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Flashcards in Boat Crew Seamanship Manual Deck (324):
1

Three basic boat crew positions on CG boats

Coxswain
Engineer
Crew member

2

Factors in determining crew size

Boat type
Operational need
Minimum crew size prescribed by higher authority

3

47' MLB minimum crew size

4, a coxswain, an engineer, and two crew members

4

___ sets the minimum crew sizes for standard boats

The Commandant

5

___ set minimum crew size for non-standard boats assigned tho their units

Area and district commanders

6

Qualifications as a ___ is a prerequisite to qualification as a boat engineer or a coxswain

Boat crew member

7

An auxiliarist may not serve which position aboard a CG boat?

Coxswain

8

Crew member responsibilities (8)

Helm
Lookout
Towing watches
Anchor watch
Rig towing and mooring lines
Act as the surface swimmer
Administer first aid
Operate DC equipment

9

Boat crew members must have this knowledge and performance skills

-Marlinspike seamanship and line handling
-Basic navigation and boat handling
-Survival, safety, and DC equipment
-Emergency and casualty control
-Watchstanding and comms
-First aid

10

AOR

Area of Responsibility

11

Boat engineers are responsible for ___

Propulsion and auxiliary machinery while underway

12

Engineers must have this knowledge and performance skills

-Complete knowledge of general engineering specifications and functional performance characteristics
-Performing pre-start, light off, and securing functions for propulsion machinery
-Monitoring, detecting , and responding to machinery and electrical system casualties or failues
-Operating auxiliary machinery and systems
-Using onboard DC equipment to minimize damage from fire, grounding, or collision

13

Coxswains are in charge of the ___

Boat and crew

14

Coxswains are responsible in order of priority for ___

-Safety and conduct of passengers and crew
-Safe operation and navigation of the boat
-Completion of the sortie or mission

15

Coxswains shall respond to ___

-Hazards to life or property
-Violations of laws or regulations
-Discrepancies in AtoN

16

Lookouts must report to the coxswain everything ___

Seen, smelled, or heard as well as everything they think the see, smell, or hear

17

During a search, post ___ lookouts when able

Two

18

When ___ are in the area or the boat is within __ of shore, lookout duties should be kept to a minimum to allow for early detection and decrease the likelihood of strikes

Whales
3 NM

19

Standing a proper lookout watch means ___

Using all available equipment to improve chance of early detection

20

Lookouts must report what they see, smell, or hear with as much ___

Detail as possible

21

In lookout, object ___ is immediately important

Type

22

Lookouts make reports using ___

Relative bearings only

23

Bearings are always reported in __ digits

Three

24

Objects in the sky are located by their ___

Relative bearing and position angle

25

Position angle can never be more than __

90 degrees

26

Report distances in __

Yards

27

Required information in a lookout report

Object name or description
Bearing
Position angle
Range

28

The lookout's method of eye search is called ___

Scanning

29

Scanning is a __ method of visually searching for objects

Step-by-step

30

Good scanning techniques will ensure that ____

Objects are not missed

31

Scanning also reduces ___

Eye fatigue

32

Two common scanning methods

Left to right and back again
Top to bottom and bottom to top

33

In scanning the eyes move in ___

Increments

34

Scanning creates ___ in the field of vision

Overlaps

35

When scanning, do not look directly at the __

Horizon

36

In severe fog, a second lookout should be stationed __

To cover the aft portion of the vessel

37

The eyes adjusting to the weak light and improving vision gradually is called ___

Dark adaptation

38

Before operating in dark conditions you should prepare for ___ prior

30 minutes

39

Lights must be ___ colored on boats for night vision

Red

40

The helmsman is responsible for ___

Safely steering the boat
Maintaining a course
Carrying out all helm commands given by the coxswain

41

The helmsman must maintain a given course within __ degrees

5

42

The primary duty of the towing watch is to ___

Keep the towline and the boat being towed under constant observation

43

The tow watch should report ___

Yawing
List
In step
Towed boat taking on water
Deck hardware failure
Towline about to part
Towed boat overtaking boat
Positioning of the towed boat's crew
Slack tow line in the water

