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1

Para 1 – Ovid throughout his poems seems to be rather concerned with the literary activity of elegy, rather than the actual content- that is, Corinna

- playful embracing of stereotypes of the elegist, as weak physically and emotionally;
- playful denigration of the epic and martial traditions;
- playful subversion of expected gender roles;
- playful and even dangerous subversion of Julian marriage laws;
- playful innuendo;
- playful subversion of his rhetorical skills;

2

- playful embracing of stereotypes of the elegist, as weak physically and emotionally;

plays on the stereotype of elegists as emaciated, joking that that lovesickness has left him emaciated, and so Cupid would not derive any joy from blunting his arrows on bone, and that he is capable to handle two girls and go again in the morning, despite his slenderness; ironically berates himself for his dubious morals, lamenting how difficult it is to be an incorrigible cad; deprecates himself as having neither the strength nor authority to control himself in regards to women, like a boat carried off on a current, as that there is no one certain type of beauty that elicits his desires – announces that there is no one certain type of beauty that elicits his desires- there a hundred reasons why he should be in love always

3

- playful denigration of the epic and martial traditions;

argues that even Hippolytus, sworn virgin, could be seduced by certain girls, turning him into Priapus; says that the complain of Philomela has run its course, and she should turn her lament to that of parrot; compares the relationship of parrot and turtle dove to Orestes and Pylades; compares the parrot to Hector and Protesilaus; humorously undercutting myth and inflating the death of parrot; calls him lucky to whom the battles of love lay waste, and asks the gods that he should be killed by love- ironic subversion of military wish to die in battle, saying that the soldier will instead be killed violently; begins with an epic sounding opening, describing the first ship, the Argo, on its quest for the Golden fleece, which it then bathetically undercuts by wishing that it had been sunk, so that no one else would ever sail; claims that Cupid is Mars’ stepson, and gets his fickleness from him, associating elegy and epic, to the dishonour of epic; denigrates military victory in comparison to his own; his is unshared- the sons of Atreus had to share their glory with an entire army; he alone plays every part, infantry, cavalry, standard bear; chance plays no role in his victory; (potentially humorously) that the Trojan war, the centauromachy and Aeneas’ war with the Latins were all motivated by a woman, undermining epic wars as being motivated by love and the centauromachy especially as also a drunken brawl; tells Macer that the theme of love is found even in the myth of the Trojan War, in Paris, Helen and Laodamia- even the most epic stories are contaminated by elegy and jocular ending note that he expects Macer will soon turn to elegy from epic

4

- playful subversion of expected gender roles;

subversion of expected power dynamic in Roman relationship- the wife and slave together work together to dupe the husband by creating false quarrels, and the wife always gets her way with her husband even if he disapproves; portrays himself as the more tentative and domestic in the relationship, urging Corinna not to go to on a sea-voyage; lists mythological examples of couples where the woman is superior; Calypso and Odysseus, Thetis and Peleus, Egeria and Numa the Just, Venus and Vulcan; says that he will be Corinna’s lover with whatever laws she decides, and that it is fitting for he to be a judge in the middle of the forum – mocking of Roman legality, picturing a woman as a judge, and subverting expected gender roles; says that he has often attempted to leave his girl, and yet never manages it, and that she can destroy him with kisses

5

- playful and even dangerous subversion of Julian marriage laws;

tells Bagoas to ignore what might be going on at the temple of Isis, a women’s only rite, so a good excuse for a woman to leave the house unaccompanied- ironic as she was supposed to be a chaste goddess, and she is being used as a cover for adultery and in the curved theatres- both good places for pick ups- subversive of Augustan laws, theatres were actually banned; ending note; apparently earnest request to be able to simply love freely, but peppered with sexual innuendo, and refers to his prayers as gentle- what were actually threats to tolerate adultery; emphasises at the beginning and end of 2.12 that his victory in love required no bloodshed, as opposed to that of a soldier, evoking Roman triumphs with chariots soaked in blood, making a dig at Augustus for promoting the military and punishing extramarital lovers

6

- playful innuendo;

recalls that he attempted epic poetry but stopped suddenly when his lover left him, making a playful innuendo above Jupiter; tells Bagoas to ignore what might be going on at the temple of Isis, a women’s only rite, so a good excuse for a woman to leave the house unaccompanied- ironic as she was supposed to be a chaste goddess, and she is being used as a cover for adultery and in the curved theatres- both good places for pick ups- subversive of Augustan laws, theatres were actually banned; ending note; apparently earnest request to be able to simply love freely, but peppered with sexual innuendo, and refers to his prayers as gentle- what were actually threats to tolerate adultery; if a girl criticises his poetry in comparison to that of Callimachus, he longs to grapple with her critical thigh- lack of seriousness; ironic self-assertion as capable to handle two girls and go again in the morning, though stereotypically skinny as an elegiac poet; sexual image- Ovid then wishes he could be the ring so that he could touch his girl’s breasts and fall into the folds of her tunic, or be wetted by her lips as she seals letters with it, joking then that he wouldn’t he would no longer find sealing a chore

7

- playful subversion of his rhetorical skills;

- playful subversion of his rhetorical skills; shows off his rhetoric in persuading Bagoas in 2.2; shows off his rhetoric in persuading Cupid in 2.9a; shows off rhetoric in attempting to persuade Corinna not to go on a sea-voyage in 2.11; all highlight his self-consciousness as a poet, both wanting to advertise his rhetorical education, and incorporate it into elegy

8

Para 2 – Within his poetry, Ovid seems to demonstrate heartfelt sentiment, despite any playful insincerity elsewhere in his elegy

- genuine attempts to persuade Bagoas in 2.2;
- some sincere empathy and pity for Corinna in her loss of her parrot;
- conveys his compulsion as a lover;
- displays real fear for Corinna in her sea voyage;
- shows some real contempt of militarism and advocation of loving;
- opening and closing of ring poem;
- sober ending note declaring his loyalty;

9

- genuine attempts to persuade Bagoas in 2.2;

threatens Bagoas with potential violence- even death; uses the tricolon of arguments thought to motivate a slave– inducing him with gains in honour, even shockingly suggested the mistress will be indebted to him, and pecuniary gains, and threatening him with the prospect of lashes and violence due to his hatred

10

- some sincere empathy and pity for Corinna in her loss of her parrot;

creates image of an Elysium for birds- possibly to comfort Corinna; ending note of the parrot’s tomb stone- possibly sincerely complimentary

11

- conveys his compulsion as a lover;

says that he is compelled to love even when he is exhausted by it, and is driven on by an unknown force in his mind, like a hard-mouthed horse or ship tugged by winds

12

- displays real fear for Corinna in her sea voyage;

conjures image of her ship going out to sea, with the sailor already worried about a storm, with a genuinely sinister image of death

13

- shows some real contempt of militarism and advocation of loving;

repetition and frankness of his point that lovers never kill anyone in 2.12 seems to suggest a genuine conviction and criticism of Ovid

14

- opening and closing of ring poem;

seemingly earnest opening, sending off the ring to his girl, and stating that it’s value is only in the love it betokens; undercuts the entire conceit as vain, and claims to be content with the ring simply as a symbol of his loyalty- Ovid as sincere, honest with the audience where he has been facetious

15

- sober ending note declaring his loyalty;

that Ovid will write verses for no one but her 17