded or assembled together; crowd.
a great number of things crowded or considered together: a throng of memories.

330

Frond

an often large, finely divided leaf, especially as applied to the ferns and certain palms.
a leaflike expansion not differentiated into stem and foliage, as in lichens.

331

Caliph

a spiritual leader of Islam, claiming succession from Muhammad.

332

Potentate

a person who possesses great power, as a sovereign, monarch, or ruler.

333

Preen

(of animals, especially birds) to trim or dress (feathers, fur, etc.) with the beak or tongue: The peacock preened itself on the lawn.
to dress (oneself) carefully or smartly; primp: The king preened himself in his elaborate ceremonial robes.
to pride (oneself) on an achievement, personal quality, etc.: He preened himself on having been graduated with honors.
—verb (used without object)

to make oneself appear striking or smart in dress or appearance: No amount of careful preening will compensate for poor posture.
to be exultant or proud.

334

Telltale

that reveals or betrays what is not intended to be known: a telltale blush.

335

Oblige

to be kindly accommodating

336

Legion

very great in number: The holy man's faithful followers were legion.

337

Stake a claim

Indicate something as ones own

338

Fanciful

characterized by or showing fancy; capricious or whimsical in appearance: a fanciful design of butterflies and flowers.
suggested by fancy; imaginary; unreal: fanciful lands of romance.
led by fancy rather than by reason and experience; whimsical: a fanciful mind

339

Pastoral

having the simplicity, charm, serenity, or other characteristics generally attributed to rural areas: pastoral scenery; the pastoral life.
pertaining to the country or to life in the country; rural; rustic.

340

Ribald

vulgar or indecent in speech, language, etc.; coarsely mocking, abusive, or irreverent; scurrilous.

341

Spoor

a track or trail, especially that of a wild animal pursued as game.

342

Effluvium

a slight or invisible exhalation or vapor, especially one that is disagreeable or noxious.

343

Eulogize

to praise highly.
to speak or write a eulogy about.

344

Eulogy

a speech or writing in praise of a person or thing, especially a set oration in honor of a deceased person.
high praise or commendation.

345

Abdicate

to renounce or relinquish a throne, right, power, claim, responsibility, or the like, especially in a formal manner: The aging founder of the firm decided to abdicate.
—verb (used with object), ab·di·cat·ed, ab·di·cat·ing.

to give up or renounce (authority, duties, an office, etc.), especially in a voluntary, public, or formal manner: King Edward VIII of England abdicated the throne in 1936.

346

Pique

to affect with sharp irritation and resentment, especially by some wound to pride: She was greatly piqued when they refused her invitation.

347

Misgiving

a feeling of doubt, distrust, or apprehension.

348

Matron

a married woman, especially one who is mature and staid or dignified and has an established social position.

349

Culminate

to reach the highest point, summit, or highest development (usually followed by in ).
to end or arrive at a final stage (usually followed by in ): The argument culminated in a fistfight.
to rise to or form an apex; terminate (usually followed by in ): The tower culminates in a tall spire.
Astronomy. (of a celestial body) to be on the meridian, or reach the highest or the lowest altitude.
—verb (used with object), cul·mi·nat·ed, cul·mi·nat·ing.

to bring to a close; complete; climax: A rock song culminates the performance.

350

Egress

the act or an instance of going, especially from an enclosed place.
a means or place of going out; an exit.
the right or permission to go out.
Astronomy. emersion (def 1).
—verb (used without object)

to go out; emerge.

351

Bide ones time

bide one's time, to wait for a favorable opportunity: He wanted to ask for a raise, but bided his time.

352

Shoot it's wad

Do all that one can do

353

Klatsch

a casual gathering of people, especially for refreshments and informal conversation: a sewing klatsch.

354

Animistic

the belief that natural objects, natural phenomena, and the universe itself possess souls.
the belief that natural objects have souls that may exist apart from their material bodies.
the doctrine that the soul is the principle of life and health.
belief in spiritual beings or agencies.

355

Sacrament

a thing of mysterious or sacred significance

356

Titillate

to excite or arouse agreeably: to titillate the fancy. Synonyms: rouse, tempt, tease.
to tickle; excite a tingling or itching sensation in, as by touching or stroking lightly.

357

Comport

to bear or conduct (oneself); behave: He comported himself with dignity.
—verb (used without object)

to be in agreement, harmony, or conformity (usually followed by with ): His statement does not comport with the facts.

358

Pulpit

a platform or raised structure in a church, from which the sermon is delivered or the service is conducted

359

Randy

sexually aroused; lustful; lecherous

360

Leer

to look with a sideways or oblique glance, especially suggestive of lascivious interest or sly and malicious intention: I can't concentrate with you leering at me.
—noun

a lascivious or sly look.

361

Terminus

the end or extremity of anything.
either end of a railroad line.
British. the station or the town at the end of a railway or bus route.
the point toward which anything tends; goal or end.
a boundary or limit.
a boundary post or stone.

362

Snare

a device, often consisting of a noose, for capturing small game.
anything serving to entrap or entangle unawares; trap.

to catch with a snare; entangle.
to catch or involve by trickery or wile: to snare her into going.

363

Redcap

a baggage porter at a railroad station

364

Beleaguered

to surround with military forces.
to surround or beset, as with troubles.

365

Quibble

an instance of the use of ambiguous, prevaricating, or irrelevant language or arguments to evade a point at issue.
the general use of such arguments.
petty or carping criticism; a minor objection.

366

Sophistry

a subtle, tricky, superficially plausible, but generally fallacious method of reasoning.
a false argument; sophism.

367

Chicanery

trickery or deception by quibbling or sophistry: He resorted to the worst flattery and chicanery to win the job.
a quibble or subterfuge used to trick, deceive, or evade

368

Subterfuge

an artifice or expedient used to evade a rule, escape a consequence, hide something, etc.

369

Loins

Genital and pubic areas

370

Promethean

of or suggestive of Prometheus.
creative; boldly original.
—noun

a person who resembles Prometheus in spirit or action.

371

Lubricious

arousing or expressive of sexual desire; lustful; lecherous.

372

Katzenjammer

the discomfort and illness experienced as the aftereffects of excessive drinking; hangover.
uneasiness; anguish; distress.
uproar; clamor: His speech produced a public katzenjammer.

373

Libidinous

full of sexual lust; lustful; lewd; lascivious.
of, relating to, or characteristic of the libido.

374

Seedy

poorly kept; run-down; shabby.
shabbily dressed; unkempt: a seedy old tramp.
physically run-down; under the weather: He felt a bit seedy after his operation.
somewhat disreputable; degraded: a seedy hotel.

375

Assay

to examine or analyze: to assay a situation; to assay an event.
Metallurgy. to analyze (an ore, alloy, etc.) in order to determine the quantity of gold, silver, or other metal in it.

376

Clearinghouse

a central institution or agency for the collection, maintenance, and distribution of materials, information, etc.

377

Insouciant

free from concern, worry, or anxiety; carefree; nonchalant.

378

Chromatic

pertaining to color or colors.

379

Thoroughgoing

doing things thoroughly.
carried out to the full extent; thorough.
complete; unqualified: a thoroughgoing knave.

380

Elegy

A poem of serious reflection, typically a lament for the dead

381

Diaspora

The dispersion of any people from their original homeland

382

Ivory tower

A state of privileged seclusion or separation from the facts and practicalities of the real world

383

Embalm

to treat (a dead body) so as to preserve it, as with chemicals, drugs, or balsams.
to preserve from oblivion; keep in memory: his deeds embalmed in the hearts of his disciples.
to cause to remain unchanged; prevent the development of.
to impart a balmy fragrance to.

384

Ersatz

serving as a substitute; synthetic; artificial

385

Bauble

a showy, usually cheap, ornament; trinket; gewgaw.

386

Bombshell

Overwhelming surprise or disappointment

Very attractive woman

387

Desi

Local; indigenous

Rustic, unsophisticated

A person of Indian, Pakistani, or Bangladeshi birth or descent who lives abroad

388

Ambrosia

The food of gods

Something very pleasing to taste or smell

389

Seminal

Of a work, event, monument, or figure strongly influencing later development

390

Parochial

of, relating to, or financially supported by one or more church parishes: parochial churches in Great Britain.
of or relating to parochial schools or the education they provide.
very limited or narrow in scope or outlook; provincial

391

Memento

An object kept as a reminder or souvenir of a person or event

392

Juju

Luck

393

Harrowing

Acutely distressing

394

Sojourn

A temporary stay

stay somewhere temporarily

395

Extant

Still in existence

396

Parlay

Informal. to use (one's money, talent, or other assets) to achieve a desired objective, as spectacular wealth or success: He parlayed a modest inheritance into a fortune.

397

Furor

An outbreak of public anger or excitement

398

Adulation

Excessive devotion to someone

To show excessive admiration or devotion to; flatter or admire

399

Autoerotic

producing sexual excitement or pleasure without association with another person or external stimulation.

400

Cull

to choose; select; pick.
to gather the choice things or parts from.
to collect; gather; pluck.

401

Overwrought

extremely or excessively excited or agitated: to become overwrought on hearing bad news; an overwrought personality.
elaborated to excess; excessively complex or ornate: written in a florid, overwrought style.

402

Manifold

of many kinds; numerous and varied: manifold duties.
having numerous different parts, elements, features, forms, etc.: a manifold program for social reform.
using, functioning with, or operating several similar or identical devices at the same time.
(of paper business forms) made up of a number of sheets interleaved with carbon paper.
being such or so designated for many reasons: a manifold enemy.

403

Debonair

courteous, gracious, and having a sophisticated charm: a debonair gentleman.

jaunty; carefree; sprightly.

404

Emancipate

to free from restraint, influence, or the like.
to free (a slave) from bondage.

405

Artifice

a clever trick or stratagem; a cunning, crafty device or expedient; wile.
trickery; guile; craftiness.
cunning; ingenuity; inventiveness: a drawing-room comedy crafted with artifice and elegance.
a skillful or artful contrivance or expedient.

406

Potentiate

to cause to be potent; make powerful.
to increase the effectiveness of; intensify.

407

Opine

to hold or express an opinion.

408

In cahoots

In partnership, in conspiracy

409

Passé

no longer fashionable, in wide use, etc.; out-of-date; outmoded

410

Plenary

Unqualified, absolute
full; complete; entire; absolute; unqualified: plenary powers.
attended by all qualified members; fully constituted: a plenary session of Congress.
—noun, plural ple·na·ries.

a plenary session, meeting, or the like.

411

Gravitas

seriousness or sobriety, as of conduct or speech.

412

Collate

to gather or arrange in their proper sequence (the pages of a report, the sheets of a book, the pages of several sets of copies, etc.).

413

Tenement

Also called tenement house. a run-down and often overcrowded apartment house, especially in a poor section of a large city.

414

Ode

a lyric poem typically of elaborate or irregular metrical form and expressive of exalted or enthusiastic emotion.
(originally) a poem intended to be sung.

415

Purgatory

any condition or place of temporary punishment, suffering, expiation, or the like.
—adjective

serving to cleanse, purify, or expiate.

416

Dungaree

work clothes, overalls, etc., of blue denim.
blue jeans.

417

Kitschy


something of tawdry design, appearance, or content created to appeal to popular or undiscriminating taste.

418

Tawdry

(of finery, trappings, etc.) gaudy; showy and cheap.
low or mean; base: tawdry motives.

419

Gaudy

brilliantly or excessively showy: gaudy plumage.
cheaply showy in a tasteless way; flashy.
ostentatiously ornamented; garish.

420

Par for the course

What is normal or expected in any given circumstance

421

Pederasty

sexual relations between two males, especially when one of them is a minor.

422

Solipsism

he theory that only the self exists, or can be proved to exist.
extreme preoccupation with and indulgence of one's feelings, desires, etc.; egoistic self-absorption.

423

Lofty

extending high in the air; of imposing height; towering: lofty mountains.
exalted in rank, dignity, or character; eminent.
elevated in style, tone, or sentiment, as writings or speech.
arrogantly or condescendingly superior in manner; haughty: to treat someone in a lofty manner.

424

Incantation

the chanting or uttering of words purporting to have magical power.
the formula employed; a spell or charm.
magical ceremonies.
magic; sorcery.
repetitious wordiness used to conceal a lack of content; obfuscation:

425

Leaden

dull, spiritless, or gloomy, as in mood or thought: leaden prose; a leaden atmosphere.
of a dull gray color: leaden skies.
oppressive; heavy: a leaden silence.
sluggish; listless: They moved at a leaden pace.
of poor quality or little value.

426

Propitiate

to make favorably inclined; appease; conciliate.

427

Spinster

a woman still unmarried beyond the usual age of marrying.

428

Magnanimity

generous in forgiving an insult or injury; free from petty resentfulness or vindictiveness: to be magnanimous toward one's enemies.
high-minded; noble: a just and magnanimous ruler.
proceeding from or revealing generosity or nobility of mind, character, etc.: a magnanimous gesture of forgiveness.

429

Forestall

Prevent or obstruct an anticipated event or action by taking action ahead of time

430

Outsize

Exceptionally large

431

Steez

Plain old style with ease

432

Par excellence

being an example of excellence; superior; preeminent (used postpositively): a chef par excellence.

