7.1 Strategic Awareness Flashcards Preview

SGT CPK 2019 > 7.1 Strategic Awareness > Flashcards

Flashcards in 7.1 Strategic Awareness Deck (50)
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1
Q

The purpose of the New Zealand Police is for…?

A

Everyone to be safe and feel safe.

2
Q

What is our mission?

A

To be the safest country.

3
Q

What is our vision?

A

To have the trust and confidence of all.

4
Q

What is our moto?

A

Safer Communities Together.

5
Q

What are the Police goals?

A
  1. Prevent crime and victimisation;
  2. Target and catch offenders;
  3. Deliver a more responsive community focused Police service.
6
Q

What is key to achieving our goals?

A

Collaborate and work with our partner agencies to deliver outcomes to better New Zealand for our communities.

7
Q

What are the four strategies we use to achieve this model?

A

Prevention First

The Turning of the Tide

Safer Journeys

Wellness and Safety

8
Q

Explain Prevention First.

A

It puts all people – victims, offenders and staff at the centre of everything Police do through:

  • Deploying to beat demand,
- Targeting the drivers of
Police demand,
(i) Alcohol,
(ii) Youth Rangatahi,
(iii) Families/Whanau,
(iv) Roads,
(v) Organised crime and drugs,
(vi) Mental health,
(vii) Having the right mindset, and
(viii) Taking every opportunity to prevent harm.
9
Q

Explain the Turning of the Tide.

A

The Turning of the Tide, is a partnership between iwi and Police aimed at reducing Maori victimisation, offending, road fatalities and injuries.

It is about achieving better outcomes for Maori by working with iwi to create resilient communities and address the over representation of Maori in road policing and other statistics.

10
Q

Explain Safer Journeys.

A

The Road Policing Programme contributes to the Government’s Safer Journeys road safety strategy and the Police priorities of Protected Communities, Improved Road Safety and Less Crime.

The programme sets out actions to address risks including speed alcohol/drug impaired driving, restraint use, and distracted driving.

The vision is for “A safe road system increasingly free of death and serious injury”.

11
Q

Explain Wellness and Safety.

A

In order to keep our communities safe, we must first keep ourselves safe and well.

Our Wellness and Safety strategy demonstrates our clear focus on developing a strong culture that prioritises and supports all staff to look after one another, whether they are operational or office-based, volunteers or contractors, in New Zealand or offshore.

12
Q

What are our targets?

A

5, 10, 25, 90, 500

13
Q

What does the ‘5’ refer to?

A

A 5% reduction in road deaths each and every year.

It is a commitment to keep people safe on our roads.

14
Q

What does the ‘10’ refer to?

A

10,000 fewer serious crime victimisations by 2021.

It focuses us on reducing the crime that has the greatest impact on its victims.

It includes offences punishable by 2 years’ imprisonment or more (category 3 & 4). It excludes family violence, because we believe this crime type is significantly underreported and we want reporting to increase.

15
Q

What does the ‘25’ refer to?

A

25% reduction in Maori reoffending by 2025.

It recognises the priority we put on specific solutions to improve justice outcomes with and for Maori.

Not only is this vital to achieving our overall safety goals, it recognises that the justice system has not worked well for Maori in the past and we must be part of the solution.

16
Q

What does the ‘90’ refer to?

A

90% trust & confidence.

It recognises our mandate and ability to Police effectively depends on having the confidence of the community.

The way in which we police and interact with the public play a crucial role in how we are regarded by New Zealanders.

The 90% target for people feeling safe recognises that perceptions of safety (or lack of it) can have as big an impact on people as actually being unsafe. We want New Zealanders to both be safe and feel safe.

17
Q

What does the ‘500’ refer to?

A

$500 million of cash and assets restrained from gangs and criminals by 2021.

It is the target set as part of Government’s investment in 1800 additional Police.

Focusing on illicit funds is an effective way to target organised crime, and we intend to do more of it.

18
Q

With what three guides will we achieve our targets?

A

Our People

Our Partners

Our Transformation Programme

19
Q

How will ‘Our People’ help us achieve our targets?

A

It will help us ensure our people are:

  • Valued
  • Equipped and enabled
  • Safe and feel safe
  • High performing
  • Victim focused
  • Visible
20
Q

How will ‘Our Partnerships’ help us achieve our targets?

A

We will do this by establishing effective, action-oriented relationships at all levels with iwi and communities, other government agencies, NGOs and businesses.

21
Q

How will ‘Our Transformation Programme’ help us achieve our targets?

