53-54 Culture Flashcards Preview

Latin IX > 53-54 Culture > Flashcards

Flashcards in 53-54 Culture Deck (44):
1

Mundus Muliebris

Set of jewelry, perfumes, toiletries, and attire of a grown up woman

2

Tunica Alba

White tunic worn on wedding day by bride

3

Reticulum

Yellow hairnet worn by bride on wedding day

4

Flammeum

Bright orange veil worn by bride on wedding day

5

Pronuba

Married woman, attendant of bride on wedding day

6

Nuptiae

the wedding ceremony, which included a sacrifice, the signing of the marriage contract by 10 witnesses, the joining of the couples' right hands and the repitition of "Ubi tu es Gaius, ego Gaia."

7

"Ubi tu es Gaius, ego Gaia."

The formula where the bride was promising to be a faithful wife (when you are Gaius, I am Gaia), repeated by the bride after the ouple's right hands were joined, to which the guests replied "Good Luck" (feliciter) --> Gaius and Gaia were generic, typical Roman names.

8

Feliciter

"Good luck!"; something the guests at a wedding replied to the bride's statement of "Ubi tu es Gaius, ego Gaia."

9

Deductio

the procession of guests that escorted the bride and groom home; this took place after the bride groom pretended to carry off the bride, just as the Romans carried of the Sabine women.

10

Taedae

Torches carried by a procession of guests while escorting the couple home while singing songs to the god of marriage, Hymen.

11

Pompa

Funeral procession a very elaborate affair

12

Lucernae

Lamps that surrounded the body as it lay in the atrium of the house.

13

Candelae

Candles that surrounded the body which lay in the atrium before the procession through the city.

14

Neniae

Dirges sung during the funeral procession, which included teh singers of the dirges, torchbearers, professional mourners, family members and musicians

15

Lictorés

The public attendants that, in case of a magistrate or an ex-magistrate, carried the symbol of office (bundles of rods: fasces) during the procession.

16

Fascés

Bundles of rods that were carried by lictorés during the funeral procession; symbolized the office

17

Laudatio

a speech of praise or honor about the deceased that was given when the procession stopped in the Forum

18

Rogus

The funeral pyre upon which the body was placed, at the family tomb but outside of the walls. Some possessions of the deceased were put in it before a family member set it on fire. As the fire blazed, flowers and spices would be thrown into it as well.

19

Manés

Spirit of a dead man People mourned the deceased for 9 days after the last farewell after those 9 days, food was placed at the person's tomb as an offering or sacrifice to the deceased.

20

Dis Manibus

"For the dead man's spirit." A saying of respect that was engraved on tombstones

21

Sponsalia

the betrothal ceremony that was attended by relatives and friends, which often happened just before the actual wedding!

22

Annulus, i, m.

a ring, either gold or iron set in gold One of the gifts a bride was given on her wedding day, which she wore on her 3rd finger on her left hand, because it was believed that a nerve ran straight to the heart from that finger.

23

Set of jewelry, perfumes, toiletries, and attire of a grown up woman

Mundus Muliebris

24

White tunic worn on wedding day by bride

Tunica Alba

25

Yellow hairnet worn by bride on wedding day

Reticulum

26

Bright orange veil worn by bride on wedding day

Flammeum

27

Married woman, attendant of bride on wedding day

Pronuba

28

the wedding ceremony, which included a sacrifice, the signing of the marriage contract by 10 witnesses, the joining of the couples' right hands and the repitition of "Ubi tu es Gaius, ego Gaia."

Nuptiae

29

The formula where the bride was promising to be a faithful wife (when you are Gaius, I am Gaia), repeated by the bride after the ouple's right hands were joined, to which the guests replied "Good Luck" (feliciter) --> Gaius and Gaia were generic, typical Roman names.

"Ubi tu es Gaius, ego Gaia."

30

"Good luck!"; something the guests at a wedding replied to the bride's statement of "Ubi tu es Gaius, ego Gaia."

Feliciter

31

the procession of guests that escorted the bride and groom home; this took place after the bride groom pretended to carry off the bride, just as the Romans carried of the Sabine women.

Deductio

32

Torches carried by a procession of guests while escorting the couple home while singing songs to the god of marriage, Hymen.

Taedae

33

Funeral procession a very elaborate affair

Pompa

34

Lamps that surrounded the body as it lay in the atrium of the house.

Lucernae

35

Candles that surrounded the body which lay in the atrium before the procession through the city.

Candelae

36

Dirges sung during the funeral procession, which included teh singers of the dirges, torchbearers, professional mourners, family members and musicians

Neniae

37

The public attendants that, in case of a magistrate or an ex-magistrate, carried the symbol of office (bundles of rods: fasces) during the procession.

Lictorés

38

Bundles of rods that were carried by lictorés during the funeral procession; symbolized the office

Fascés

39

a speech of praise or honor about the deceased that was given when the procession stopped in the Forum

Laudatio

40

The funeral pyre upon which the body was placed, at the family tomb but outside of the walls. Some possessions of the deceased were put in it before a family member set it on fire. As the fire blazed, flowers and spices would be thrown into it as well.

Rogus

41

Spirit of a dead man People mourned the deceased for 9 days after the last farewell after those 9 days, food was placed at the person's tomb as an offering or sacrifice to the deceased.

Manés

42

"For the dead man's spirit." A saying of respect that was engraved on tombstones

Dis Manibus

43

the betrothal ceremony that was attended by relatives and friends, which often happened just before the actual wedding!

Sponsalia

44

a ring, either gold or iron set in gold One of the gifts a bride was given on her wedding day, which she wore on her 3rd finger on her left hand, because it was believed that a nerve ran straight to the heart from that finger.

Annulus, i, m.