433

Demure

Reserved, modest, shy

434

Keep mum

Remain silent, especially so as not to reveal a secret

435

Gauche

Lacking ease or grace; unsophisticated and socially awkward

436

Cantankerous

Bad-tempered, argumentative and uncooperative

437

Effulgent

Shining forth brilliantly; radiant

438

Fetching

Charming, captivating

439

Reposit

to put back; replace.
to lay up or store; deposit.

440

Retinue

a body of retainers in attendance upon an important personage; suite.

441

Homely

lacking in physical attractiveness; not beautiful; unattractive: a homely child.
not having elegance, refinement, or cultivation.
proper or suited to the home or to ordinary domestic life; plain; unpretentious: homely food.
commonly seen or known.

442

Sedate

calm, quiet, or composed; undisturbed by passion or excitement: a sedate party; a sedate horse.

443

Unobtrusive

not obtrusive; inconspicuous, unassertive, or reticent.

444

Subsume

to consider or include (an idea, term, proposition, etc.) as part of a more comprehensive one.

to bring (a case, instance, etc.) under a rule.

to take up into a more inclusive classification.

445

Amorphous

acking definite form; having no specific shape; formless: the amorphous clouds.

446

Fallible

(of persons) liable to err, especially in being deceived or mistaken.
liable to be erroneous or false; not accurate: fallible information.

447

Wistful

characterized by melancholy; longing; yearning.
pensive, especially in a melancholy way.

448

Plaintive

expressing sorrow or melancholy; mournful: a plaintive melody.

449

Absolution

act of absolving; a freeing from blame or guilt; release from consequences, obligations, or penalties.
state of being absolved.

450

Sullen

showing irritation or ill humor by a gloomy silence or reserve.
persistently and silently ill-humored; morose.
indicative of gloomy ill humor.
gloomy or dismal, as weather or a sound.
sluggish, as a stream.

451

Abdicate

to renounce or relinquish a throne, right, power, claim, responsibility, or the like, especially in a formal manner: The aging founder of the firm decided to abdicate.
—verb (used with object), ab·di·cat·ed, ab·di·cat·ing.

to give up or renounce (authority, duties, an office, etc.), especially in a voluntary, public, or formal manner: King Edward VIII of England abdicated the throne in 1936.

452

Expurgate

to amend by removing words, passages, etc., deemed offensive or objectionable: Most children read an expurgated version of Grimms' fairy tales.
to purge or cleanse of moral offensiveness.

453

Convalescence

to recover health and strength after illness; make progress toward recovery of health.

454

Renounce

to give up or put aside voluntarily: to renounce worldly pleasures.
to give up by formal declaration: to renounce a claim.
to repudiate; disown: to renounce one's son.

455

Burlesque

an artistic composition, especially literary or dramatic, that, for the sake of laughter, vulgarizes lofty material or treats ordinary material with mock dignity.
any ludicrous parody or grotesque caricature.
Also, bur·lesk. a humorous and provocative stage show featuring slapstick humor, comic skits, bawdy songs, striptease acts, and a scantily clad female chorus.

456

Obtuse

not quick or alert in perception, feeling, or intellect; not sensitive or observant; dull.
not sharp, acute, or pointed; blunt in form.

457

Hex

to bewitch; practice witchcraft on: He was accused of hexing his neighbors' cows because they suddenly stopped giving milk.

458

Harem

the part of a Muslim palace or house reserved for the residence of women.
the women in a Muslim household, including the mother, sisters, wives, concubines, daughters, entertainers, and servants.

459

Invalid

an infirm or sickly person.
a person who is too sick or weak to care for himself or herself: My father was an invalid the last ten years of his life.

460

Stag

of or for men only: a stag dinner.

461

Posthumous

arising, occurring, or continuing after one's death: a posthumous award for bravery.
published after the death of the author: a posthumous novel.
born after the death of the father.

462

Sadism

Psychiatry. the condition in which sexual gratification depends on causing pain or degradation to others. Compare masochism.
any enjoyment in being cruel.
extreme cruelty.

463

Rivet

to fasten or fix firmly.
to hold (the eye, attention, etc.) firmly.

464

Bower

a leafy shelter or recess; arbor.
a rustic dwelling; cottage.

465

Incubus

an imaginary demon or evil spirit supposed to descend upon sleeping persons, especially one fabled to have sexual intercourse with women during their sleep. Compare succubus (def 1).
a nightmare.
something that weighs upon or oppresses one like a nightmare.

466

Solace

comfort in sorrow, misfortune, or trouble; alleviation of distress or discomfort.
something that gives comfort, consolation, or relief:

467

Fraternize

to associate in a fraternal or friendly way.
to associate cordially or intimately with natives of a conquered country, enemy troops, etc.

468

Denouement

the final resolution of the intricacies of a plot, as of a drama or novel.
the place in the plot at which this occurs.
the outcome or resolution of a doubtful series of occurrences.

469

Rictus

the gape of the mouth of a bird.
the gaping or opening of the mouth

470

Penitentiary

a place for imprisonment, reformatory discipline, or punishment, especially a prison maintained in the U.S. by a state or the federal government for serious offenders.

471

Amalgamate

to mix or merge so as to make a combination; blend; unite; combine: to amalgamate two companies.
Metallurgy. to mix or alloy (a metal) with mercury.

472

Diminutive

small; little; tiny: a diminutive building for a model-train layout.

473

Sublimate

Psychology. to divert the energy of (a sexual or other biological impulse) from its immediate goal to one of a more acceptable social, moral, or aesthetic nature or use.

to make nobler or purer

474

Voluble

characterized by a ready and continuous flow of words; fluent; glib; talkative: a voluble spokesman for the cause.

475

Bequeath

to dispose of (personal property, especially money) by last will: She bequeathed her half of the company to her niece.
to hand down; pass on.

476

Interloper

a person who interferes or meddles in the affairs of others: He was an athiest who felt like an interloper in this religious gathering.
a person who intrudes into a region, field, or trade without a proper license.

477

Heathen

A person who does not belong to a widely held religion as regarded by those who do

A follower of polytheistic religion; a pagan

An unenlightened person; a person regarded as lacking culture or moral principles

478

a social blunder; faux pas.

Gaffe

479

Putative

Generally considered or reputed to be

480

Apprised

to give notice to; inform; advise (often followed by of ): to be apprised of the death of an old friend.

481

Gander

A look

482

Gobs

A large quantity

483

Salacious

lustful or lecherous.
(of writings, pictures, etc.) obscene; grossly indecent.

484

Apropos

fitting; at the right time; to the purpose; opportunely.
Obsolete. by the way.
—adjective

opportune; pertinent:

485

Cutting the rug

Getting your dance on

486

Stymie

to hinder, block, or thwart.

487

Balk

to stop, as at an obstacle, and refuse to proceed or to do something specified (usually followed by at ): He balked at making the speech.
(of a horse, mule, etc.) to stop short and stubbornly refuse to go on.
Baseball. to commit a balk.
— verb (used with object)

to place an obstacle in the way of; hinder; thwart: a sudden reversal that balked her hopes.

Hesitate or be unwilling to accept and idea or understanding

488

Sublimate

Psychology. to divert the energy of (a sexual or other biological impulse) from its immediate goal to one of a more acceptable social, moral, or aesthetic nature or use.

489

Mellifluous

sweetly or smoothly flowing; sweet-sounding: a mellifluous voice; mellifluous tones.
flowing with honey; sweetened with or as if with honey.

490

Lavish

expended, bestowed, or occurring in profusion: lavish spending.
using or giving in great amounts; prodigal (often followed by of ): lavish of his time; lavish of affection.
—verb (used with object)

to expend or give in great amounts or without limit: to lavish gifts on a person.

491

Strident

making or having a harsh sound; grating; creaking: strident insects; strident hinges.
having a shrill, irritating quality or character: a strident tone in his writings.

492

Squall

a sudden, violent gust of wind, often accompanied by rain, snow, or sleet.
a sudden disturbance or commotion

493

Assiduous

constant; unremitting: assiduous reading.
constant in application or effort; working diligently at a task; persevering; industrious; attentive: an assiduous student.

494

Vouchsafe

to grant or give, as by favor, graciousness, or condescension: to vouchsafe a reply to a question.
to allow or permit, as by favor or graciousness: They vouchsafed his return to his own country.

495

Consecration

The action of making or declaring something sacred

496

Concomitant

Naturally accompanying or associated

497

Riffraff

Disreputable or undesirable people

498

Congenial

agreeable, suitable, or pleasing in nature or character: congenial surroundings.
suited or adapted in spirit, feeling, temper, etc.; compatible: a congenial couple.

499

Brook

to bear; suffer; tolerate

500

Slipshod

careless, untidy, or slovenly: slipshod work.
down-at-heel; seedy; shabby.

501

Melee

A confused fight, skirmish, or scuffle

A confused mass of people

502

Secession

The action of withdrawing formally from membership of a federation or body, especially a political state

503

Sojourn

Temporary stay

Stay somewhere temporarily

504

Contraband

Goods that have been imported or exported illegally

505

Consternation

a sudden, alarming amazement or dread that results in utter confusion; dismay.

506

Restitution

reparation made by giving an equivalent or compensation for loss, damage, or injury caused; indemnification.

507

Desecrate

to divest of sacred or hallowed character or office.
to divert from a sacred to a profane use or purpose.
to treat with sacrilege; profane.

508

Dalliance

a trifling away of time; dawdling.
amorous toying; flirtation.

509

Fair weather

weakening or failing in time of trouble: His fair-weather friends left him when he lost his money.

510

Ribald

vulgar or indecent in speech, language, etc.; coarsely mocking, abusive, or irreverent; scurrilous.

511

Iota

A very small quantity, jot, whit

512

Jot

the least part of something; a little bit: I don't care a jot.

513

Whit

a particle; bit; jot (used especially in negative phrases): not a whit better.

514

Indellible

(Of ink or a pen) making marks that cannot be removed

Not able to be forgotten or removed

515

Protuberant

Protruding, bulging

516

Inanity

Nonsensical remark or action; lack of sense or meaning, siliness

517

Daub

Coat of smear a surface with a sticky substance in a carelessly rough or liberal way

518

Glut

An excessively abundant supply of something

Supply or fill to excess

519

Delude

Impose a misleading belief upon someone; deceive; fool

520

Quixotic

Exceedingly idealistic; unrealistic and impractical

521

Improvident

Not showing or having foresight; thoughtless

522

Kitsch

Arts, objects, or design considered to be poor in taste because of excessive garnish or sentimentality, but sometimes appreciated in an ironic or knowing way

523

Insurrection

A violent uprising against an authority or government

524

Antechamber

A small room leading to the main one

525

Disavow

deny any responsibility or support for

526

Postulate

A thing suggested or assumed as true as the basis for reasoning, discussion, or belief

527

Begrudge

Envy someone the possession or enjoyment of something

Give reluctantly or resentfully

528

Memento

An object kept as a souvenir of a person or event

529

Libertine

A person, especially a man, who behaves without moral principles or a sense of responsibilities, especially in sexual matters

A freethinker

530

Epigram

A pithy saying or remark expressing an idea in a clever or amusing way

A short poem, especially a satirical one, having a witty or ingenious ending

531

Dissemble

Conceal ones true motives, feelings, beliefs

Disguise or conceal

532

Heady

(Of liquor) potent; intoxicating

Having a strong or exhilarating effect

533

Allusion

An expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly

534

Occlude

Stop, close up, or obstruct

535

Eponym

A person after whom a discovery, invention, place, etc. is named or thought to be named

536

Malcontents

A person who is dissatisfied and rebellious

537

Consummate

Make a marriage or relationship complete by having sexual intercourse

Complete a transaction or attempt; make perfect

538

Swindler

Use deception to deprive someone of money or possessions

To obtain money fraudulently

539

Downcast

Looking downward

Feeling despondent

540

Scabrous

Rough and covered with, or as if with, scabs

Indecent, salacious

541

Chide

Scold or rebuke

542

Imprel

Drive, force, urge to do something

543

Autodidact

A self-taught person

544

Elan

Energy, style, and enthusiasm

545

Timorous

Showing or suffering from nervousness, fear, or lack of self confidence

546

Monograph

A detailed written study of a single specialized subject or an aspect of it

547

DecAdence

the act or process of falling into an inferior condition or state; deterioration; decay: Some historians hold that the fall of Rome can be attributed to internal decadence.
moral degeneration or decay; turpitude.
unrestrained or excessive self-indulgence.
(often initial capital letter) the decadent movement in literature.

548

Aperture

an opening, as a hole, slit, crack, gap, etc.

549

Cordillera

a chain of mountains, usually the principal mountain system or mountain axis of a large landmass.

550

Subvert

to overthrow (something established or existing).
to cause the downfall, ruin, or destruction of.
to undermine the principles of; corrupt.

551

Promethean

of or suggestive of Prometheus.
creative; boldly original.
—noun

a person who resembles Prometheus in spirit or action.

552

Stymie

to hinder, block, or thwart.