A

By embracing a range of initiatives to modernise and transform our business by:

  • Building the Front Line
  • Safer Whānau
  • Iwi and Community Partnerships
  • Evidence-Based Policing
  • Modernising our Service Delivery
  • Police High Performance Framework
22
Q

What is Prevention First designed to achieve?

A
  • prevent crime and victimization.
  • target and catch offenders.
  • deliver a more responsive Police service.
23
Q

Prevention first and our business, what is the aim?

A

Taking every opportunity to prevent harm.

24
Q

What are the core components of the Prevention First model?

A
  • Deploy to beat demand.
  • Target the drivers of demand.
  • Mindset: taking every opportunity to prevent harm.
25
Q

Describe ‘Deploy to beat demand.’

A

We are prepared and flexible, allowing us to mobilise resources preemptively and quickly get on top of demand.

26
Q

Describe ‘Evidence-based deployment.’

A

Evidence-based deployment means that we use tactics that have been proven to work, and we evaluate the results of our interventions to determine whether we achieved the desired outcome or need to refocus our efforts.

27
Q

What are our six drivers of crime?

A
  • Families – Whānau,
  • Youth – Rangatahi,
  • Alcohol,
  • Roads,
  • Organised crime and drugs,
  • Mental health.
28
Q

When thinking about our ‘Mindset’ what four points should guide us?

A
  • Responsibility to victims,
  • Repeat victimisation,
  • Offender management,
  • Locations.
29
Q

To deliver on Mindset what will we do?

A

Taking every opportunity to prevent harm, we will –

  • Demonstrate our organisational Values and Code of Conduct in every interaction,
  • Provide a proactive and consistent service to victims and offenders by always using the risk assessment process for dealing with offenders and victims.
  • Build relationships of trust to improve information sharing with partner agencies and communities that engage with victims and offenders.
  • Focus on victims’ needs in order to respond quickly and considerately to victims.
  • Create useful Victim Intervention Plans (VIPs) and increase the proportion of VIPs completed in each area.
  • Always use the agreed offender management approach.
  • Make sure every member of the team knows how their work contributes to our organisational goals, through the Police High Performance Framework.
30
Q

What does the Commissioner say in regards to mindset?

A

If everyone has this mindset, New Zealand Police will deliver on the intent of ‘Our Business’: making New Zealand the safest country in the world, where we can all ‘Be Safe and Feel Safe’.

31
Q

What does the PHPF do for us?

A

The Police High Performance Framework provides a unique toolbox to help us build the world’s best Police service.

32
Q

Why do we need the PHPF?

A

It will ensure everyone in our organisation has the tools and the ability to be the best they can possibly be – because that’s what’s expected of us.

33
Q

What are the five frame works and a bit about them?

A

F1, Strategy
- It provides a tool for leaders to connect their teams to Our Business – ensuring all our people are clear on the purpose of their role, and how they, and their team, contribute to NZ Police.

F2, Culture
- It shows us how a shift in ‘mindset’ will lead to a culture where leaders focus on purpose and enabling their people to make a difference. It provides a tool showing the qualities inherent in top performing teams, and how leaders can build a high performance culture in their teams and ultimately across Police.

F3, Leadership
- It will ensure leaders have a consistent understanding of the purpose and expectations of leadership in NZ Police, and are equipped with the tools to excel in their roles.

F4, Capability
- will equip individuals with tools to improve performance and help guide others to perform to their potential.

F5, Performance Management
- It will enable us to talk about performance in a way that is both meaningful and helpful.

34
Q

What is our vision for the Turning of the Tide?

A

All Māori will live full and prosperous lives, free from crime and road trauma.

35
Q

What are our values for the Turning of the Tide?

A
  • Aroha. We all make mistakes. We stand by people who accept responsibility for their mistakes and try to put things right. We do not turn our backs on them or judge them. But we don’t make excuses for them either.
  • Whakarīrā. Each generation strives to better themselves, for their own sakes and for the sake of their children.

· Manaakitanga. We are hospitable, fair and respectful; to ourselves and others.

36
Q

What is our mission for the Turning of the Tide?

A

To protect our wellbeing by preventing crime and injury and death on our roads.

37
Q

What are some key points in the Turning of the Tide that will help meet crime and crash reduction targets?

A

Mahi Tahi: Everyone working together to prevent crime and crashes.

Whanau Ora: Extended families preventing crime and crashes among themselves.

Körerorero: Talking crime and crash prevention in our homes and schools and on our marae.

38
Q

What are the sorts of social problems we are particularly concerned about in relation to the Turning of the Tide?