44

A tow watch should be maintained until the disabled boat is ___

Moored or until relieved

45

The anchor watch must ensure that ___

Anchor line does not chafe and that the anchor does not drag, as well as watching for other vessels in the area

46

When at anchor the position of the boat shall be confirmed at least every ___

15 minutes

47

Two methods to determine in the anchor is dragging

Check tension in anchor line
Check the boat's position

48

Anchor compass bearing should be spread at least ___ apart

45 degrees

49

The swing circle radius is equal to __

The boat's length plus the length of the anchor line

50

___ and ___ fatigues are among the greatest dangers during rough weather operations

Mental
Physical

51

The hazards of fatigue dramatically reduces the powers of ___

Observation, concentration, and judgement

52

These may cause fatigue

Hot or cold weather
Eye strain
Maintaining balance
Stress
Noise
Sun
Lack of sleep
Boredom
Poor physical conditioning

53

The crew's safety and welfare are the ___ primary responsibility

Coxswain's

54

Primary symptoms of fatigue

Inability to focus or concentrate, narrowed attention span
Mental confusion or judgement error
Decreased coordination and sensory ability
Increased irritability
Decreased performance
Decreased concern for safety

55

Preventive measures for fatigue are ___

Adequate rest
Appropriate dress
Rotate crew duties
Provide food and refreshments
Observe other crewmembers for fatigue

56

Environmental conditions that promote fatigue

Motion sickness
Glare
Wind and rough seas
Rain or snow
Vibration

57

Sea sickness is caused by __

An imbalance between visual images and the portion of the middle ear that senses motion

58

Ways to avoid sea sickness

Medication
Stay out of confined spaces
Stay in fresh air
Look at the horizon
Avoid smoking

59

Antimotion sickness medications may not be given __

Without medical supervision
Within 12 hours of alcohol consumption
To pregnant crewmembers

60

Colorless, odorless, lethal gas, also most common lethal gas encountered during boat operations

CO

61

Symptoms of lethal fume poisoning

Throbbing temples
Dizziness
Ears ringing
Watering and itching eyes
Headache
Cherry-pink skin color

62

The first senses affected by poisonous gases are those that control a person's ___

Judgement and decision-making ability

63

If CO or any other type of poisoning is suspected ___

Remove the victim to fresh air and get medical help immediately

64

If the victim is unconscious, do not try to ___

Assist them alone

65

Any continual noise at the same pitch can ___

Distract, lull, or aggravate to the point where it adversely affects temperament and the ability to perform properly

66

Use single hearing protection whenever noise levels exceed ___

85 dB

67

Use double hearing protection for noise levels over ___

104 dB

68

Ear protection is required when working in, or making rounds in, an ___

Enclosed engineering space

69

Time required to metabolize alcohol for two drinks ____
Three or more ___

8 hours
12 hours

70

Excessive loss of body heat may lead to ___

Hypothermia

71

The loss of internal body temperature

Hypothermia

72

Normal body temperature is ___

98.6 degrees F

73

Never give hypothermia victims anything by ___, especially ___

Mouth
Alcohol

74

Signs of hypothermia

Pale
Cold skin
Dilated pupils
Poor coordination
Slurred speech
Incoherent thinking
Unconsciousness
Muscle rigidity
Weak pulse
Slow and labored breathing
Irregular heart beat

75

Who may waive the requirement to wear hypothermia protective clothing on a case-by-case basis?

CO or OIC

76

The development of ice crystals within body tissues

Frostbite

77

Frostbite is most likely to develop in air temperatures less than ___

20 degrees F

78

Factors that contribute to frostbite

Cold stressors
Restriction of blood-flow
Lack of appropriate protection
Skin exposure

79

A frostbite victim will complain of ___ in the affected area

Painful cold and numbness

80

What will develop with frostbite?