553

Balk

to stop, as at an obstacle, and refuse to proceed or to do something specified (usually followed by at ): He balked at making the speech.
(of a horse, mule, etc.) to stop short and stubbornly refuse to go on.
Baseball. to commit a balk.
— verb (used with object)

to place an obstacle in the way of; hinder; thwart: a sudden reversal that balked her hopes.

Hesitate or be unwilling to accept and idea or understanding

554

Sublimate

Psychology. to divert the energy of (a sexual or other biological impulse) from its immediate goal to one of a more acceptable social, moral, or aesthetic nature or use.

555

Mellifluous

sweetly or smoothly flowing; sweet-sounding: a mellifluous voice; mellifluous tones.
flowing with honey; sweetened with or as if with honey.

556

Lavish

expended, bestowed, or occurring in profusion: lavish spending.
using or giving in great amounts; prodigal (often followed by of ): lavish of his time; lavish of affection.
—verb (used with object)

to expend or give in great amounts or without limit: to lavish gifts on a person.

557

Strident

making or having a harsh sound; grating; creaking: strident insects; strident hinges.
having a shrill, irritating quality or character: a strident tone in his writings.

558

Squall

a sudden, violent gust of wind, often accompanied by rain, snow, or sleet.
a sudden disturbance or commotion

559

Assiduous

constant; unremitting: assiduous reading.
constant in application or effort; working diligently at a task; persevering; industrious; attentive: an assiduous student.

560

Vouchsafe

to grant or give, as by favor, graciousness, or condescension: to vouchsafe a reply to a question.
to allow or permit, as by favor or graciousness: They vouchsafed his return to his own country.

561

Consecration

The action of making or declaring something sacred

562

Concomitant

Naturally accompanying or associated

563

Riffraff

Disreputable or undesirable people

564

Congenial

agreeable, suitable, or pleasing in nature or character: congenial surroundings.
suited or adapted in spirit, feeling, temper, etc.; compatible: a congenial couple.

565

Brook

to bear; suffer; tolerate

566

Slipshod

careless, untidy, or slovenly: slipshod work.
down-at-heel; seedy; shabby.

567

Melee

A confused fight, skirmish, or scuffle

A confused mass of people

568

Secession

The action of withdrawing formally from membership of a federation or body, especially a political state

569

Sojourn

Temporary stay

Stay somewhere temporarily

570

Contraband

Goods that have been imported or exported illegally

571

Consternation

a sudden, alarming amazement or dread that results in utter confusion; dismay.

572

Restitution

reparation made by giving an equivalent or compensation for loss, damage, or injury caused; indemnification.

573

Desecrate

to divest of sacred or hallowed character or office.
to divert from a sacred to a profane use or purpose.
to treat with sacrilege; profane.

574

Dalliance

a trifling away of time; dawdling.
amorous toying; flirtation.

575

Fair weather

weakening or failing in time of trouble: His fair-weather friends left him when he lost his money.

576

Ribald

vulgar or indecent in speech, language, etc.; coarsely mocking, abusive, or irreverent; scurrilous.

577

Iota

A very small quantity, jot, whit

578

Jot

the least part of something; a little bit: I don't care a jot.

579

Whit

a particle; bit; jot (used especially in negative phrases): not a whit better.

580

Indellible

(Of ink or a pen) making marks that cannot be removed

Not able to be forgotten or removed

581

Protuberant

Protruding, bulging

582

Inanity

Nonsensical remark or action; lack of sense or meaning, siliness

583

Daub

Coat of smear a surface with a sticky substance in a carelessly rough or liberal way

584

Glut

An excessively abundant supply of something

Supply or fill to excess

585

Delude

Impose a misleading belief upon someone; deceive; fool

586

Quixotic

Exceedingly idealistic; unrealistic and impractical

587

Improvident

Not showing or having foresight; thoughtless

588

Kitsch

Arts, objects, or design considered to be poor in taste because of excessive garnish or sentimentality, but sometimes appreciated in an ironic or knowing way

589

Insurrection

A violent uprising against an authority or government

590

Antechamber

A small room leading to the main one

591

Disavow

deny any responsibility or support for

592

Postulate

A thing suggested or assumed as true as the basis for reasoning, discussion, or belief

593

Begrudge

Envy someone the possession or enjoyment of something

Give reluctantly or resentfully

594

Memento

An object kept as a souvenir of a person or event

595

Libertine

A person, especially a man, who behaves without moral principles or a sense of responsibilities, especially in sexual matters

A freethinker

596

Epigram

A pithy saying or remark expressing an idea in a clever or amusing way

A short poem, especially a satirical one, having a witty or ingenious ending

597

Dissemble

Conceal ones true motives, feelings, beliefs

Disguise or conceal

598

Heady

(Of liquor) potent; intoxicating

Having a strong or exhilarating effect

599

Allusion

An expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly

600

Occlude

Stop, close up, or obstruct

601

Vitriol

something highly caustic or severe in effect, as criticism

602

Caustic

capable of burning, corroding, or destroying living tissue.
severely critical or sarcastic: a caustic remark.

603

Fastness

a secure or fortified place; stronghold: a mountain fastness.
the state of being fixed or firm: the fastness of democratic institutions.
the state of being rapid.

604

(of unpleasant feelings, experiences, etc.) to continue to cause keen irritation or bitter resentment within the mind; fester; be painful

Rankle

605

favorable to or promoting health; healthful.
promoting or conducive to some beneficial purpose; wholesome.

Salutary

606

equal or coincident in space, time, or scope.

Coextensive

607

Of a feeling or a memory lasting a long time; enduring

Abiding

608

The occurrence of dangerous or exciting things

Incident

"Without incident"

609

the final resolution of the intricacies of a plot, as of a drama or novel.
the place in the plot at which this occurs.
the outcome or resolution of a doubtful series of occurrences.

Denouement

610

a confused mass; a jumble or muddle: a welter of anxious faces.
a state of commotion, turmoil, or upheaval: the welter that followed the surprise attack.
a rolling, tossing, or tumbling about, as or as if by the sea, waves, or wind: They found the shore through the mighty welter.

Welter

611

utterly and shamelessly immoral or dissipated; thoroughly dissolute.
recklessly prodigal or extravagant.

Profligate

612

wastefully or recklessly extravagant: prodigal expenditure.
giving or yielding profusely; lavish (usually followed by of or with ): prodigal of smiles; prodigal with money.
lavishly abundant; profuse: nature's prodigal resources.

Prodigal

613

indulging in or characterized by excessive devotion to pleasure; intemperate; dissolute.

Dissipated

614

given to or characterized by excessive or immoderate indulgence in alcoholic beverages.
immoderate in indulgence of appetite or passion.
not temperate; unrestrained; unbridled.
extreme in temperature, as climate.

Intemperate

615

indifferent to moral restraints; given to immoral or improper conduct; licentious; dissipated.

Dissolute

616

to reduce to utter poverty; impoverish: The family had been beggared by the war.
to cause one's resources of or ability for (description, comparison, etc.) to seem poor or inadequate: The costume beggars description.

Beggar

617

convincing or believable by virtue of forcible, clear, or incisive presentation; telling.
to the point; relevant; pertinent.

Cogent

618

Thrust or force out

Extrude

619

to urge, as something to be remembered or done: She impressed the need for action on them.

Impress

620

position, etc.
an accepting, unresisting attitude, state, etc.; submission; acquiescence: to meet one's fate with resignation

Resignation

621

the state of being in action or of exerting power; operation: the agency of Providence.
a means of exerting power or influence; instrumentality: nominated by the agency of friends.

Agency

622

not easily controlled or directed; not docile or manageable; stubborn; obstinate: an intractable disposition.
(of things) hard to shape or work with: an intractable metal.
hard to treat, relieve, or cure: the intractable pain in his leg.

Intractable

623

a ceremonial or liturgical form of prayer consisting of a series of invocations or supplications with responses that are the same for a number in succession.
the Litany, the supplication in this form in the Book of Common Prayer.
a recitation or recital that resembles a litany.
a prolonged or tedious account: We heard the whole litany of their complaints.

Litany

624

Grist

Useful material, especially to back up an argument

625

Unseemly

Of behavior or actions not appropriate or proper

626

unwarranted or impertinent freedom in action or speech, or a form or instance of it: to take liberties.

Liberty

627

intrusive or presumptuous, as persons or their actions; insolently rude; uncivil: a brash, impertinent youth.
not pertinent or relevant; irrelevant: an impertinent detail.

Impertinent

628

Middling

medium, moderate, oraverage in size, quantity, or quality: The returns on such a large investment may be only middling.
mediocre; ordinary; commonplace; pedestrian: The restaurant's entrées are no better than middling.

629

Vitriol

something highly caustic or severe in effect, as criticism

630

Caustic

capable of burning, corroding, or destroying living tissue.
severely critical or sarcastic: a caustic remark.

631

Fastness

a secure or fortified place; stronghold: a mountain fastness.
the state of being fixed or firm: the fastness of democratic institutions.
the state of being rapid.

632

(of unpleasant feelings, experiences, etc.) to continue to cause keen irritation or bitter resentment within the mind; fester; be painful

Rankle

633

favorable to or promoting health; healthful.
promoting or conducive to some beneficial purpose; wholesome.

Salutary

634

equal or coincident in space, time, or scope.

Coextensive

635

Of a feeling or a memory lasting a long time; enduring

Abiding

636

The occurrence of dangerous or exciting things

Incident

"Without incident"

637

the final resolution of the intricacies of a plot, as of a drama or novel.
the place in the plot at which this occurs.
the outcome or resolution of a doubtful series of occurrences.

Denouement

638

a confused mass; a jumble or muddle: a welter of anxious faces.
a state of commotion, turmoil, or upheaval: the welter that followed the surprise attack.
a rolling, tossing, or tumbling about, as or as if by the sea, waves, or wind: They found the shore through the mighty welter.

Welter

639

utterly and shamelessly immoral or dissipated; thoroughly dissolute.
recklessly prodigal or extravagant.

Profligate

640

wastefully or recklessly extravagant: prodigal expenditure.
giving or yielding profusely; lavish (usually followed by of or with ): prodigal of smiles; prodigal with money.
lavishly abundant; profuse: nature's prodigal resources.

Prodigal

641

indulging in or characterized by excessive devotion to pleasure; intemperate; dissolute.

Dissipated

642

given to or characterized by excessive or immoderate indulgence in alcoholic beverages.
immoderate in indulgence of appetite or passion.
not temperate; unrestrained; unbridled.
extreme in temperature, as climate.

Intemperate

643

indifferent to moral restraints; given to immoral or improper conduct; licentious; dissipated.

Dissolute

644

to reduce to utter poverty; impoverish: The family had been beggared by the war.
to cause one's resources of or ability for (description, comparison, etc.) to seem poor or inadequate: The costume beggars description.

Beggar

645

convincing or believable by virtue of forcible, clear, or incisive presentation; telling.
to the point; relevant; pertinent.

Cogent

646

Thrust or force out

Extrude

647

to urge, as something to be remembered or done: She impressed the need for action on them.

Impress

648

position, etc.
an accepting, unresisting attitude, state, etc.; submission; acquiescence: to meet one's fate with resignation

Resignation

649

the state of being in action or of exerting power; operation: the agency of Providence.
a means of exerting power or influence; instrumentality: nominated by the agency of friends.

Agency

650

not easily controlled or directed; not docile or manageable; stubborn; obstinate: an intractable disposition.
(of things) hard to shape or work with: an intractable metal.
hard to treat, relieve, or cure: the intractable pain in his leg.

Intractable

651

a ceremonial or liturgical form of prayer consisting of a series of invocations or supplications with responses that are the same for a number in succession.
the Litany, the supplication in this form in the Book of Common Prayer.
a recitation or recital that resembles a litany.
a prolonged or tedious account: We heard the whole litany of their complaints.

Litany

652

a whip or lash, especially for the infliction of punishment or torture.
a person or thing that applies or administers punishment or severe criticism.
a cause of affliction or calamity: Disease and famine are scourges of humanity.
—verb (used with object), scourged, scourg·ing.

to whip with a scourge; lash.
to punish, chastise, or criticize severely.

Scourge

653

to bring under complete control or subjection; conquer; master.
to make submissive or subservient; enslave.

Subjugate

654

to allay (thirst, desire, wrath, etc.) by satisfying.
to cool or refresh: He slaked his lips with ice.
to make less active, vigorous, intense, etc.: His calm manner slaked their enthusiasm.

Slake

655

to bring to a state of perfection; fulfill.
to complete (an arrangement, agreement, or the like) by a pledge or the signing of a contract: The company consummated its deal to buy a smaller firm.
to complete (the union of a marriage) by the first marital sexual intercourse.
— adjective

complete or perfect; supremely skilled; superb: a consummate master of the violin.
being of the highest or most extreme degree: a work of consummate skill; an act of consummate savagery.

Consummate

656

vanishing; fading away; fleeting.
tending to become imperceptible; scarcely perceptible

Evanescent

657

Effervescence

to give off bubbles of gas, as fermenting liquors.
to issue forth in bubbles.
to show enthusiasm, excitement, liveliness, etc.: The parents effervesced with pride over their new baby.

658

Hovel

a small, very humble dwelling house; a wretched hut.
any dirty, disorganized dwelling.
an open shed, as for sheltering cattle or tools.

