Infection Prevention and Control Flashcards Preview

IDMM > Infection Prevention and Control > Flashcards

Flashcards in Infection Prevention and Control Deck (22):
1

What is the chain of infection?

A image thumb
2

What is a "point of care risk assessment"? (AKA PCRA)

What is the rule of thumb?

Assessement of the risk the patient is to spread an infectious diseaes. 

Rule of thumb: if they are leaking or soiling the environment, limit their movement and protect yourself

3

What are the four moments for hand hygiene?

A image thumb
4

What is the difference between washing with soap and water and alcohol hand rub?

Soap and water removes the organism

alcohol kills the organism

5

Should you wear gloves when touching a rash?

Technically yes. It counts as non-intact skin.

6

When to wear a mask, goggles, a gown?

Whenever there is likely to be splashes of body fluids. 

7

What is the difference between a regular mask and an N95 respirator?

Masks are used for droplet precautions, N95 are used for airborne precautions.

8

What are routine practices?

A image thumb
9

What are some environmental controls?

A image thumb
10

What are some examples of source control?

A image thumb
11

What are AGMPs?

aerosol generating medical procedures: e.g. CPR, intubation, bronchoscopy.

clear non-essential personnel.

12

What are additional precautions? When are they used?

Implemented by nurses... you'll see a sign on the door telling you what PPE you need and how to clean your hand. e.g. C. difficile infection.

Contact precautions (e.g. C. diff)

Droplet precautions (e.g. pertussis)

Airborne precautions (e.g. TB)

Airborne + contact

 

***it's important that these precautions be placed on suspected cases in addition to diagnosed cases***

13

"Epidemiologically significant organisms"

TB

C. diff

antibiotic resistant organisms (AROs)

14

Define

  • HAI
  • SSI
  • VAP
  • CLI
  • CDI
  • ARO

HAI: health care associated infection
SSI: surgical site infection
VAP: ventilator associated pneumonia
CLI: central line infection
CDI: C. diff infection
ARO: antibiotic resistant organism

15

Reportable diseases...some general categories

All food borne illness

Most STI (not HSV or HPV)

Congenital infections

Everything you can be vaccinated against....

Many, many more.

 

Note that there are provincially and nationally reportable disease. 

16

Who is at risk for Hep B?

  • household contacts of Hep B positive individual
  • infants born to infected mothers
  • sexual contacts of Hep B pos. person
  • IVDU
  • MSM
  • health care workers
  • immigrants from endemic countries
  • hemodialysis patients

17

Who is at risk for Hep C?

  • any IVDU
  • HCW following needle stick
  • children born ot Hep C positive mother
  • HIV infection
  • hemodialysis patients

18

Contrast Hep B and Hep C transmission

Hep B: exposure to mucosal fluids

Hep C: primiarly through "large" percutaneous exposure to blood

19

Types of vaccines

A image thumb
20

Children are vaccinated against (14 things!):

tetanus

diphtheria

pertussis

Hep A and B

HiB

polio

pneumococcus

meningitis C

measles mumps rubella

varicella

rotavirus

influenza

HPV

21

Current antibiotic resistant organisms of note

MRSA

VRE

ESBL

CRGNB (carbapenem resistant G(-) bacilli)

Macrolide resistant Strep. pneumoniae

22

What are adverse effects of antibiotic use (not resistance related)?

allergy to AB

association with some other contemporary diseases (e.g. asthma, IBD)