1. Eat Me - Patience Agbabi Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 1. Eat Me - Patience Agbabi Deck (10)
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1
Q

Summary

A

Woman is forcefed by her partner for his sexual satisfaction. She initially finds happiness in his investment for her, until stanza 7 which marks a change in tone as she comes to terms with the reality of her entrapment. Morbid ending - she sufforcates him to death.

2
Q

Structure

A
  • Brevity of verses: Presents series of vignettes
  • Rhyme: Heightens sense of entrapment
  • Language: Enacts movements + contours of body
  • Dramatic monologue
  • Tercets changing length: Breaking free
  • Regular structure: Routine
3
Q

‘they said ‘Eat Me’. And I ate. Did

What I was told. Didn’t even taste it.’

A
  • Alice in Wonderland: Infantilisation, trapped in a world controlled by outsider
  • Biblical register of syntax ‘and I ate’: Omnipotent power, ‘His’ 3rd person possessive pronoun
  • ‘Did what I was told’: Infantilises her, dominant parent/child relationship
  • Ambiguity of cake/sexual act: Power and submission imagery
  • Physical fullness/emotional emptiness
4
Q

‘He asked me to get up and walk round the bed so he could watch my broad belly wobble, hips judder like a juggernaut’

A
  • ‘So he could watch’: Personal satisfaction, objectifying, male gaze, voyeur
  • ‘Broad/belly’ and ‘judder/juggernaut’: Onomatopoeic, alliteration alludes to wobbling = jelly (Infantilisation)
  • ‘He’: Lack of identity, only ‘he’ and ‘I’, no one outside their morbid world vs. no togetherness
  • ‘Broad/juggernaut’: Half-rhyme - uncomfortable movement
5
Q

‘I was his Jacuzzi. But he was my cook, my only pleasure the rush of fast food, his pleasure, to watch me swell like forbidden fruit’

A
  • ‘Jacuzzi’: water being tamed for pleasure. Seems comfortable until he drowns in her flesh.
  • Caesura ‘but’: Justifies her vested interest, pause, mutualistic relationship
  • ‘Rush’: Addiction
  • ‘his pleasure’: Line below/non-caring
  • ‘Forbidden fruit’ Garden of Eden: Alludes to paradise yet dominion
6
Q

‘I was a tidal wave of flesh’

‘I allowed him’

A
  • Evident shift in power/ shift in subject
  • No longer centred on ‘he’ but ‘I’: Speaker now concedes to access her body
  • Control: Beginning to backfire, tidal wave prefigures speakers eventual actions
7
Q

‘And how/
could I not roll over on top. Rolled and he drowned
in my flesh. I drowned his dying sentence out’.

‘Nothing left in the house to eat’

A
  • ‘How could I not roll over on top’: Metaphor for fighting back vs. Erotic vs. Rage. Enjambment enacts process of rolling over.
  • Horror of murder undermined by morally compromising nature of relationship
  • Final stanza: Epilogue
  • Reveals poets sense of humour: Feeder gets the ultimate comeuppance
  • Reccurent water imagery: He is now a fish out of water, drowning, removes his ability to speak, seeking power
8
Q

Themes, Attitudes & Values

A
  • Intrapersonal/wider relationships
  • Post-colonial: Exoticism ‘forbidden fruit’ - speaker subverts to becoming a ‘tidal wave’ that engulfs and subsumes him.
  • Alliteation and assonace: Sensory description of body - tongue-in-cheek critique of Western consumerism.
9
Q

Comparison to ‘The Gun’

A
  • Life’s taboos: Death, Sex, Addiction, Excess

* Death & loss: Foreboding build up to death, control gained from death and loss, effect of death

10
Q

Comparison to ‘Giuseppe’

A

Ambiguous Relationships

  • Ambiguous sense of who the criminal is
  • Ambiguous response to death
  • Ambiguous involvement of speaker in relationship (Eat Me (Lovers? Relationship pre-existing - Giuseppe, sidelined, relationship marked by action.)