659

dejected; dispirited; discouraged.
having a drooping crest or head.

Crestfallen

660

Travelogue

a lecture, slide show, or motion picture describing travels.

661

Garrote

a method of capital punishment of Spanish origin in which an iron collar is tightened around a condemned person's neck until death occurs by strangulation or by injury to the spinal column at the base of the brain.

662

Patrimony

an estate inherited from one's father or ancestors.
any quality, characteristic, etc., that is inherited; heritage.
the aggregate of one's property.
the estate or endowment of a church, religious house, etc.

663

shameless or impudent: brazen presumption.
made of brass.
like brass, as in sound, color, or strength.
—verb (used with object)

to make brazen or bold.
—Verb phrases

brazen out / through, to face boldly or shamelessly: He prefers to brazen it out rather than admit defeat.

Brazen

664

To provoke or annoy someone so as to stimulate an action or reaction

Drive or urge an animal on with a goad

A thing that stimulates someone into action

Goad

665

Eustress

Moderate or normal psychological stress interpreted as being beneficial for the experiencer

666

without foundation; not based on fact, realistic considerations, or the like: unfounded suspicions.
not established; not founded: the prophet of a religion as yet unfounded.

Unfounded

667

a hostile entrance into or invasion of a place or territory, especially a sudden one; raid: The bandits made brief incursions on the village.
a harmful inroad.
a running in: the incursion of sea water.

Incursion

668

a damaging or serious encroachment: inroads on our savings.
a sudden hostile or predatory incursion; raid; foray.

Inroad

669

the estate or domain of a feudal lord.
Informal. anything, as an organization or real estate, owned or controlled by one dominant person or group.

Fiefdom

670

Francophile

friendly to or having a strong liking for France or the French.
—noun

a person who is friendly to or has a strong admiration of France or the French.

671

regarded as holy; venerated; sacred: Hallowed be Thy name; the hallowed saints; our hallowed political institutions.

Hallowed

672

good-naturedly direct, blunt, or frank; heartily outspoken: a big, bluff, generous man.
presenting a bold and nearly perpendicular front, as a coastline: a bluff, precipitous headland.

Bluff

673

(of a trailer, railroad car, etc.) to swing suddenly to the right or left, as in rounding a sharp curve at high speed.

Whipsaw

674

place or source of origin: The provenance of the ancient manuscript has never been determined.

Provenance

675

to satisfy (any appetite or desire) fully.
to fill to excess; surfeit; glut.

sate

676

a beaver skin, especially one of prime quality.

Plew

677

Clear and obvious

Writ large

678

to confirm by expressing consent, approval, or formal sanction: to ratify a constitutional amendment.
to confirm (something done or arranged by an agent or by representatives) by such action.

Ratify

679

Pandemonium

wild uproar or unrestrained disorder; tumult or chaos.
a place or scene of riotous uproar or utter chaos.
(often initial capital letter) the abode of all the demons.

680

Cauterize

to burn with a hot iron, electric current, fire, or a caustic, especially for curative purposes; treat with a cautery.

681

Ingratiate

Bring oneself into favor with somebody by flattering or trying to please them - a social climber who had tried to ingratiate herself with the city gentry

682

Inscrutable

Impossible to understand or interpret

683

that cannot be subdued or overcome, as persons, will, or courage; unconquerable: an indomitable warrior.

Indomitable

684

of a new kind or fashion: newfangled ideas.
fond of or given to novelty.

Newfangled

685

to utter with a particular tone or voice modulation.
to give tone or variety of tone to; vocalize.
to utter in a singing voice (the first tones of a section in a liturgical service).
to recite or chant in monotone.
—verb (used without object), in·toned, in·ton·ing.

to speak or recite in a singing voice, especially in monotone; chant.
Music. to produce a tone, or a particular series of tones, like a scale, especially with the voice.

Intone

686

to make one's own; adopt or embrace, as a cause.
to marry.
to give (a woman) in marriage.

Espouse

687

to prepare (oneself) for action: He girded himself for the trial ahead.
to provide, equip, or invest, as with power or strength.

Gird

688

a whip or lash, especially for the infliction of punishment or torture.
a person or thing that applies or administers punishment or severe criticism.
a cause of affliction or calamity: Disease and famine are scourges of humanity.
—verb (used with object), scourged, scourg·ing.

to whip with a scourge; lash.
to punish, chastise, or criticize severely.

Scourge

689

to bring under complete control or subjection; conquer; master.
to make submissive or subservient; enslave.

Subjugate

690

generous in forgiving an insult or injury; free from petty resentfulness or vindictiveness: to be magnanimous toward one's enemies.
high-minded; noble: a just and magnanimous ruler.
proceeding from or revealing generosity or nobility of mind, character, etc.: a magnanimous gesture of forgiveness.

Magnanimous

691

an opening or initiating move toward negotiations, a new relationship, an agreement, etc.; a formal or informal proposal or offer: overtures of peace; a shy man who rarely made overtures of friendship.

Overture

692

to repay; remunerate; reward, as for service, aid, etc.
to pay or give compensation for; make restitution or requital for (damage, injury, or the like).
—verb (used without object), rec·om·pensed, rec·om·pens·ing.

to make compensation for something; repay someone: no attempt to recompense for our trouble.
—noun

compensation, as for an injury, wrong, etc.: to make recompense for the loss one's carelessness has caused.
a repayment or requital, as for favors, gifts, etc.
a remuneration or reward, as for services, aid, or the like.

Recompense

693

an appointment to meet at a certain time and place, especially one made somewhat secretly by lovers.
an appointed meeting.
an appointed place of meeting.

Tryst

694

an immediate consequence or easily drawn conclusion.
a natural consequence or result.

Corollary

695

(of a man) to make love with a woman one cannot or will not marry; carry on flirtations.

Philander

696

a multitude of instances of something occurring more or less during the same period of time: a rash of robberies last month.

Rash

697

first in place, order, rank, etc.: the foremost surgeons.

Foremost

698

to overcome the distrust or hostility of; placate; win over: to conciliate an angry competitor.
to win or gain (goodwill, regard, or favor).
to make compatible; reconcile.

Conciliate

699

in the offing,
at a distance but within sight.
in the projected future; likely to happen: A wedding is in the

In the offing

700

a sound or sign announcing the death of a person or the end, extinction, failure, etc., of something: the knell of parting day.

Knell

701

defeat heavily in a contest

Rebuke or punish severely

Trounce

702

Recrimination

a countercharge: The poll suggests that the public is frustrated by the bickering and recriminations.

703

a blunt or abrupt rejection, as of a person making advances.
a peremptory refusal of a request, offer, etc.; snub.
a check to action or progress.

Rebuff

704

Pillory

to expose to public derision, ridicule, or abuse: The candidate mercilessly pilloried his opponent.

705

to bring forward for inspection.
to bring to the attention of; introduce; submit: He trots out his old jokes at every party.

Trot out

706

to show to be false; contradict: His trembling hands belied his calm voice.
to misrepresent: The newspaper belied the facts.
to act unworthily according to the standards of (a tradition, one's ancestry, one's faith, etc.).

Belie

707

to act or interpose in behalf of someone in difficulty or trouble, as by pleading or petition: to intercede with the governor for a condemned man.
to attempt to reconcile differences between two people or groups; mediate.

Intercede

708

Supplicate

to pray humbly; make humble and earnest entreaty or petition.

709

Stymie

o hinder, block, or thwart

710

Proverbial

Referred to in a proverb or idiom

well known, especially so as to be stereotypical

711

A scene of uproar and confusion

Bedlam

712

Contrition

sincere penitence or remorse

713

a minor weakness or failing of character; slight flaw or defect: an all-too-human foible.

Foible

714

stiffly dignified or formal, as speech or literary style; pompous.

Stilted

715

Person who takes part in a dialogue or conversation

Interlocutor

716

The ability to make good judgments and quick decisions

Acumen

717

a flat, dull, or trite remark, especially one uttered as if it were fresh or profound.
the quality or state of being flat, dull, or trite: the platitude of most political oratory.

Platitude

718

to act in an obsequious manner; show servile deference.
to touch the forehead to the ground while kneeling, as an act of worship, reverence, apology, etc., especially in former Chinese custom.

Kowtao

719

characterized by or showing servile complaisance or deference; fawning: an obsequious bow.
servilely compliant or deferential: obsequious servants.

Obsequious

720

to seek notice or favor by servile demeanor: The courtiers fawned over the king.

Fawn

721

strong disagreement; a contention or quarrel; discord.
difference in sentiment or opinion; disagreement.

Dissension

722

minutiae. precise details; small or trifling matters: the minutiae of his craft.

Minutiae

723

to separate into parts with force or violence: The storm rent the ship to pieces.
to tear apart, split, or divide: racial tension that is rending the nation.
to pull or tear violently (often followed by away, off, up, etc.).
to tear (one's garments or hair) in grief, rage, etc.
to disturb (the air) sharply with loud noise.
to harrow or distress (the heart) with painful feelings.

Rend

724

to be sparing or frugal; economize (often followed by on ): They scrimped and saved for everything they have. He spends most of his money on clothes, and scrimps on food.
—verb (used with object)

to be sparing or restrictive of or in; limit severely: to scrimp food.
to keep on short allowance; provide sparingly for: to scrimp their elderly parents.

Scrimp

725

the state or quality of being virile; manly character, vigor, or spirit; masculinity.
the power of procreation.

Virility

726

an imaginary demon or evil spirit supposed to descend upon sleeping persons, especially one fabled to have sexual intercourse with women during their sleep. Compare succubus (def 1).
a nightmare.
something that weighs upon or oppresses one like a nightmare.

Incubus

727

a ravenous, filthy monster having a woman's head and a bird's body.
(lowercase) a scolding, nagging, bad-tempered woman; shrew.
(lowercase) a greedy, predatory person.

Harpy

728

Limpid

clear, transparent, or pellucid, as water, crystal, or air: We could see to the very bottom of the limpid pond.
free from obscurity; lucid; clear: a limpid style; limpid prose.
completely calm; without distress or worry: a limpid, emotionless existence.

729

effusively and almost uninhibitedly enthusiastic; lavishly abundant: an exuberant welcome for the hero.
abounding in vitality; extremely joyful and vigorous.
extremely good; overflowing; plentiful: exuberant health.
profuse in growth or production; luxuriant; superabundant: exuberant vegetation.

Exuberant

730

moderately warm; lukewarm: tepid water.
characterized by a lack of force or enthusiasm: tepid prose; the critics' tepid reception for the new play.

Tepid

731

to instruct or benefit, especially morally or spiritually; uplift: religious paintings that edify the viewer.

Edify

732

Idolent

Wanting to avoid activity or exertion; lazy

Medicine (of a disease) causing little or no pain

733

done, shown, used, etc., maliciously or unjustifiably: a wanton attack; wanton cruelty.
deliberate and without motive or provocation; uncalled-for; headstrong; willful: Why jeopardize your career in such a wanton way?
without regard for what is right, just, humane, etc.; careless; reckless: a wanton attacker of religious convictions.
sexually lawless or unrestrained; loose; lascivious; lewd: wanton behavior.
extravagantly or excessively luxurious, as a person, manner of living, or style.
luxuriant, as vegetation.

Wanton

734

imperturbable self-possession, poise, or assurance.
the perpendicular, or vertical, position.

Aplomb

735

at loggerheads, engaged in a disagreement or dispute; quarreling: They were at loggerheads over the distribution of funds.

At loggerheads

736

bitter, rankling resentment or ill will; hatred; malice.

Rancor

737

without means of subsistence; lacking food, clothing, and shelter.
deprived of, devoid of, or lacking (often followed by of ): destitute of children.

Destitute

738

Hamper or hinder something or someone

Obstruct a path or space

Cumber

739

Ingratiate oneself with someone through obsequious behavior

Curry favor

740

into separate parts; in or into pieces: Lightning split the old oak tree asunder.
apart or widely separated: as wide asunder as the polar regions.

Asunder

741

A bird or mammal, or an imitation of one, used by hunters to attract other birds or mammals

A person or thing used to mislead or lure an animal or person into a trap

Lure or entice a person or animal away from an intended course, typically into a trap

Decoy

742

an epic.
epic poetry.

Epopee

743

Scold or criticize someone angrily

Berate

744

to yield or formally surrender to another: to cede territory.

Cede

745

trammels. a hindrance or impediment to free action; restraint: the trammels of custom.

Trammels

746

the power or right of governing and controlling; sovereign authority.
rule; control; domination.
a territory, usually of considerable size, in which a single rulership holds sway.
lands or domains subject to sovereignty or control.

Dominion

747

good-naturedly direct, blunt, or frank; heartily outspoken: a big, bluff, generous man.
presenting a bold and nearly perpendicular front, as a coastline: a bluff, precipitous headland.

Bluff

748

place or source of origin: The provenance of the ancient manuscript has never been determined.

Provenance

749

grim; unfriendly; hostile; sinister: his forbidding countenance.
dangerous; threatening: forbidding clouds; forbidding cliffs.

Forbidding

750

a beaver skin, especially one of prime quality.

Plew

751

Clear and obvious

Writ large

752

to remove the entrails from; disembowel: to eviscerate a chicken.
to deprive of vital or essential parts: The censors eviscerated the book to make it inoffensive to the leaders of the party.
Surgery. to remove the contents of (a body organ).