Waxy white or yellow-white, hard, cold, and insensitive areas

81

As the frostbite area begins to thaw, it will be ___

Extremely painful and swelling or blisters may appear

82

A patient being treated for frostbite should also be treated for ___

Hypothermia

83

___ is an essential factor to maintaining body temperature

Staying dry

84

Clothing worn next to the skin must ___

Carry or wick moisture away from the body

85

The first layer of clothing is the ___

Wicking layer

86

The second layer of clothing is the ___

Insulating layer

87

The third layer of clothing is the ___

Moisture barrier

88

The insulating effect of a fabric is related to ___

How much air it can trap

89

The outer layer should stop ___

Wind and water

90

Most heat loss occurs through the ___

Extremities, especially the head

91

Effects of the sun

Sunburn
Dehydration
Heat rash
Heat cramps
Heat exhaustion
Heat stroke

92

Appears as redness, swelling, or blistering of the skin

Sunburn

93

Other effects of overexposure to sun are ___

Fever, gastrointestinal symptoms, malaise, and pigment changes in the skin

94

Medical/scientific term for salts, specifically ions

Electrolyte

95

The body uses these to maintain voltage across cell membranes and to carry electrical impulses for moving the muscles

Electrolytes

96

The body loses electrolytes mostly through ___

Perspiration

97

When water and electrolytes are not replaced, the body experiences ___

Dehydration

98

Drinking ___ increases dehydration

Alcohol and caffeine

99

When the body loses __ of body weight in fluids the individual begins to feel nauseated

5%

100

When __ of body fluids are lost, symptoms increase in this order:
Dry mouth
Dizziness
Headache
Difficulty breathing
Tingling in arms and legs
Bluish skin
Indistinct speech
Inability to walk
Cramping legs and stomach

6 - 10%

101

Prevalent among those living and working in warm, humid climates or in hot spaces ashore or aboard boats, or in cool weather if a person overdresses

Heat rash

102

Heat rash is also called ___

Prickly heat

103

Heat rash is caused by ___

Breakdown of a body's ability to perspire
Decreased evaporative cooling of the skin

104

Heat rash interferes with ___

Sleep

105

Symptoms of heat rash

Pink or red minute lesions
Skin irritation
Frequent, severe itching

106

If heat rash occurs ___

Remove to cool space, cool, wet towels should be applied to affected areas

107

Painful contractions caused by excessive salt and water depletion

Heat cramps

108

__ muscles are prone to heat cramps

Recently stressed

109

Symptoms of heat cramps

Legs drawn into fetal position and excessive sweating will occur. May grimace or cry out in pain

110

Treating heat cramps

Place in cool place, lie down, offer cool drinks, excessive ingestion of salt not allowed. Treat cramped muscles with heat packs or massage

111

Occurs when people exercise heavily or work in a warm, humid environment where boy fluids are lost through heavy sweating

Heat exhaustion

112

Sweat does not evaporate as it should, possibly because of high humidity or too many layers of clothing

Heat exhaustion

113

Symptoms of heat exhaustion

Person collapses and sweats profusely. Pale skin, pounding heart, nausea, headache, restlessness

114

Major medical emergency that results from the complete breakdown of the body's sweating and heat regulatory mechanisms

Heat stroke

115

Heat stroke is also called ___

Sun stroke

116

Heat stroke is caused by ___

Operating in bright sun or working in a hot environment

117

Symptoms of heat stroke

Red skin, hot and dry to touch
Body temp above 105 degrees F
Weak rapid pulse
Confusion, violence, delirium, unconsciousness, lack of coordination
Brain damage

118

Most serious of all heat disorders and is an immediate threat to life

Heat stroke

119

The result of overloaded heat balance mechanisms that are still functioning

Heat exhaustion

120

___ strikes the victim when the thermo-regulatory mechanisms are not functioning, and the main avenue of heat loss, evaporation of sweat is blocked

Heat stroke

121

Two preventive measure of heat illnesses

Water
Salt

122

Under conditions of profuse sweating, each person will require ___ or more of fluid intake per hour

One pint (.5 litres)

123

Water should be taken in ___

Small quantities at frequent intervals

124

The average diet provides ___ of salt daily

15 - 20 grams

125

Collection of people that uses the technical abilities of its members to achieve a common mission

Team

126

Team coordination skills (7)

Leadership
Mission analysis
Adaptability and flexibility
Situation awareness
Decision-making
Communication
Assertiveness

