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Flashcards in Test 1 Deck (46):
1

Roughly how long has Coronal Polishing existed?

1900's

2

Why might clients have difficulty accepting that we only polish select teeth and not every tooth?

Client's believe that polishing benefits the teeth, it only removes stain and some plaque.

3

Is there therapeutic value to coronal polishing?

NO!

4

What indicates need for stain removal?

When extrinsic stain not removed by OHC or SRP.
Prep for caries-preventive procedures.
Placement of pit/fissure sealants.
Professional application of fluoride agent.

5

What causes tooth stain?

Bacteria
Tobacco
Iron = supplements
Food
Beverages
Restorative biomaterials
Genetics
Medications
Fluoride

6

Definition of extrinsic

on outside of tooth

7

Definition of intrinsic

on inside of tooth

8

Definition of exogenous

out side source

9

Definition of endogenous

inside source

10

Precautions of coronal polishing

Aerosol/Spatter
Eye injury
Infection risk
Chemicals in paste

11

Coronal polishing technique:

Flare cup to adapt to proximals.
Polish gingival area of tooth first (flare slightly under gm to ensure complete biofilm removal)

12

Why do we rarely used finishing strips?

They have a tendency to open up the interproximal spaces and remove contact point.

13

If there is no stain on tooth but plaque removal only, what type of paste is used?

Tooth paste

14

If there is light stain on tooth, what type of paste is used?

Fine paste

15

If there is tobacco or tea/coffee stain on tooth, what type of paste is used?

Medium paste

16

If there is heavy stain particularly tobacco tar on tooth, what type of paste is used?

Coarse paste

17

What does the DH process of care begin with?

Assessment

18

What is subjective data?

collected through observation

19

What is objective data?

collected through oral or physical assessments

20

The mandate of periodontal assessment is to determine what three things?

1. The historical evidence of periodontal disease.
2. The extent of damage to the periodontium.
3. The current status of periodontal disease activity.

21

What is a dental hygiene diagnosis

Identifies the health behaviors of an individual patient as well as the actual or potential oral health problems that the dental hygienist are educated and licensed to treat.

22

Can DH diagnose?

Within the scope of their practice are able to make a preliminary diagnosis but a dentist must make a definitive diagnosis.

23

What is the DH care plan?

selection of interventions to be preformed by the patient.

24

With each problem, what must here be?

A goal to help correct the problem.

25

What does prognosis mean?

a look ahead to an anticipated outcome.

26

What does the diagnostic statement do?

Provides the basis for planning interventions.
Reflect expected outcomes.
Linked to observed/potential problems.

27

What is a diagnosis?

Identification of condition, problem or situation based on the analysis of its cause and defining characteristics.

28

A client has what 8 rights?

1. Protection from health risk.
2. Free from fear and stress.
3. Wholesome facial image.
4.Biologically sound and functional dentiton.
5. Skin and mucous membrane integrity of head and neck.
6. Freedom from head and neck pain.
7. Conceptualization and problem solving.
8. Responsibility for oral health.

29

What is a client-centered goal

Clients desired outcome achieved.

30

What is a cognitive goal?

Target increases in the clients knowledge and understanding.

31

What is a psychomotor goal?

focus on the clients skill development and skill mastery.

32

What is a affective goal?

pinpoint desired changes in clients values, beliefs and attitudes.

33

Each client-centered goal should have what?

subject, verb, criterion for measurement and a time dimension for evaluation.

34

Dental Hygiene Diagnosis
Client presents with....

slight/mod/severe localized/generalized periodontitis/gingivitis.

35

Why are probing depths not enough?

doesn't account for gingival over growth or recession.

36

What is a normal probing depth?

up to 3mm.

37

What's the deepest probing depth a dental hygienist can successfully clean?

6mm.

38

What does C.A.L mean?

Clinical attachment level

39

Focus of care is what ?

3D's - Diseases, disorders, disfunctions.

40

Types of calculus (6)

Spicules/spurs
Small scattered aggregations
Roughness
Ledges
Rings
Smooth burnished "speed bumps"

41

What causes smooth burnished "speed bumps"?

caused by dull or closed angulation with instrument.

42

What is calculus?

Mineralized plaque

43

How do you locate calculus?

Visually (supra) with air.
Visually (sub) sometimes with air down sulcus or see through thin gingival tissues. grayish tint.
Tactile
Auditory

44

How can we detect it?

Explorer
Periodontal probe
An exploratory stroke with any instrument (best with curet because hollow handle)

45

Root planing consists of:

Removal of surface irregularities post-scaling.
Removal of altered cementum.
Removal of residual calculus.

46

Scaling consists of:

Removal of calculus.
Reduce bacterial load.