Eviscerate

753

incapable of being tired out; not yielding to fatigue; untiring.

Indefatigable

754

a quantity of food taken or provided for one occasion of eating: to eat a light repast.
a meal: the evening repast.
the time during which a meal is eaten; mealtime.

Repast

755

to lie on or along the border of: The hills skirt the town.
to border, wrap, or cover with a skirt or something suggesting a skirt in appearance or function.
to pass along or around the border or edge of: Traffic skirts the town.
to avoid, go around the edge of, or keep distant from (something that is controversial, risky, etc.): The senator skirted the issue.

Skirt

756

Older Use: Disparaging and Offensive. a contemptuous term used to refer to a North American Indian woman, especially a wife.
Slang: Disparaging and Offensive.
a contemptuous term used to refer to a wife.
a contemptuous term used to refer to any woman or girl.

Squaw

757

the slaughter of a great number of people, as in battle; butchery; massacre.
Archaic. dead bodies, as of those slain in battle.

Carnage

758

lacking in vigor or vitality; slack or slow: a languid manner.
lacking in spirit or interest; listless; indifferent.
drooping or flagging from weakness or fatigue; faint.

Languid

759

an act or instance of lying concealed so as to attack by surprise: The highwaymen waited in ambush near the road.
an act or instance of attacking unexpectedly from a concealed position.
the concealed position itself: They fired from ambush.
those who attack suddenly and unexpectedly from a concealed position.
—verb (used with object)

to attack from ambush.

Ambush

760

repugnantly hateful; detestable; loathsome: an abominable crime.
very unpleasant; disagreeable: The weather was abominable last week.
very bad, poor, or inferior: They have abominable taste in clothes.

Abominable

761

to inspect, observe, or survey (the enemy, the enemy's strength or position, a region, etc.) in order to gain information for military purposes.
to examine or survey (a region, area, etc.) for engineering, geological, or other purposes.
—verb (used without object)

to make a reconnaissance.

Reconnoiter

762

in warfare) retaliation against an enemy, for injuries received, by the infliction of equal or greater injuries.
an act or instance of retaliation.
the action or practice of using force, short of war, against another nation, to secure redress of a grievance.
the forcible seizure of property or subjects in retaliation.

Reprisal

763

engaged in raiding for plunder, especially roaming about and ravaging an area: marauding bands of outlaws.
undertaken for plunder: a marauding raid.

Marauding

764

o suffer keenly from wounded feelings: She smarted under their criticism.
to feel shame or remorse or to suffer in punishment or in return for something.

Smart

765

to amuse oneself with some pleasant pastime or recreation.
to play, frolic, or gambol, as a child or an animal.
to engage in some open-air or athletic pastime or sport.
to trifle or treat lightly: to sport with another's emotions.
to mock, scoff, or tease: to sport at suburban life.

Sport

766

to try to win the favor, preference, or goodwill of: to court the rich.
to seek the affections of; woo.
(of animals) to attempt to attract (a mate) by engaging in certain species-specific behaviors.
to attempt to gain (applause, favor, a decision, etc.).
to hold out inducements to; invite.
to act in such a manner as to cause, lead to, or provoke: to court disaster by reckless driving.

Court

767

surrounding; encompassing: circumambient gloom.

Circumambient

768

traveling from place to place, especially on a circuit, as a minister, judge, or sales representative; itinerating; journeying.
characterized by such traveling: itinerant preaching.
working in one place for a comparatively short time and then moving on to work in another place, usually as a physical or outdoor laborer; characterized by alternating periods of working and wandering: an itinerant farm hand.

Itinerant

769

ecstatic joy or delight; joyful ecstasy.

Rapture

770

aimlessly wandering.
taking an irregular course; straggling: a rambling brook.
spread out irregularly in various directions: a rambling mansion.
straying from one subject to another; desultory: a rambling novel.

Rambling

771

to travel or journey, especially to walk on foot.

To travel or walk over; traverse

Peregrinate

772

of, relating to, or resembling a palace: a palatial home.
befitting or suitable for a palace; stately; magnificent: a palatial tapestry.

Palatial

773

A past occurrence, especially something unfortunate, that cannot be undone or rectified

Water under the bridge

774

faultless; flawless; irreproachable: impeccable manners.
not liable to sin; incapable of sin.

Impeccable

775

gloomily or sullenly ill-humored, as a person or mood.
characterized by or expressing gloom.

Morose

776

—noun, plural cas·u·al·ties.

Military.
a member of the armed forces lost to service through death, wounds, sickness, capture, or because his or her whereabouts or condition cannot be determined.
casualties, loss in numerical strength through any cause, as death, wounds, sickness, capture, or desertion.
one who is injured or killed in an accident: There were no casualties in the traffic accident.
any person, group, thing, etc., that is harmed or destroyed as a result of some act or event: Their house was a casualty of the fire.
a serious accident, especially one involving bodily injury or death.

Casualty

777

a wharf laborer or deck hand, as on the Mississippi River.
an unskilled laborer who lives by odd jobs.
a circus laborer who helps in setting up and taking down the tents and in caring for the animals, equipment, and grounds.
any unskilled laborer working in an oil field. Compare roughneck (def 2).

Roustabout

778

the act of carrying; carriage.
the carrying of boats, goods, etc., overland from one navigable water to another.
the route over which this is done.
the cost of carriage.
—verb (used without object), por·taged, por·tag·ing.

to make a portage: On this stretch of the river, we have to portage for a mile.
—verb (used with object), por·taged, por·tag·ing.

to carry (something) over a portage; make a portage with: We portaged our canoe around the rapids.

Portage

779

a broad elevation or mound of earth raised as a fortification around a place and usually capped with a stone or earth parapet.
such an elevation together with the parapet.
anything serving as a bulwark or defense.

Rampart

780

a wall of earth or other material built for defense; rampart.

Bulwark

781

a person who displays or demands of others pointlessly precise conformity, fussiness about trivialities, or exaggerated propriety, especially in a self-righteous or irritating manner.

Prig

782

haughtily disdainful or contemptuous, as a person or a facial expression.

Supercilious

783

to render (water, wine, etc.) turbid by stirring up sediment.
to disturb or disquiet; irritate; vex: to be roiled by a delay.
—verb (used without object)

to move or proceed turbulently.

Roil

784

incitement of discontent or rebellion against a government.
any action, especially in speech or writing, promoting such discontent or rebellion.

Sedition

785

knowledge of things before they exist or happen; foreknowledge; foresight

Prescience

786

overcome with worry or anger; distraught.
"she was beside herself with anguish"

Beside oneself

787

Sworn to secrecy

Trusted to keep a secret

788

Bold and daring feat

Exploit

789

settled or confirmed in a habit, practice, feeling, or the like: an inveterate gambler.
firmly established by long continuance, as a disease, habit, practice, feeling, etc.; chronic.

Inveterate

790

to do away with; put an end to; annul; make void: to abolish slavery

Abolish

791

precisely, correctly, or perfectly.
exactly on time: We made it at ten o'clock on the nose.
(of a bet) for win only.
Australian Informal. decayed or putrid; stinking.
Australian Informal. distasteful or unpleasant; of doubtful validity or propriety.

On the nose

792

to weary; tire; exhaust (often followed by out ): The game tuckered him out.

Tucker

793

a substance secreted in a glandular sac under the skin of the abdomen of the male musk deer, having a strong odor, and used in perfumery.
an artificial imitation of the substance.
a similar secretion of other animals, as the civet, muskrat, and otter.
the odor of musk or some similar odor.
Botany. any of several plants, as the monkey flower, having a musky fragrance.

Musk

794

a person, especially a man, who solicits customers for a prostitute or a brothel, usually in return for a share of the earnings; pander; procurer.
a despicable person.

Pimp

795

Call it a wrap/it's a wrap

Call it a night/this is successfully completed

796

to caress, fondle, or pet amorously

Canoodle

797

pleasantly calm or peaceful; unruffled; tranquil; serenely quiet or undisturbed: placid waters.

Placid

798

having an odor or flavor suggestive of mold, as old buildings, long-closed rooms, or stale food.
obsolete; outdated; antiquated: musty laws.
dull; apathetic

Musty

799

producing or capable of producing offspring, fruit, vegetation, etc., in abundance; prolific; fruitful: fecund parents; fecund farmland.
very productive or creative intellectually: the fecund years of the Italian Renaissance.

Fecund

800

to leave in an uncomfortable or desperate situation; desert in time of trouble: Our best salesperson left us in the lurch at the peak of the busy season.

Leave in a lurch

801

usually lowercase) pertaining to or characteristic of a sybarite; characterized by or loving luxury or sensuous pleasure: to wallow in sybaritic splendor.

Sybaritic

802

having a rank, unpleasant, stale smell or taste, as through decomposition, especially of fats or oils: rancid butter.
(of an odor or taste) rank, unpleasant, and stale: a rancid smell.
offensive or nasty; disagreeable.

Rancid

803

a metamorphic rock, generally made up of bands that differ in color and composition, some bands being rich in feldspar and quartz, others rich in hornblende or mica.

Gneiss

804

to strike and rebound

Carom

805

to make or use gestures, especially in an animated or excited manner with or instead of speech.

Gesticulate

806

to bewilder; confound; confuse

Flummoxed

807

to fill or close seams or crevices of (a tank, window, etc.) in order to make watertight, airtight, etc.
to make (a vessel) watertight by filling the seams between the planks with oakum or other material driven snug.

Caulk

808

revolt or rebellion against constituted authority, especially by sailors against their officers.
rebellion against any authority.

Mutiny

809

to hold or bind by or as if by a spell; enchant; entrance; fascinate.

Spellbind

810

a great wave or surge of the sea.
any surging mass: billows of smoke.
—verb (used without object)

to rise or roll in or like billows; surge.
to swell out, puff up, etc., as by the action of wind: flags billowing in the breeze.
—verb (used with object)

to make rise, surge, swell, or the like: A sudden wind billowed the tent alarmingly.

Billow

811

inclined to silence; reserved in speech; reluctant to join in conversation.
dour, stern, and silent in expression and manner.

Taciturn

812

a small steep-sided watercourse or gulch with a nearly flat floor: usually dry except after heavy rains.

Gulch

813

to roll about or lie in water, snow, mud, dust, or the like, as for refreshment: Goats wallowed in the dust.
to live self-indulgently; luxuriate; revel: to wallow in luxury; to wallow in sentimentality.
to flounder about; move along or proceed clumsily or with difficulty: A gunboat wallowed toward port.
to surge up or billow forth, as smoke or heat: Waves of black smoke wallowed into the room.

Wallow

814

former; of times past: erstwhile friends.

Erstwhile

815

well-suited for the occasion, as an action, manner, or expression; apt; appropriate: The chairman's felicitous anecdote set everyone at ease.
having a special ability for suitable manner or expression, as a person.

Felicitous

816

a long, precipitous, clifflike ridge of land, rock, or the like, commonly formed by faulting or fracturing of the earth's crust. Compare scarp (def 1).
ground cut into an escarp around a fortification or defensive position.

Escarpment

817

generous in forgiving an insult or injury; free from petty resentfulness or vindictiveness: to be magnanimous toward one's enemies.
high-minded; noble: a just and magnanimous ruler.
proceeding from or revealing generosity or nobility of mind, character, etc.: a magnanimous gesture of forgiveness.

Magnanimois

818

to gain weight: He realized to his dismay that he had fleshed out during the months of forced inactivity.
to add details to or make more complete: She fleshed out her proposal considerably before presenting it to the committee for action.

Flesh out

819

an abnormal condition resulting from a previous disease.

Sequels

820

a sudden, unpredictable change, as of one's mind or the weather.
a tendency to change one's mind without apparent or adequate motive; whimsicality; capriciousness: With the caprice of a despotic king, he alternated between kindness and cruelty.

Caprice

821

to speak aloud in an oratorical manner; make a formal speech: Brutus declaimed from the steps of the Roman senate building.
to inveigh (usually followed by against ): He declaimed against the high rents in slums.
to speak or write for oratorical effect, as without sincerity or sound argument.

Declaim

822

to protest strongly or attack vehemently with words; rail (usually followed by against ): to inveigh against isolationism.

Inveigh

823

a rich, friable soil containing a relatively equal mixture of sand and silt and a somewhat smaller proportion of clay.

Loan

824

easily crumbled or reduced to powder; crumbly: friable rock.

Friable

825

growing with excessive luxuriance; vigorous and tall of growth: tall rank weeds.
producing an excessive and coarse growth, as land.
having an offensively strong smell or taste: a rank cigar.
offensively strong, as a smell or taste.
utter; absolute: a rank amateur; rank treachery.

Ranks

826

providing or yielding meagerly in return for much effort; demanding or unrewarding: the hardscrabble existence of mountainside farmers

Hardscrabble

827

Pittance

small amount or share.
a small allowance or sum, as of money for living expenses.
a scanty income or remuneration

828

a source of great and sudden wealth or luck; a spectacular windfall: The play proved to be a bonanza for its lucky backers.

Bonanza

829

an unexpected gain, piece of good fortune, or the like.
something blown down by the wind, as fruit.