127

Commands and external communication should be done using ___

Standard terminology

128

Ensure that all information given ___

Is acknowledged by the receiver

129

Four rules of risk management

-Integrate risk management into mission planning and execution
-Accept no unnecessary risks
-Make risk decisions at the appropriate level
-Accept risks if benefits outweigh costs

130

Risk management is a ___ process

Repetitive and continuous process

131

Risk management is most effective when it is ___

Proactive

132

Understanding risk is highly dependent upon ___

Technical knowledge and expertise

133

Seven steps of risk management

-Define mission objectives and tasks
-Identify possible hazards to the boat and crew
-Risk is a function of severity, probability and exposure
-Unnecessary risk has to be eliminated
-Did the mission coordinator validate the risk assumed by the coxswain is worth the mission objective?
-This decision implements the best option given the risks and gains, the crew is aware of the expected outcome
-Did the action achieve the desired outcome? Are the risks changing?

134

Anything that could go wrong with the equipment, the environment, or the team

Hazards

135

Risk categories

Planning
Event complexity
Asset selection
Communications and supervision
Environmental conditions

136

Function of severity, probability, and exposure

Risk

137

Describes the potential loss

Severity

138

The likelihood that the consequences will happen

Probability

139

The amount of time people or equipment will be exposed to the hazard

Exposure

140

Levels of risk

High
Medium
Low

141

Risks cannot be managed with constant control

High risk

142

Risks are manageable with constant control

Medium risk

143

Risks are manageable with control as required

Low risk

144

Unnecessary risk has to be __

Eliminated

145

Risks can be lowered by examining ___

-Changes to the planned optempo
-Command and control
-Mission tasks
-Timing of tasks
-Boat requirements or crew qualifications
-Number of assigned boats and/or crew
-Required equipment and/or protective equipment

146

___ are required before the boat gets underway

Informal crew briefings

147

Help create a shared mental picture of what is expected to happen and strives to set rules for the mission

Briefings for the coxswain and crew

148

The best opportunity to evaluate performance and recognize individual and team accomplishment

Debriefing

149

The wearing of jewelry, including rings, wristwatches, necklaces or other items not consisting of organizational clothing, PPE, or other uniform articles by boat crew members engaged in ____ is prohibited

Hoisting, towing, or other deck evolutions where the potential for snagging exists

150

The informal crew briefing shall be comprised of these topics

Mission objective
Duties and responsibilities
Positive climate for teamwork
Improvement goals

151

The informal crew debriefing shall cover these topics

Major events
Level of performance
Outcome of events
Evaluation of goals
Establishment of goals

152

The CG authorizes crewmembers to render first aid, consistent with their training in their role as emergency assistants regardless of their ___

First aid qualifications

153

Crewmembers providing first aid must do the following

-Evaluate the scene
-Consider whether or not the rescuers are trained and equipped to safely render assistance
-Protect themselves from injury or infection
-Keep calm
-Act quickly
-Call station or sector as appropriate to activate EMS if necessary

154

When responding to an injury, if the scene is unsafe, it should not be entered until ___

The crew is fully prepared and protected against hazards such a exposed live electrical wires, toxic vapors, fire, blood, or body fluids

155

This information is important in the initial assessment of injuries

-Number of patients
-General condition of patients
-Mechanism of injury
-Patients level of consciousness
-Causes or symptoms of shock

156

Those cases that need attention from a medical professional or the crew decides it is beyond their capability

Serious injury cases

157

Human blood may contain ___

Bloodborne pathogens

158

It is the responsibility of the ____ to safely transport the victim as rapidly as possible, while preventing further injury, shock, or unnecessary pain

The coxswain and crew

159

Important rules to remember when transporting an injured person

-Notify station to activate appropriate medical resources
-Avoid moving the patient until that person is examined and all injuries protected
-Immobilize head and neck if injury is suspected prior to movement
-Seek assistance in moving the patient
-Always explain the move procedure in advance to conscious patients
-Movements should be careful, deliberate, and the minimum required
-Almost all patients are transported lying down

160

This may accompany injury and can reduce a victim's ability to deal with and survive serious injuries

