If-, Rudyard Kipling Flashcards Preview

Mrs Latham IGCSE Revision Poetry > If-, Rudyard Kipling > Flashcards

Flashcards in If-, Rudyard Kipling Deck (14)
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1
Q

Meaning (3x bullet points)

A
  • Advice a father would give to his son
    • Growing maturity & shaping one’s identity
  • Everything epitomises Britishness
  • Stoicism (showing strength in face of hardship)
2
Q

Context

A
  • Written when British Empire at its peak
    • Victorian era: era of stoicism (endure pain/hardship without complaining)
    • “Stiff upper lip” = idiom
  • Inspired by Sir Jameson = doing his best to conquer : noble despite fact he failed
3
Q

Significance of title?

A

‘If-‘ - Enigmatic title

  • Conditional conjunction: Consequence/result = good or bad
    • Consequences of circumstances revealed on final line
      • = sense of drama & anticipation
  • Hyphen: Connects two ideas together
4
Q

Imagery #1

A
  • Personification: “Triumph” & “Disaster”
    • Opposites
    • Promote caution: be unfazed by both & you’ll be same
  • Described as “two impostors”
    • Success & failure = never what you think they are
      • Both hidden drawbacks = shouldn’t be too excited or disappointed
    • With these 2 words comes disruption / change but both temporary
5
Q

Imagery #2

A

“heart and nerve and sinew”

  • Rule of 3 + Polysyndeton
    • Emphasises all details necessary to make a man
    • Qualities man must have when others give up
      • i.e. imploring reader to endure
    • Force all aspects of being to keep going even when gone
  • Synecdoche (figure of speech - part of something represents the whole)
    • Poet saying “muscles” or “body,”
  • “heart”
    • Emotion
  • “nerve”
    • Bravery
  • “sinew”
    • Muscles & physical power
6
Q

Tone

A

Hortatory (urgers reader to follow certain path) + forceful (didactic)

  • Repetiton: “If”
    • ‘If-‘ begs question ‘is it possible’ =
    • Repetition forces reader to think whether or not they can live up to circumstances/conditions described
    • Sets a challenge we feel we should meet
  • Fact consequences (reward) of circumstances held back until end
    • Symbol of having reached manhood
    • Sense of drama & anticipation, reader wants follow this certain path
7
Q

Structure #1

A

Iambic Pentameter

  1. Closest written form to speech
    1. Pace of stability/familiarity
    2. Rooted in confidence
  2. 11 syllables & then 10 syllables (alternates) i.e. every odd line has additional syllable
    1. 1st line = obstacle (additional syllable)
    2. 2nd line = overcoming it (iambic pentameter)
    3. (Alternating rhyme scheme supports this)
8
Q

Structure #2

A

Structured as one long sentence = every line flowing into next

  • Creates perpetual ‘enjambment’
    • Sense of pace, urgency & dynamism
    • Makes poem feel important
    • Didactic = Kipling trying to educate son & reader (aspire to become British gentleman)
  • Implies spiritual and mental journey to manhood is long, complicated + challenging
9
Q

Name 5 possible comparisons

A
  • “Prayer Before Birth”
  • “Search for my Tongue”
  • “Poem at Thirty Nine”
  • “Piano”
  • “Do not go gentle into that good night”
10
Q

“Prayer Before Birth” Comparison

A
  • Both about cruel world
    • Kipling sees it as brave & admirable to face it
    • MacNeice suggests it’s better not encounter life at all
11
Q

“Search for my Tongue” Comparison

A

Both about what makes a person who they are.

12
Q

“Poem at Thirty Nine” Comparison

A

Both poems are about parent-child relationship

= been very influential

13
Q

“Piano” Comparison

A

Both about son’s relationship with parent

14
Q

Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night” Comparison

A

Advice to son gives to father = reverse of Kipling’s poem