Windfall

830

a letter, advertisement, notice, or statement for circulation among the general public.

Circular

831

the heart, liver, and lungs, especially of an animal used for food.
courage or resolution in the face of difficulties.

Pluck

832

warmly and pleasantly cheerful; cordial: a genial disposition; a genial host.
favorable for life, growth, or comfort; pleasantly warm; comfortably mild: the genial climate of Hawaii.
characterized by genius.

Genial

833

to be surrounded by one's disciples or admirers, giving advice, exchanging gossip, receiving compliments, etc.

Hold court

834

in the state of being towed.
under one's guidance; in one's charge.
as a follower, admirer, or companion: a professor who always had a graduate student in tow.

In tow

835

practicing usury; charging illegal or exorbitant rates of interest for the use of money: a usurious moneylender.
constituting or characterized by usury: usurious rates of interest; a usurious loan.

Usurious

836

something improvised in speech, music, etc.: Was that joke part of your speech or an ad lib?

Ad lib

837

Courage in pain and adversity

Fortitude

838

lack of discretion; imprudence.
an indiscreet act, remark, etc.

Indiscretion

839

turned or turning away from what is right or proper; willful; disobedient: a wayward son; wayward behavior.
swayed or prompted by caprice; capricious: a wayward impulse; to be wayward in one's affections.
turning or changing irregularly; irregular: a wayward breeze.

Wayward

840

belonging or pertaining to the common people.
of, relating to, or belonging to the ancient Roman plebs.
common, commonplace, or vulgar: a plebeian joke.

Plebeian

841

Breadbasket

Part of a region that produces cereals for the rest of it

842

Not celebrated or praised

Unsung

843

an unexpected and inexplicable change in a situation or in someone's behavior

Vagary

844

Proffer

Hold out something to someone for acceptance; offer

845

a person who professes his or her patriotism loudly and excessively, favoring vigilant preparedness for war and an aggressive foreign policy; bellicose chauvinist.

Jingo

846

inclined or eager to fight; aggressively hostile; belligerent; pugnacious.

Bellicose

847

inclined to quarrel or fight readily; quarrelsome; belligerent; combative.

Pugnacious

848

a person who is aggressively and blindly patriotic, especially one devoted to military glory.
a person who believes one gender is superior to the other, as a male chauvinist or a female chauvinist.

Chauvinist

849

an empty, voluble, pretentious talker.

Windbag

850

characterized by a ready and continuous flow of words; fluent; glib; talkative: a voluble spokesman for the cause.

Voluble

851

a stupid person; dunce

Booby

852

not based on prior study or examination; nonanalytic: an a priori judgment.

A priori

853

to arrange in or according to a system; reduce to a system; make systematic.

Systematize

854

pertaining to or produced by galvanism; producing or caused by an electric current.
affecting or affected as if by galvanism; startling; shocking: the galvanic effect of his speech.
stimulating; energizing: Her galvanic presence brought the party to life.

Galvanic

855

family, class, or kind: he and all his ilk.
—adjective

same.
—Idioms

of that ilk,
(in Scotland) of the same family name or place: Ross of that ilk, i.e., Ross of Ross.

Ilk

856

acknowledged; declared: an avowed enemy.

Avowed

857

History/Historical. one of a class of lesser freeholders, below the gentry, who cultivated their own land, early admitted in England to political rights.

Yeoman

858

to alter; change

Permute

859

refusing to agree or compromise; uncompromising; inflexible.

Intransigent

860

to settle (disputes, strikes, etc.) as an intermediary between parties; reconcile.
to bring about (an agreement, accord, truce, peace, etc.) as an intermediary between parties by compromise, reconciliation, removal of misunderstanding, etc.
to effect (a result) or convey (a message, gift, etc.) by or as if by an intermediary.
—verb (used without object), me·di·at·ed, me·di·at·ing.

to act between parties to effect an agreement, compromise, reconciliation, etc.
to occupy an intermediate place or position.

Mediate

861

a person who spends possessions or money extravagantly or wastefully; prodigal.
—adjective

wastefully extravagant; prodigal.

Spendthrift

862

wastefully or recklessly extravagant: prodigal expenditure.
giving or yielding profusely; lavish (usually followed by of or with ): prodigal of smiles; prodigal with money.
lavishly abundant; profuse: nature's prodigal resources.
—noun

a person who spends, or has spent, his or her money or substance with wasteful extravagance; spendthrift.

Prodigal

863

tending to promote some proposed or desired object; fit or suitable for the purpose; proper under the circumstances: It is expedient that you go.
conducive to advantage or interest, as opposed to right.
acting in accordance with expediency, or what is advantageous.
—noun

a means to an end: The ladder was a useful expedient for getting to the second floor.
a means devised or employed in an exigency; resource; shift: Use any expedients you think necessary to get over the obstacles in your way.

Expedient

864

exigent state or character; urgency.
Usually, exigencies. the need, demand, or requirement intrinsic to a circumstance, condition, etc.: the exigencies of city life.
a case or situation that demands prompt action or remedy; emergency: He promised help in any exigency.

Exigency

865

shrewd or prudent in practical matters; tactful; diplomatic.
contrived in a shrewd and practical way; expedient: a politic reply.
political: the body politic.

Politic

866

deserving intense dislike

Detestable

867

a representative sent on a mission or errand: emissaries to negotiate a peace.
an agent sent on a mission of a secret nature, as a spy.
Anatomy. sending or coming out, as certain veins that pass through the skull and connect the venous sinuses inside with the veins outside.
pertaining to an emissary.

Emissary

868

Graft

the acquisition of money, gain, or advantage by dishonest, unfair, or illegal means, especially through the abuse of one's position or influence in politics, business, etc.
a particular instance, method, or means of thus acquiring gain or advantage.
the gain or advantage acquired.

869

to renounce or relinquish a throne, right, power, claim, responsibility, or the like, especially in a formal manner: The aging founder of the firm decided to abdicate.

Abdicate

870

to die or be destroyed through violence, privation, etc.: to perish in an earthquake.
to pass away or disappear: an age of elegance that has forever perished.
to suffer destruction or ruin: His valuable paintings perished in the fire.
to suffer spiritual death: Save us, lest we perish.

Perish

871

a person, especially a child, who has no home or friends.
something found, especially a stray animal, whose owner is not known.
a very thin, often small person, usually a young woman.
a stray item or article: to gather waifs of gossip.

Waif

872

A group of individuals or organizations combined to promote some common interest

An association of agency supplying material simultaneously to a number of newspapers or periodicals

Verb
Control or manage by a syndicate

Publish or broadcast simultaneously in a number of newspapers, television stations

Syndicate

873

Masturbatory

Stimulating ones own genitals

874

Select from a large quantity; obtain from a variety of sources

Reduce population of a wild animal by selective slaughtering

Pick flowers or fruit

Noun
A selective slaughter of wild animals

Cull

875

oral stimulation of the penis, especially to orgasm.

Fellatio

876

to make less offensive by eliminating anything unwholesome, objectionable, incriminating, etc.: to sanitize a document before releasing it to the press.

Sanitize

877

well-suited for the occasion, as an action, manner, or expression; apt; appropriate: The chairman's felicitous anecdote set everyone at ease.
having a special ability for suitable manner or expression, as a person.

Felicitous

878

eminent above or before others; superior; surpassing: He is preeminent in his profession.

Preeminent

879

high in station, rank, or repute; prominent; distinguished: eminent statesmen.
conspicuous, signal, or noteworthy: eminent fairness.
lofty; high: eminent peaks.
prominent; projecting; protruding: an eminent nose.

Eminent

880

showing great enthusiasm for or interest in: an avid moviegoer. Synonyms: enthusiastic, ardent, keen; devoted, dedicated; zealous, fanatic. Antonyms: indifferent, apathetic; reluctant.
extremely desirous (often followed by for or sometimes of ): avid for pleasure; avid of power. Synonyms: eager; hungry, greedy, insatiable; covetous. Antonyms: disdainful, loath

Avid

881

a depraved, unprincipled, or wicked person: a drunken reprobate.
a person rejected by God and beyond hope of salvation.
—adjective

morally depraved; unprincipled; bad.
rejected by God and beyond hope of salvation.
—verb (used with object), rep·ro·bat·ed, rep·ro·bat·ing.

to disapprove, condemn, or censure.
(of God) to reject (a person), as for sin; exclude from the number of the elect or from salvation.

Reprobate

882

violent in action or spirit; raging; furious: a rampant leopard.
growing luxuriantly, as weeds.
in full sway; prevailing or unchecked: a rampant rumor.
(of an animal) standing on the hind legs; ramping

Rampant

883

In a pinch

In a critical situation, if absolutely necessary

884

Provide evidence to support or prove the truth of

Substantiate

885

expression; utterance; release: to give vent to one's emotions.

Give vent to ones emotions

886

a person of great influence, importance, or standing in a particular enterprise, field of business, etc.: a railroad magnate.
a person of eminence or distinction in any field: literary magnates.

Eminent

887

of the nature of a portent; momentous.
ominously significant or indicative: a portentous defeat.
marvelous; amazing; prodigious.

Portentous

888

extraordinary in size, amount, extent, degree, force, etc.: a prodigious research grant.
wonderful or marvelous: a prodigious feat.
abnormal; monstrous.

Prodigious

889

to work havoc upon; damage or mar by ravages: a face ravaged by grief.
—verb (used without object), rav·aged, rav·ag·ing.

to work havoc; do ruinous damage.
—noun

havoc; ruinous damage: the ravages of war.
devastating or destructive action.

Ravage

890


to bring to a particular degree of intensity of feeling, excitement, energy, nervousness, agitation, etc.: keyed up over the impending test.

Keyed up

891

the temperature or state of something that is so hot that it emits white light.
a state of intense passion or activity.

White heat

892

of, pertaining to, characteristic of, or befitting a man; masculine; manly: virile strength.
having or exhibiting masculine energy, forcefulness, or strength in a marked degree.
characterized by a vigorous, masculine spirit: a virile literary style.
of, relating to, or capable of procreation.

Virile

893

to amend by removing words, passages, etc., deemed offensive or objectionable: Most children read an expurgated version of Grimms' fairy tales.
to purge or cleanse of moral offensiveness.

Expurgate

894

to humble oneself or act in an abject manner, as in great fear or utter servility.
to lie or crawl with the face downward and the body prostrate, especially in abject humility, fear, etc.
to take pleasure in mean or base things.

Grovel

895

that cannot be doubted; patently evident or certain; unquestionable.

Indubitable

896

djective

extending back beyond memory, record, or knowledge: from time immemorial.

Immemorial

897

Dalliance

A casual romantic or sexual relationship

A brief or casual involvement in something

898

Ribald

Referring to sexual matters in a rude or irreverent way

899

Magnanimous

Very generous or giving especially to a rival or to someone wth lesser power

900

Pontificate

Express ones Opinipn in a way considered annoyingly pompous or dogmatic

901

without people; uninhabited.
Origin: 1580–90; un-1 + peopled

unpeople
—verb (used with object), un·peo·pled, un·peo·pling.

to deprive of people; depopulate.

Unpeopled

902

to expel from or relegate to a country or place by authoritative decree; condemn to exile: He was banished to Devil's Island.
to compel to depart; send, drive, or put away: to banish sorrow.

Banish

903

to remain; continue; stay: Abide with me.
to have one's abode; dwell; reside: to abide in a small Scottish village.
to continue in a particular condition, attitude, relationship, etc.; last.
—verb (used with object), a·bode or a·bid·ed, a·bid·ing.

to put up with; tolerate; stand: I can't abide dishonesty!
to endure, sustain, or withstand without yielding or submitting: to abide a vigorous onslaught.
to wait for; await: to abide the coming of the Lord.
to accept without opposition or question: to abide the verdict of the judges.
to pay the price or penalty of; suffer for.
—Verb phrases

abide by,
to act in accord with.

Abide

904

offensive to good taste, especially as being excessive; overdone or gross: fulsome praise that embarrassed her deeply; fulsome décor.
disgusting; sickening; repulsive: a table heaped with fulsome mounds of greasy foods.
excessively or insincerely lavish: fulsome admiration.
encompassing all aspects; comprehensive: a fulsome survey of the political situation in Central America.
abundant or copious.

Fulsome

905

extravagantly chivalrous or romantic; visionary, impractical, or impracticable.
impulsive and often rashly unpredictable.

Quixotic

906

Ignominy

Public shame or disgrace

907

to turn to dust by natural decay; crumble; disintegrate; waste away: a house that had been left to molder.

Molder

908

characterized by or causing pain, distress, or grief; distressing

Afflictive

909

The action of conducting a discussion of an argument so as to avoid the direct mention of something

Fencing

910

dexterous; nimble; skillful; clever: deft hands; a deft mechanic.

Deft

911

a short period after a nerve or muscle cell fires during which the cell cannot respond to additional stimulation.

Refractory period

912

hard or impossible to manage; stubbornly disobedient: a refractory child.
resisting ordinary methods of treatment.
difficult to fuse, reduce, or work, as an ore or metal.

Refractory

913

a rich mass of ore, as found in mining.
a source of great and sudden wealth or luck; a spectacular windfall: The play proved to be a bonanza for its lucky backers.