Shock

161

Depressed physiological or mental state

Shock

162

Events that can cause shock

Trauma
Allergic reactions
Hypothermia
Drugs
Toxins
Heart attack
Illnesses
Emotional

163

Symptoms of shock

Restlessness
Fainting
Thirst
Nausea
Weakness
Anxiousness
Fright
Dizziness

164

Signs of shock

Weak rapid pulse
Shallow rapid irregular breathing
Cold clammy skin
Dilated pupils
Level of consciousness may be decieving

165

Strong signs of shock

Skin color
Eyes
Pulse
Respiration
Consciousness

166

Initial treatment of shock

Limit patient's activity, ideally lying down. Kept warm, if not already overheated. If there is not head injury or breathing trouble, place them on their back and elevate the legs about 8 to 10 inches

167

Do not allow a shock victim to ___

Eat or drink

168

Rapid, extreme allergic reaction

Anaphylactic shock

169

Symptoms of anaphylactic shock

-Itching skin, hives
-Swelling of lips, tongue, feet, throat, and hands
-Wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing
-Nausea and vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea
-Headache
-Altered mental status
-Loss of consciousnes

170

Severe, sometimes life-threatening, allergic reaction that can occur within minutes of exposure to an offending substance

Anaphylactic shock

171

Treatment of anaphylactic shock

Requires medication such as epinephrine

172

Death can occur within ___ after respiratory failure

4 - 6 minutes

173

Events that may cause people to stop breathing include ___

Near drowning
Suffocation
Electrocution
Poison gas
Heart attack
Drug overdose
Choking

174

General term that covers all measures taken to restore life of consciousness to an individual

Resuscitation

175

Measures taken to restore life include ___

Artificial respiration
Cardiac compression
CPR

176

Method used to restore normal blood-flow to the brain

Cardiac compression

177

Uses both artificial respirations and chest compressions to revive a victim in respiratory and cardiac arrest

CPR

178

Symptoms of heart attack

-Severe, crushing type of pain under the breastbone, arms, neck, and jaw
-Profuse sweating
-Shortness of breath
-Extreme anxiety
-Nausea and vomiting
-Bluish discoloration of lips, fingernails, and skin

179

Treatment for a heart attack

-Keep victim quiet and at rest
-Administer oxygen
-Place the victim in the position of most comfort
-Seek immediate medical assistance
-Determine if victim is taking any medications
-Reassure the patient that assistance is on the way
-Transport as quickly and safely as possible

180

Any bleeding or clotting affecting the blood vessels of the brain

Stroke

181

Symptoms of a major stroke

Unconsciousness
Shock
Confusion
Dizziness
Numbness/weakness on one side of body
Seizures
Impaired vision

182

Symptoms of a minor stroke

Headache
Facial droop
Difficulty speaking, or limited usage of a limb

183

Treatment of stroke

-Activate EMS
-Obtain medical assistance immediately
-Treat as for shock
-Assist with breathing if necessary

184

CG level of assistance in scuba accidents

Arranging or providing transportation for victims and advising interested parties of the location for the nearest recompression facility

185

While transporting scuba victims, treatment should be ___

Same as shock, but do not elevate the legs

186

Two special problems usually seen in scuba diving accidents

Air emboli
The bends

187

Air bubbles in a diver's blood

Air emboli

188

Air emboli is most often found in divers who ___

Hold their breath during ascent

189

Decompression sickness

The bends

190

Result of coming up too quickly from a deep, prolonged dive

The bends

191

Symptoms and signs of decompression sickness

Deep pain to the muscles and joints
Choking
Coughing
Labored breathing
Chest pains
Blotches on the skin

192

Rapid ascent defeats the body's ability to filter escaping gases through the lungs resulting in ___

Nitrogen gas bubbles in the blood stream

193

The onset of the bends can take from ___

1 to 48 hours to appear

194

Divers increase the risk of decompression sickness if they fly within __ after a dive

12 hours

195

For scuba victims, place them on their ___ side with head down

Left

196

Medical information needed to arrange correct response for a scuba incident

Depth of diving activities
Number of dives that day
Overall medical condition
First occurrence of symptoms
Problems during dive

