Medicines and the law/prescription writing and signed orders Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Medicines and the law/prescription writing and signed orders Deck (33):
1

when was the medicines act published

1968

2

what does the medicines act 1968 define

three legal categories of medicine

3

what are the three legal categories of medicine that the medicines act 1968 defines

- general sales list medicines (GSL)
- pharmacy medicines (P)
- prescription only medicines (POM)

4

what 2 things does the medicines act 1968 define about the general sales list GSL

- GSL medicines can be sold by a wide range of shops, such as news agents and supermarkets
- often only a small pack size or low strength of the medicine may be sold

5

what does the medicines act 1968 state about the pack size of general sales list medicines of paracetamol in shops

the largest pack size of paracetamol that shops can sell is 16 tablets

6

what does the medicines act 1968 state about the pack size of general sales list medicines of paracetamol in pharmacies

the largest pack size of paracetamol that pharmacies can sell is 32 tablets

7

what does the medicines act 1968 state about the strength of general sales list medicines of ibuprofen in shops

the highest strength of ibuprofen tablets that shops can sell is 200mg

8

what does the medicines act 1968 state about the strength of general sales list medicines of ibuprofen in pharmacies

the highest strength of ibuprofen tablets that shops can sell is 400mg

9

what 2 things does the medicines act 1968 state about pharmacy medicines P

- pharmacy medicines can only be sold from pharmacies and a pharmacist must make or supervise the sale (so pharmacists can intervene if necessary)

- pharmacists may ask patients if they have any medical conditions or take any other medications, to check that it is safe to take the medicine

10

as part of the medicines act 1968 on pharmacy medicines P, what may a pharmacist ask patients and why

if they have any medical conditions or take any other medications
to check that it is safe to take the medicine

11

who were the only 2 groups or people allowed to prescribe when the medicines act 1968 was published?
and who else is also now allowed to legally prescribe since then?

- doctors and dentists

- now several professions can legally prescribe supplementary or independent prescribers including: nurses, pharmacists, pediatrists, physiotherapists etc

12

what does the medicines act 1968 state about prescription only medicines

prescription only medicines cannot be without a prescription from an appropriate prescriber

13

what are some prescription only medicines classed as, and name 3 examples

classed as controlled drugs such as:
morphine, pethidine and methadone

14

what applies to class controlled prescription only medicines

stricter legal controls

15

when did the human medicines regulations come into force and what did it replace

on 14th august 2012 - medicines for human use in the UK
this replaced the medicines act 1968 and subsequent medicines legislation

16

what was the human medicines regulations 2012 the result of

the initiative by the medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency (MHRA) to consolidate and view UK medicines legislation

17

what 2 things does the human medicines regulations 2012 replace

- most of the medicines act 1968
- around 200 statutory instruments in the process

18

what exemptions is now defined within the human medicines regulations 2012

exemptions from the general rules laid down in he medicines act for optometrists

19

what is the 2 exemptions that are now defined within the human medicines regulations 2012 for optometrists which were previously laid down in the medicines act 1968 for optometrists

provided it is in the course of their professional practice, registered optometrists may sell or supply the following medicinal products to a patient:
- all medicinal products on the general sales list GLS
- all P medicines

provided it is in the course of their professional practice and an EMERGENCY, registered optometrists may sell or supply the following POMs:
- 0.5% chloramphenicol eye drops or 1% eye ointment
- cyclopentolate hydrochloride
- fusidic acid
- tropicamide

20

how is an emergency defined in the humans medicines regulations 2012 act and how must it be acted upon by optometrists

there is no legal definition of what is an emergency, so the optom has to make a judgement that there is infact an emergency needed and is in the best interest of the patient

21

which optometrists can sell, supply or write an order for an extended range of medicines
give some examples of medicines

the optometrists who have undergone additional training and are accredited by the general optical council ('additional supply optometrists')

- topical antihistamines
- mast cell stabilisers
- NSAIDS
- mucolytic drugs such as: acetyl cysteine
- atropine
- pilocarpine

22

what is required and what is included in the additional supply 'The medicines regulations SI 2005 No, 1520

4 points

- further training required
- specialist CET for continued accreditation required
- includes drugs previously designated 'entry level'
- includes a number of anti-histamines, mast cell stabilisers and the NSAID diclofenic sodium

23

what 7 things should a signed POM order include

- optometrist's name and address
- date
- name and address of the patient (if applicable)
- name of the drug
- quantity, pharmaceutical form and strength of the POM (e.g. 0.5% eye drops 10ml)
- labelling directions (where applicable)
- original signature of the optometrist

24

what form of ink must the signed POM order be in

indelible ink; this includes typewritten and computer-generated orders i.e. computer generated orders must include the original signature

25

what does the college of optometrists guidance also recommended about signed POM orders

that the optometrist's signature and GOC number should also be included

26

list 4 POM medications for administration (as opposed to sale or supply) containing the following substances that are part of the medicines act exemptions

- amethocaine hydrochloride (tetracaine)
- lignocaine hydrochloride (lidocaine)
- oxybuprocaine hydrochloride (benoxinate)
- proxymetacaine hydrochloride

27

how should a prescription for a medicine be written and what information should it contain

should be written legibly in ink or computer generated and should contain the following information:
- date
- name and address of the patient
- patients age and DOB (a legal requirement in under 12's)
- name of the drug, dose and number of days of treatment required
- prescribers signature

28

what is a legal requirement when writing a prescription for a medicine for someone ages under 12

the patients age and DOB

29

what must happen before a medicine can be used in the uk

it must first be granted a licence

30

what does a licence that must be issued before a medicine can be used in the uk indicate

that all proper checks have been carried out and the benefits of the medicine are believed to outweigh the risks

31

what is a licence that is issued before a medicine can be used in the uk also known as

a marketing authorisation

32

name 2 ways a that licences for medicine can be granted in the uk

- the MHRA which can grant licences for medicines only in the UK
- the European medicines agency (EMEA) which can grant licences for medicines in the European union (EU)

33

list 4 pieces of information that the licence for a medicine includes

- what health condition the medicine should be used to treat
- the dose, form and who can use the medicine e.g. age restrictions
- how long treatment with the medicine should last
- warnings about known safety issues, such as side effects and interactions with other medicines