Bonanza

914

a rich mass of ore, as found in mining.
a source of great and sudden wealth or luck; a spectacular windfall: The play proved to be a bonanza for its lucky backers.

Torpid

915

to produce or discharge pus, as a wound; maturate.

Suppurate

916

material or refuse floating on water.
useless or unimportant items; odds and ends.
a vagrant, penniless population: the flotsam of the city slums in medieval Europe.

Flotsam

917

displaying the effect of excessive indulgence in sensual pleasure: a flabby and debauched face.
corrupted; debased: debauched morals.

Debauched

918

political control by a mob.
the mob as a ruling class.

Mobocracy

919

something that completes or makes perfect: A good wine is a complement to a good meal.
the quantity or amount that completes anything: We now have a full complement of packers.
either of two parts or things needed to complete the whole; counterpart.
full quantity or amount; complete allowance.

Complement

920

not controvertible; not open to question or dispute; indisputable: absolute and incontrovertible truth.

Incontrovertible

921

Co-opt

Adopt an idea or policy for owns own use

922

Lacking in color, spirit, vitality

Anemic

923

Assuage

Make an unpleasant feeling less intense

Satisfy an appetite or desire

924

Mainstay

A thing on which something else is based or depends

925

Rife with

Full of

926

that galls; chafing; irritating; vexing; exasperating.

Galling

927

shameless or impudent boldness; barefaced audacity: She had the effrontery to ask for two free samples.
an act or instance of this.

Effrontery

928

dull and uninspired.

Stodgy

929

an inference or a conclusion that does not follow from the premises.
a statement containing an illogical conclusion.

Non sequitur

930

Lap up

Informal. to receive enthusiastically: The audience lapped up his monologue.
to take in (all of a liquid) with the tongue; drink up: The cat lapped up her milk and looked for more.

931

an office or position requiring little or no work, especially one yielding profitable returns.

Sinecure

932

refusing to agree or compromise; uncompromising; inflexible.

Intransigent

933

Physiology, Pathology. pertaining to bile or to an excess secretion of bile.
Pathology. suffering from, caused by, or attended by trouble with the bile or liver.
peevish; irritable; cranky.
extremely unpleasant or distasteful: a long scarf of bright, bilious green.

Bilious

934

very fervent; extremely ardent; impassioned: perfervid patriotism.

Perfervid

935

strong, well-developed muscles.
muscular strength.

Brawn

936

without means of subsistence; lacking food, clothing, and shelter.
deprived of, devoid of, or lacking (often followed by of ): destitute of children.

Destitute

937

no longer in effect or use; not operating or functioning: a defunct law; a defunct organization.
no longer in existence; dead; extinct: a defunct person; a defunct tribe of Indians.

Defunct

938

to search or explore (a region), as for gold.
to work (a mine or claim) experimentally in order to test its value.
—verb (used without object)

to search or explore a region for gold or the like.

Prospecting

939

Churlish

like a churl; boorish; rude: churlish behavior.
of a churl; peasantlike.
niggardly; mean.
difficult to work or deal with, as soil.

940

extending over a great distance.
widely disbursed or distributed.

Far-flung

941

of no essential consequence; unimportant.
not pertinent; irrelevant.
not material; incorporeal; spiritual.

Immaterial

942

a successful, flourishing, or thriving condition, especially in financial respects; good fortune.
prosperities, prosperous circumstances, characterized by financial success or good fortune.

Prosperity

943

brilliant or gorgeous appearance, coloring, etc.; magnificence: the splendor of the palace.
an instance or display of imposing pomp or grandeur: the splendor of the coronation.
grandeur; glory; brilliant distinction: the splendor of ancient Greek architecture.
great brightness; brilliant light or luster.
—verb (used with object)

to make splendid by decorating lavishly; adorn.
—verb (used without object)

to move or proceed with splendor, grandeur, or pomp.

Splendor

944

a general outburst of enthusiasm, excitement, controversy, or the like.
a prevailing fad, mania, or craze.
fury; rage; madness.

Furor

945

deliberately faithless; treacherous; deceitful: a perfidious lover.

Perfidious

946

A person who acts obsequiously toward someone important in order to gain advatage

Sycophant

947

Obsequious

Obedient or attentive to an excessive or servile degree

948

Malarkey

Meaningless talk, nonsense

949

to remove or destroy totally; do away with; exterminate.
to pull up by or as if by the roots; root up: to extirpate an unwanted hair.

Extirpate

950

Sully

Damage the purity or integrity of, defile

951

get a word in edgewise, to succeed in entering a conversation or expressing one's opinion in spite of competition or opposition: There were so many people talking at once that I couldn't get a word in edgewise.

Get a word in edgewise

952

to observe; look at; see.
—interjection

look; see: And, behold, three sentries of the King did appear.

Behold

953

oblique or ambiguous in meaning; indirect; insincere or malicious; wry: backhanded methods; a backhanded compliment.

Backhanded

954

Express an opinion or grievance publicly, display

Air

955

Part and parcel of

Eseential, necessary, or integral part

956

a situation or problem presenting such difficulties as to discourage or defeat any attempt to deal with or resolve it.
—verb (used with object), sty·mied, sty·mie·ing.

to hinder, block, or thwart.

Stymie

957

to deceive or get the better of (someone) by trickery, flattery, or the like; humbug; hoodwink (often followed by into ): They bamboozled us into joining the club. Synonyms: gyp, dupe, trick, cheat, swindle, defraud, flimflam, hoax, gull, rook; delude, mislead, fool.
to perplex; mystify; confound. Synonyms: befog, bewilder, puzzle, baffle, dumbfound.
—verb (used without object), bam·boo·zled, bam·boo·zling.

to practice trickery, deception, cozenage, or the like: He bamboozled his way to the top.

Bamboozle

958

to show clearly; make evident or manifest; prove.
to reveal the possession of (a quality, trait, etc.).

Evince

959

Beguile

Charm or enchant, sometimes in a deceptive way

Help time pass pleasantly

960

merely touching; slightly connected: tangential information.
divergent or digressive, as from a subject under consideration: tangential remarks.
tending to digress or to reply to questions obliquely.

Tangential

961

a branch of philosophy that investigates the origin, nature, methods, and limits of human knowledge.

Epistemilogy

962

burdensome, oppressive, or troublesome; causing hardship: onerous duties.
having or involving obligations or responsibilities, especially legal ones, that outweigh the advantages: an onerous agreement.

Onerous

963

Ferret something out

Search tenaciously for and find something

964

Flesh something out

Add more details to something that exists only in a draft or outline form

965

an artifice or expedient used to evade a rule, escape a consequence, hide something, etc.

Subterfuge

966

lacking confidence in one's own ability, worth, or fitness; timid; shy.
restrained or reserved in manner, conduct, etc.

Diffident

967

vulgar or indecent in speech, language, etc.; coarsely mocking, abusive, or irreverent; scurrilous.

Ribald

968

seat-of-the-pants. adjective. Informal. Based on or using intuition and experience rather than a plan or method.

Seat of the pants

969

trickery or deception by quibbling or sophistry: He resorted to the worst flattery and chicanery to win the job.
a quibble or subterfuge used to trick, deceive, or evade.

Chicanery

970

a subtle, tricky, superficially plausible, but generally fallacious method of reasoning.
a false argument; sophism.

Sophistry

971

failing to succeed; unsuccessful: an abortive rebellion; an abortive scheme.
born prematurely.
imperfectly developed; rudimentary

Abortive

972

to close, shut, or stop up (a passage, opening, etc.).
to shut in, out, or off.

Occlude

973

a compact portion of a mountain range, containing one or more summits.
a large elevated block of old complex rocks resistant to both erosion and crustal folding.
a band or zone of the earth's crust raised or depressed as a unit and bounded by faults.

Massif

974

a sudden, usually marked loss of bodily function due to rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel.
a hemorrhage into an organ cavity or tissue.
a state of extreme anger.

Apoplexy

975

the act of departing from the right, normal, or usual course.
the act of deviating from the ordinary, usual, or normal type.
deviation from truth or moral rectitude.
mental irregularity or disorder, especially of a minor or temporary nature; lapse from a sound mental state.

Aberration

976

not seemly; not in keeping with established standards of taste or proper form; unbecoming or indecorous in appearance, speech, conduct, etc.: an unseemly act; unseemly behavior.
inappropriate for time or place: an unseemly hour.

Unseemly

977

hit or wounded by a weapon, missile, or the like.
beset or afflicted, as with disease, trouble, or sorrow: stricken areas; a stricken family.
deeply affected, as with grief, fear, or other emotions.
characterized by or showing the effects of affliction, trouble, misfortune, a mental blow, etc.: stricken features.

Stricken

978

diligent in application or attention; persevering; assiduous.
persistently or carefully maintained: sedulous flattery.

Sedulous

979

to persuade by flattery or promises; wheedle; coax.

Cajole

980

any rule restricting open discussion or debate concerning a given issue, especially in a deliberative body.

Gag rule

981

to deceive or trick

Hoodwink

982

free from guile; sincere; honest; straightforward; frank.

Guileless

983

insidious cunning in attaining a goal; crafty or artful deception; duplicity.

Guile

984

an unsophisticated person from a rural area; hick.

Rube

985

silly; weak-minded; crazy.

Daffy

986

given to using long words.
(of a word) containing many syllables.
—noun

a sesquipedalian word.

Sesquipedalian

987

to change repeatedly one's attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc.; equivocate.
to turn renegade.

Tergiversate

988

peevish; irritable; cranky.
extremely unpleasant or distasteful: a long scarf of bright, bilious green.

Bilious

989

a short, heavy club with one end weighted, or thicker and heavier than the other.
—verb (used with object)

to strike or knock down with a bludgeon.
to force into something; coerce; bully: The boss finally bludgeoned him into accepting responsibility.

Bludgeon

990

a prostitute; whore.

Harlot

991

No mean feat

To be a considerably great, difficult, or noteworthy achievement or outcome

992

vehement or violent denunciation, censure, or reproach.
a railing accusation; vituperation.
an insulting or abusive word or expression.
—adjective

vituperative; denunciatory; censoriously abusive.

Invective

993

verbal abuse or castigation; violent denunciation or condemnation.

Vituperation

994

done, spoken, performed, etc., without special advance preparation; impromptu: an extemporaneous speech.
previously planned but delivered with the help of few or no notes: extemporaneous lectures.
speaking or performing with little or no advance preparation: extemporaneous actors.
made for the occasion, as a shelter.

Extemporaneous

995

dregs, the sediment of liquids; lees; grounds.
Usually, dregs. the least valuable part of anything: the dregs of society.
a small remnant; any small quantity.

Dregs

996

becoming putrid; undergoing putrefaction.
of or relating to putrefaction.

Putrescent

997

Anathema

Something or someone one vehemently dislikes

998

a person or thing that expounds, explains, or interprets: an exponent of modern theory in the arts.
a person or thing that is a representative, advocate, type, or symbol of something: Lincoln is an exponent of American democracy.

Exponent

999

Cuckold

Husband of an adulteress

Of a man make another man a cuckold by having a sexual relationship with his wife

Of a mans wife make her husband a cuckold

1000

to feel sorrow over; repent of; regret bitterly: to rue the loss of opportunities.
to wish that (something) had never been done, taken place, etc.: I rue the day he was born.
—verb (used without object), rued, ru·ing.

to feel sorrow, repentance, or regret.
—noun

sorrow; repentance; regret.
pity or compassion.

Rue

1001

Rile

to irritate or vex.
to roil (water or the like).

1002

Abiding

Lasting a long time, enduring

1003

Inexorable

Impossible to stop or prevent

Of a person impossible to persuade by request or entreaty

1004

Quiescent

In a state or period of inactivity or dormancy

1005

Hot air

Brag; empty, exaggerated talk

1006

to speak harmful untruths about; speak evil of; slander; defame: to malign an honorable man.

Malign

1007

a strike by a missile that is not a direct hit but is close enough to damage the target.
an instance of two vehicles, aircraft, etc., narrowly avoiding a collision.
something that falls narrowly short of its object or of success: an interesting movie, but a near miss.

Near miss

1008

of pleasing personal appearance; handsome or comely; attractive.
having an agreeable or pleasing personality; affable; amiable; sociable

Personable

1009

Root out and destroy completely

Extirpate

1010

a person of profound or extensive learning; learned scholar.

Savant

1011

to bet or gamble (an original amount and its winnings) on a subsequent race, contest, etc.
Informal. to use (one's money, talent, or other assets) to achieve a desired objective, as spectacular wealth or success: He parlayed a modest inheritance into a fortune.

Parlay

1012

to carry in the womb during the period from conception to delivery.
to think of and develop (an idea, opinion, plan, etc.) slowly in the mind.

Gestate

1013

to persuade by flattery or promises; wheedle; coax.

Cajole

1014

a deplorably unfortunate or unhappy person.
a person of despicable or base character.

Wretch

1015

to scold; rebuke: He berated them in public.

Berate

1016

not operative; not in operation.
without effect: inoperative remedies.
no longer in effect; void; canceled: The earlier rule is now inoperative.

Inoperative

1017

lying or believed to lie beneath the earth's surface; infernal: the nether regions.
lower or under: his nether lip.