A
  • Reducing male absenteeism,
  • Improving child supervision,
  • Keeping kids in school,
  • Boosting parenting skills.
39
Q

What are our 6 core police values?

A

Professionalism
- Look the part, be the part. We take pride in representing Police and making a difference in the communities we serve.

Respect
- Treat others as they would want to be treated. We treat everyone with dignity, uphold their individual rights and honour their freedoms.

Integrity
- Actions say it all. We are honest and uphold excellent ethical standards.

Commitment to Mäori & the Treaty
- Stand together. We act in good faith of, and respect, the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi – partnership, protection and participation.

Empathy
- Walk in their shoes. We seek understanding of and consider the experience and perspective of those we serve.

Valuing diversity
- Many views, one purpose. We recognise the value different perspectives and experiences bring to making us better at what we do.

40
Q

What is the rule of law?

A

The rule of law is a fundamental characteristic of a democratic society.

It can be hard to explain as it means different things to different people. However one
definition is that it “defines the relationship of the government to its people: that people in a society should be governed by law and should be free from arbitrary government”

41
Q

What is a key concept of the rule of law?

A

Some key concepts included in the rule of law are that all people should be treated equally before the law and that individual liberties should be preserved. Many rule of law concepts are contained in the Bill of Rights Act 1990.

42
Q

Describe five aspects of New Zealand Policing that derive from the rule of law?

A
  1. We need to apply laws evenly i.e. people shouldn’t be treated differently because of, for example, their status in society, level of income, gender or ethnicity. Police officers who commit criminal offences must be held accountable.

2· We work in a criminal justice system that is free from corruption (defined as using public power for private gain).

3· We must not accept bribes, for example in exchange for not filing charges.

4· We protect the rights of offenders, for example, searches, arrests and interviews are conducted in a way that is consistent with the law.

5· We protect rights of victims, for example victims’ right to privacy is respected, as is their right to information and access to services.

43
Q

Why is the rule of law important for New Zealand Police?

A

Police are responsible for administering the law and therefore need to administer it in a manner that is consistent with the rule of law. This applies to both Constables and Police Employees.

44
Q

What are the principles outlined in Section 8 of the Policing Act 2008?

A

a) principled, effective, and efficient policing services are a cornerstone of a free and democratic society under the rule of law:
(b) effective policing relies on a wide measure of public support and confidence:
(c) policing services are provided under a national framework but also have a local community focus:
(d) policing services are provided in a manner that respects human rights:
(e) policing services are provided independently and impartially:
(f) in providing policing services every Police employee is required to act professionally, ethically, and with integrity.

45
Q

Section 9 of the Policing Act 2008 outlines the functions of the Police. What are they?

A

(a) keeping the peace:
(b) maintaining public safety:
(c) law enforcement:
(d) crime prevention:
(e) community support and reassurance
(f) national security:
(g) participation in policing activities outside New Zealand:
(h) emergency management

The Police discharge a wide range of functions, duties and responsibilities. Initially, the substance of a constable’s duties and responsibilities was largely developed through the common law. Many have now been codified in the Policing Act 2008 with only a small residue remaining in the common law. Other significant areas of policing, such as maintaining road safety and prosecuting offences, derive from broadly drawn statutory provisions. Additionally, a growing number of powers, duties and responsibilities can be attributed to provisions in other statutes.

46
Q

What does Section 20 of the Policing Act 2008 say about a Code of Conduct?

A

(1) The Commissioner must prescribe a code of conduct for Police employees, stating the standards of behaviour expected from Police employees.
(2) It is the duty of every Police employee to conduct himself or herself in accordance with the code of conduct.

47
Q

What three things does Section 30 of the Policing Act 2008 state, to guide us around command and control?

A

Every Police employee must obey and be guided by:

(a) general instructions; and
(b) the Commissioner’s circulars; and
(c) any applicable local orders.

48
Q

Under Section 30 of the Policing Act 2008, who should I be guided by?

A

Every Police employee must obey the lawful commands of a supervisor.

In the absence of a supervisor, the supervisor’s authority and responsibility
devolves on:

(a) the Police employee available who is next in level of position; and
(b) in the case of equality, the longest serving Police employee.

49
Q

What power does Section 63 of the Policing Act 2008 give the commissioner?

A

It allows the Commissioner to appoint an employee temporarily to any higher level of position in the case of a vacancy.

50
Q

When acting what must staff consider?

A

Staff must specifically consider whether they have proper authority to exercise a power and not assume that authority is automatically conferred.