04 Behavioral Assessment / 04.03 Gather Descriptive Data Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 04 Behavioral Assessment / 04.03 Gather Descriptive Data Deck (17):
1

Rating scales used for functional assessment are a type of
direct method.
analog assessment.
indirect method.
functional analysis.

indirect method.

The term "functional analysis" is usually reserved for experimental demonstrations. Indirect methods involve acquiring information without directly observing the behavior. Rating scales and interviews would be indirect methods. (Cooper, Heron, & Heward, 2007, pp. 50, 52-53; Iwata et al, 2000)

2

You are asked to use only empirical (experimental) methods of functional assessment. You would use
a functional analysis.
the Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS).
a rating scale.
(all of the others)

a functional analysis.

Indirect methods involve acquiring information without directly observing the behavior. Rating scales and interviews would be indirect methods. "Functional analysis" means employment of experimental methods and demonstration of a functional relation between behavior and experimental conditions. (Neef & Peterson, 2007, pp. 429-524; Iwata et al, 2000)

3

A parent asserts that he never gives in to escape-maintained tantrums. However, observation data indicate that he placates the child. This inaccuracy exemplifies a problem with
ABC descriptive data.
functional analysis.
behavioral interviews.
(all of the others)

behavioral interviews.

4

The methods used to determine what time of day a behavior is most likely to occur are
behavior rating scale, scatter plot, and functional analysis.
scatter plot, rating scale, and descriptive assessment.
scatter plot, ABC data, and behavioral interview.
behavioral interview, ABC data, and behavior rating scale.

scatter plot, ABC data, and behavioral interview.

This information is usually learned by asking (interview), recording data on a grid that reflects the time of the occurrences (scatter plot), or through ABC descriptive data. (Alberto & Troutman, 2003, pp. 244-254; Neef & Peterson, 2007, pp. 509-510)

5

Behavioral interview information is sometimes inaccurate because
inaccurate information is punished or accurate information is reinforced.
quantification is flawed.
inaccurate information is reinforced or accurate information is punished.
(all of the others)

inaccurate information is reinforced or accurate information is punished.
Being forthright about how certain behaviors are handled could reflect poorly on a care giver. Therefore, reports may be biased. At other times, information may be overlooked-e.g., when an inappropriate behavior is no long a problem because the care giver consistently reinforces precursor behaviors. Also, interviewees might not fully understand the question-e.g., a parent may say that they ignore behavior, but they unwittingly often attend to it. (Carr et al, 1999, pp. 19-20)

6

Behavioral interview information is sometimes inaccurate because
information is overlooked.
inaccurate information is reinforced or accurate information is punished.
interviewees do not fully understand the question.
(all of the others)

all others

7

You consult with an agency that wants you to use only indirect methods of functional assessment. You might use
the Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS).
a structured interview.
a rating scale.
(all of the others)

all other the others

8

Which question characterizes those found in a rating scale?
Does the rate of behavior change with the onset of the tangible condition?
Is the rate consistently higher in one experimental condition relative to the others?
Under which experimental condition does the behavior tend to occur?
Does the behavior occur in response to you talking to others in the room?

Does the behavior occur in response to you talking to others in the room?

Questions in a rating scale ask for opinions of behavior in the natural setting. There are no arranged conditions. (Alberto & Troutman, 2003, pp. 245-246; Cooper, Heron, & Heward, 2007, pp. 52-53; Neef & Peterson, 2007, pp. 510-511)

9

The methods used to determine what time of day a behavior is most likely to occur are
behavioral interview, behavior rating scale, and ABC data.
behavior rating scale, scatter plot, and functional analysis.
behavioral interview, scatter plot, and ABC data.
scatter plot, behavior rating scale, and descriptive assessment.

behavioral interview, scatter plot, and ABC data.

10

With which type of assessment method might you score never, almost never, seldom, half the time, usually, almost always, or always?
direct observation
analog assessment
rating scale
functional analysis

rating scale

11

One of the advantages of rating scales is that they
yield functional relations.
are simple and valid.
identify factors associated with specific topographies.
are simple and quantifiable.

are simple and quantifiable.
One of the advantages of rating scales is that they are simple to administer and quantifiable. However, their reliability is often in doubt and they do not yield a functional relation between assessment conditions and behavior. (Neef & Peterson, 2007, p. 510; Shores et al, 1999, pp. 220-222)

12

Examples of rating scales include
Questions about Behavioral Function (QABF).
Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS).
Functional Analysis Screening Tool (FAST).
(all of the others)

all others

13

Behavioral interviews are generally used to
obtain preliminary information.
obtain ABC data.
demonstrate a relation between a behavior and its controlling antecedent.
(all of the others)

obtain preliminary information.


Behavioral interviews are often used to glean information about the topography of the behavior (which enables development of an operational definition and subsequent data collection), times, activities, settings, and social factors that may influence behavior. It can also be used to determine potential reinforcers and communication skills. Of all the behavioral assessment methods, it is the only one well suited to identify setting events (e.g., medications, family issues) that could influence behavior. (Alberto & Troutman, 2003, pp. 244-245; Neef & Peterson, 2007, pp. 509-510)

14

Information on previous attempts to address the behavior would be gleaned from a
descriptive assessment.
functional analysis.
behavioral interview.
ABC descriptive data.

behavioral interview.
Short of a record review, this information would be obtained from a behavioral interview. (Alberto & Troutman, 2003, pp. 244-254; Neef & Peterson, 2007, p. 510).

15

You are asked to use indirect methods of functional assessment. You might use
the Motivation Assessment Interview (MAI).
a structured assessment.
a rating scale.
(all of the others)

rating scale.

16

One of the advantages of rating scales is that they
are simple and quantifiable.
identify factors associated with specific topographies.
yield functional relations.
are reliable and valid.

are simple and quantifiable.

17

"What does the behavior look like?" would be part of a
direct assessment.
rating scale.
behavioral interview.
functional analysis.

behavioral interview.
A description of the topography of the behavior is usually determined via interview (at least initially), although, refinement may result from direct observation. (Alberto & Troutman, 2003, pp. 244-245; Neef & Peterson, 2007, pp. 509-510)

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