1. Births, Deaths and Populations Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 1. Births, Deaths and Populations Deck (29)
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1

Define census.

The simultaneous recording of demographic data by the government at a particular time pertaining to all the persons who live in a particular territory.

2

What two key things does a census describe?

Households and people.

3

List five key features of a census.

Run by the government, covers a defined area, simultaneous throughout the defined area, universal coverage, happens at regular intervals (every 10 years in the UK).

4

What are three key bits of information that are gained from a census?

Population size, population structure, population characteristics.

5

What can the data from a census, regarding population size, be used to calculate?

Rates.

6

What can the data gained from a census about population structure highlight?

Service needs.

7

What are five measures of deprivation that can be measured in a census?

Unemployment, overcrowding, lone pensioners, single parents, lack of basic amenities.

8

What are three factors that affect population size and structure?

Births, deaths and migration.

9

Describe a birth notification. (Include details of who completes it, in what time frame and what services use it.)

The attendant at birth completes the birth notification, usually a nurse.
It is completed within 36 hours.
It is used for services such as immunisations.

10

Describe a birth registration. (Include details of who completes it, in what time frame and what services use it.)

The parents complete the birth registration.
It has to be completed within 42 days.
It is used for statistical purposes.

11

Define crude birth rate (CBR).

The number of live births per 1000 of the population.

12

Define general fertility rate (GFR).

The number of live births per 1000 females aged 15-44 years.

13

Define total (period) fertility rate (TPFR).

The average number of children that would be born to a hypothetical woman in her life.

14

What is fecundity?

The physical ability to reproduce.

15

What is fertility?

The realisation of the ability to reproduce as births.

16

List two factors that decrease fecundity.

Sterilisation and hysterectomies.

17

List two factors that increase fertility.

Sexual activity and economic climate.

18

List two factors that decrease fertility.

Contraception and abortions.

19

What does the CBR (crude birth rate) describe?

The impact of births on the size of a population.

20

What is the GFR (general fertility rate) used for?

Comparing the fertility of fertile female populations.

21

What is the TPFR (total period fertility rate) used for?

Comparing fertility of fertile females without being influenced by age group structures.

22

Describe a death certification. (Include details of who completes it and what it must include.)

The attending doctor completes the death certificate.
The likely cause of death must be included.

23

Describe a death registration. (Include details of who completes it and in what time frame.)

A qualified informant, such as a relative, must complete the death registration.
It must be completed within 5 days.

23

Define crude death rate (CBR).

The number of deaths per 1000 population.

24

Define age-specific death rate (ASDR).

The number of deaths per 1000 in an age group.

25

Define standardised mortality ratio (SMR).

A comparison of the observed number of deaths with the expected number of deaths if age-sex distribution of population were identical.

26

Why is mortality data collected? (List four reasons).

To classify the causes of death, analyse patterns in mortality rates, identify health problems and inform service needs.

27

What are population projections?

Estimates using additional assumptions about births, death and migrations about the future.

28

What are population estimations?

Estimates using what is known about births, deaths and migration about the present.