Nether

1018

to tear roughly; mangle: The barbed wire lacerated his hands.
to distress or torture mentally or emotionally; wound deeply; pain greatly: His bitter criticism lacerated my heart.

Lacerate

1019

superior in weight, force, influence, numbers, etc.; prevailing: a preponderant misconception.

Preponderant

1020

Reject someone or something in an abrupt or ungracious manner

An abrupt or ungracious refusal or rejection of an offer request or friendly gesture

Rebuff

1021

to carry; lug: to schlep an umbrella on a sunny day.
—verb (used without object), schlepped, schlep·ping.

to move slowly, awkwardly, or tediously: We schlepped from store to store all day.

Schlep

1022

a domed circular temple at Rome, erected a.d. 120–124 by Hadrian, used as a church since a.d.
(lowercase) a public building containing tombs or memorials of the illustrious dead of a nation.
(lowercase) the place of the heroes or idols of any group, individual, movement, party, etc., or the heroes or idols themselves: to earn a place in the pantheon of American literature.
(lowercase) a temple dedicated to all the gods.
(lowercase) the gods of a particular mythology considered collectively.

Pantheon

1023

to carry in the womb during the period from conception to delivery.
to think of and develop (an idea, opinion, plan, etc.) slowly in the mind

Gestate

1024

to sacrifice.
to kill as a sacrificial victim, as by fire; offer in sacrifice.
to destroy by fire.

Immolate

1025

wary; suspicious (usually followed by of ): I'm leery of his financial advice.
Archaic. knowing; alert.

Leery

1026

Extemporaneous

Spoken or done without preparation

1027

Fawn

Of a person give a servile display of exaggerated flattery or affection, typically in order to gain favor or advantage

1028

Rile

Make someone annoyed or irritated

1029

Dance, typically in an energetic or accomplished way

Cut a rug

1030

A sight for sore eyes

Someone or something you are happy to see

1031

Alimony

A husbands or wife's court-ordered provision for a spouse after separation or divorce

1032

Duly noted

Correctly or appropriately recorded

1033

not to be revoked or recalled; unable to be repealed or annulled; unalterable: an irrevocable decree.

Irrevocable

1034

a person who practices deception under an assumed character, identity, or name.

Imposter

1035

Hoopla

Excitement surrounding an event or situation, especially when considered to be unnecessary fuss

1036

Smarmy

Ingratiating and wheedling in a way that is perceived as insincere or excessive

1037

Memento

an object or item that serves to remind one of a person, past event, etc.; keepsake; souvenir.

1038

Sound off

Express ones opinions in a loud and forceful manner

1039

to increase one’s efforts or hold to a position or opinion, especially when vulnerable or taking a risk: He has continued to defend his controversial interpretation of the document, doubling down on what he sees as the truth.

Double down

1040

Pat

Simple and somewhat glib or unconvincing

At the right moment or in the right way

Down pat
Memorized or masters perfectly

1041

Guff

Trivial worthless insolent talk or ideas

1042

Insolent

Sharing a ride or arrogant lack of respect

1043

to cause to be potent; make powerful.
to increase the effectiveness of; intensify.

Potentate

1044

Sully

Damage the purity or integrity of; defile

1045

serving to compensate, as for loss, lack, or injury.
countercyclical.

Compensatory

1046

Commensurate

corresponding in amount, magnitude, or degree: Your paycheck should be commensurate with the amount of time worked.
proportionate; adequate: a solution commensurate to the seriousness of the problem.
having the same measure; of equal extent or duration.

1047

Beleaguered

to surround with military forces.
to surround or beset, as with troubles

1048

Hitch

Temporary interruption or problem

1049

So someone in

To make someone tired

1050

Check out

to verify or become verified; examine or investigate.
to fulfill requirements, as by passing a test: The engine checked out and we proceeded on our way.

1051

come down the pike, Informal. to appear or come forth: the greatest idea that ever came down the pike.

Comedown the pike

1052

Cull

Select from a large quantity; obtain from a variety of resources

Reduce the population of wild animal by selective slaughter

Pick flowers or fruit

1053

Bilious

peevish; irritable; cranky.
extremely unpleasant or distasteful: a long scarf of bright, bilious green.

1054

not to be appeased, mollified, or pacified; inexorable: an implacable enemy.

Implacable

1055

unyielding; unalterable: inexorable truth; inexorable justice.
not to be persuaded, moved, or affected by prayers or entreaties: an inexorable creditor.

Inexorable

1056

Harlot

Prostitute, whore

1057

the act or ceremony of crowning a king, queen, or other sovereign.

Coronation

1058

to invest with ministerial or sacerdotal functions; confer holy orders upon.
to enact or establish by law, edict, etc.: to ordain a new type of government.
to decree; give orders for: He ordained that the restrictions were to be lifted.
(of God, fate, etc.) to destine or predestine: Fate had ordained the meeting.
—verb (used without object)

to order or command: Thus do the gods ordain.
to select for or appoint to an office.
to invest someone with sacerdotal functions.

Ordain

1059

vehement or violent denunciation, censure, or reproach.
a railing accusation; vituperation.
an insulting or abusive word or expression.
—adjective

vituperative; denunciatory; censoriously abusive.

Invective

1060

verbal abuse or castigation; violent denunciation or condemnation.

Vituperation

1061

insatiable greed for riches; inordinate, miserly desire to gain and hoard wealth.

Avarice

1062

a person who lives in wretched circumstances in order to save and hoard money.
a stingy, avaricious person.

Miser

1063

characterized by avarice; greedy; covetous.

Avaricious

1064

any strong or comprehensive attack, as by criticism.

Broadside

1065

to set forth one's position or opinion on some subject in, or as if in, an editorial.
to inject personal interpretations or opinions into an otherwise factual account.

Editorialize

1066

giving premonition; serving to warn beforehand.

Premonitory

1067

to get the better of (other publications, newscasters, etc.) by obtaining and publishing or broadcasting a news item, report, or story first: They scooped all the other dailies with the story of the election fraud.

Scoop

1068

a person or thing that is no longer effective, successful, popular, etc.

Hasbeen

1069

a decline of mental faculties, especially as associated with old age; senility.
excessive fondness; foolish affection

Dotage

1070

Hand in the till

To steal from ones employee

1071

unethical behavior; deceit: When the bank teller bought an expensive car and house, they suspected there might be some hanky-panky going on.
illicit sexual relations.

Hanky-pansy

1072

a group of individuals or organizations combined or making a joint effort to undertake some specific duty or carry out specific transactions or negotiations: The local furniture store is individually owned, but is part of a buying syndicate.

Syndicate

1073

all told, counting everyone or everything; in all: There were 50 guests all told.

All told

1074

oppressive; harsh: a heavy-handed master.
clumsy; graceless: a heavy-handed treatment of the theme.

Heavy handed

1075

Inordinate

not within proper or reasonable limits; immoderate; excessive: He drank an inordinate amount of wine.
unrestrained in conduct, feelings, etc.: an inordinate admirer of beauty.
disorderly; uncontrolled.
not regulated; irregular: inordinate hours.

1076

a brief time for confession or absolution given to a condemned prisoner before his or her execution.
little attention or consideration in dealing with a person or matter: to give short shrift to an opponent's arguments.

Give Short shrift

1077

to force upon or impose fraudulently or unjustifiably (usually followed by on or upon ): to foist inferior merchandise on a customer.
to bring, put, or introduce surreptitiously or fraudulently (usually followed by in or into ): to foist political views into a news story.

Foist

1078

the doing of good; active goodness or kindness; charity.
a beneficent act or gift; benefaction.

Beneficence

1079

being at rest; quiet; still; inactive or motionless: a quiescent mind.

Quiescent

1080

to appropriate as one's own; preempt: The dissidents have coopted the title of her novel for their slogan.

Co-opt

1081

to occupy (land) in order to establish a prior right to buy.
to acquire or appropriate before someone else; take for oneself; arrogate: a political issue preempted by the opposition party.
to take the place of because of priorities, reconsideration, rescheduling, etc.; supplant: The special newscast preempted the usual television program.

Preempt

1082

an alcoholic drink taken before a meal to stimulate the appetite.

Apertif

1083

the art or practice of clipping shrubs or trees into ornamental shapes.
shrubs or trees clipped into ornamental shapes.

Topiary

1084

Erstwhile

Former

1085

to set on end, as a barrel or ship.
to affect drastically or radically, as tastes, opinions, reputations, or systems.
to defeat in competition, as in boxing or business.
—verb (used without object)

to become upended.
to place the body back-end up, as a dabbling duck.

Upend

1086

Salacious

Of writing pictures or talk treating sexual matters in an indecent way and typically conveying undue interest in or enjoyment of the subject

Lustful lecherous

1087

Undue

Unwarranted or inappropriate because excessive or disproportionate

1088

Gobs of

A lot of

1089

Spry

Especially of an old person active lively

1090

extending high in the air; of imposing height; towering: lofty mountains.
exalted in rank, dignity, or character; eminent.
elevated in style, tone, or sentiment, as writings or speech.
arrogantly or condescendingly superior in manner; haughty: to treat someone in a lofty manner.
Nautical. noting a rig of a sailing ship having extraordinarily high masts.
(of fabric or yarn) thick and resilient.

Lofty

1091

a set or system of names or terms, as those used in a particular science or art, by an individual or community, etc.
the names or terms comprising a set or system.

Nomenclature

1092

a person of great influence, importance, or standing in a particular enterprise, field of business, etc.: a railroad magnate.
a person of eminence or distinction in any field: literary magnates.

Magnate

1093

a public exposure or revelation, as of something discreditable: Certain cheap magazines make a fortune out of sensational exposés.

Exposé

1094

to utter a loud, harsh cry; to yelp, squawk, or bawl.
Slang. to talk noisily and foolishly or complainingly.
—noun

a harsh cry.
Slang.
raucous or querulous speech.
a noisy, foolish utterance.

Yawp

1095

to strike or hit hard, with or as with the hand, a stick, or other weapon: She smote him on the back with her umbrella.
to deliver or deal (a blow, hit, etc.) by striking hard.
to strike down, injure, or slay: His sword had smitten thousands.
to afflict or attack with deadly or disastrous effect: smitten by polio.
to affect mentally or morally with a sudden pang: His conscience smote him.

Smite

1096

telling lies, especially habitually; dishonest; lying; untruthful: a mendacious person.
false or untrue: a mendacious report

Mendacious

1097

a conference or discussion.
a long parley, especially one between primitive natives and European traders, explorers, colonial officials, etc.
profuse and idle talk; chatter.
persuasive talk; flattery; cajolery.

Palaver

1098

Parley

a discussion or conference.
an informal conference between enemies under a truce, especially to discuss terms, conditions of surrender, etc.

1099

to show to be false; contradict: His trembling hands belied his calm voice.
to misrepresent: The newspaper belied the facts.
to act unworthily according to the standards of (a tradition, one's ancestry, one's faith, etc.).

Belie

1100

to associate in a fraternal or friendly way.
to associate cordially or intimately with natives of a conquered country, enemy troops, etc.

Fraternize

1101

inclined or eager to fight; aggressively hostile; belligerent; pugnacious.

Bellicose

1102

something that causes fear or worry; bugbear; bogy.

Bugaboo

1103

any source, real or imaginary, of needless fright or fear.
a persistent problem or source of annoyance.

Bugbear

1104

anything that haunts, frightens, annoys, or harasses.

Bogy

1105

in a dying state; near death.
on the verge of extinction or termination.
not progressing or advancing; stagnant: a moribund political party.

Moribund

1106

a command or directive.
an earnest or strongly worded request.

Behest

1107

an adherent or supporter of a person, group, party, or cause, especially a person who shows a biased, emotional allegiance.

Partisan

1108

a person or thing detested or loathed: That subject is anathema to him.
a person or thing accursed or consigned to damnation or destruction.
a formal ecclesiastical curse involving excommunication.
any imprecation of divine punishment.
a curse; execration.

Anathema

1109

water held or forced back, as by a dam, flood, or tide.
a place or state of stagnant backwardness: This area of the country is a backwater that continues to resist progress.
an isolated, peaceful place.
a stroke executed by pushing a paddle forward, causing a canoe to move backward.

Backwater

1110

to force into a specific state or activity: His lack of education condemned him to a life of menial jobs.
to declare incurable.

Condemn

1111

ineffective; incompetent; futile: feckless attempts to repair the plumbing.
having no sense of responsibility; indifferent; lazy.

Feckless

1112

something intended to disguise, conceal, or deceive; camouflage.

Smoke screen

1113

Patrician

a person of noble or high rank; aristocrat.
a person of very good background, education, and refinement.

1114

holding an indicated position, role, office, etc., currently: the incumbent officers of the club.
obligatory (often followed by on or upon ): a duty incumbent upon me.

Necessary as a duty

Incumbent

1115

to explain, worry about, or work at (something) repeatedly or more than is necessary: He kept belaboring the point long after we had agreed.
to assail persistently, as with scorn or ridicule: a book that belabors the provincialism of his contemporaries.
to beat vigorously; ply with heavy blows.

Belabor

1116

(of a man) to make love with a woman one cannot or will not marry; carry on flirtations.