197

Strip of woven material that holds a wound, dressing, or splint in place, helping to immobilize, support, and protect an injured part of the body

Bandage

198

Used for injuries to the chest or abdomen

Binder

199

Useful as a bandage for almost any part of the body

Gauze bandages

200

Useful for small wounds that are clean

Band-Aids

201

Useful as an emergency cover for an entire scalp, hand, foot, or other large area

Triangular bandages

202

Two general principles for bandage application

-Should be snug, but not so tight as to interfere with circulation either at the time or later if swelling occurs
-A bandage is useless if tied too loose

203

Escape of blood from arteries, veins, or even capillaries because of a break in their walls

Hemorrhage

204

Types of bleeding

Arterial
Venous
Capillary

205

Characterized by blood that is bright red and gushes forth in jets or spurts that are synchronized with the victim's pulse

Arterial bleeding

206

Characterized by blood that is dark red, and comes in a steady flow

Venous bleeding

207

Characterized by blood that is bright red, and oozes from the wound

Capillary bleeding

208

There are ___ of blood in the human body

10 pints

209

The best method to control hemorrhaging is by ___

Applying direct pressure to the wound

210

To reduce the flow of bleeding, the wound should be raised so that it is at a level higher than the ____

Heart

211

If bleeding persists after applying direct pressure or if there is severe arterial bleeding, ___

Digital pressure can be applied at pressure points

212

Areas in the body where a major artery flows over a bony prominence

Pressure point

213

Always be extremely careful when applying direct pressure as it may ___

Cause damage to the limb due to inadequate blood flow

214

Place a tourniquet __ above the wound

2 - 3 inches

215

Broken or cracked bone

Fracture

216

The bone has broke and an open wound is present

Compound (open) fracture

217

No open wound is present, but the bone may be broken or cracked

Simple (closed) fracture

218

Indications of a fracture

Pain, swelling, discoloration at injury site
Misalignment and/or disability of injured part
Victim's indication

219

Treatment of fracture

Immobilize with splint, don't attempt to straighten

220

Treatment of spinal injuries

Maintain alignment and immobilize the spine, do not splint

221

Indication that a patient's rib may have punctured a lung

Coughing up frothy bright red blood

222

Causes of burns

Thermal
Chemical
Sunburn
Electric shock
Radiation

223

In general the ___ of the burn is more important than the __ of the burn

Size
Degree

224

Burns are classified by ___

Depth or degree of skin damage

225

General classifications of burns

First-degree
Second-degree
Third-degree

226

Mildest form of burn

First-degree

227

These burns involve only the outer layer of skin

First-degree

228

Signs of first-degree burn

Redness, increased warmth, tenderness, and mild pain

229

___ burns extend through the outer layers of the skin

Second-degree

230

These burns involve the inner layers of the skin, but not enough to prevent rapid regeneration

Second-degree

231

Signs of second-degree burns

Blisters, severe pain, redness, and warmth

232

___ burns are those that penetrate the full thickness of the skin, destroying both the outer and inner layers

Third-degree

233

Symptoms of third-degree burns

Severe pain may be absent, white lifeless color to black (charred)

234

Burns of the respiratory tract may be diagnosed by __

Singed eyelashes, hoarseness, sore throat, or coughing of blood

235

In determining what percentage of a victim's body surface area has suffered some type of damage, these estimates should be used:
Chest __
Back __
Arm __
Leg __
Head __
Genitals __

8%
8%
9%
18%
9%
1%

236

Use only __ for flushing the eyes

Fresh tap water

237

PFD

Personal Flotation Device

238

General name for the various devices designed to keep a person afloat in water

PFD

239

How many types of PFD?

5

240

Type I PFD

Offshore life jacket

241

One-piece, reversible PFD intended primarily for use by survivors, passengers on towed vessels, or prisoners aboard vessels

Type I

242

Only wearable flotation device required to be reversible

Type I

243

___ PFD is effective in all waters, especially open, rough, or remote waters where rescue may be delayed

Type I

244

Type I PFD is designed to ___

Turn most unconscious wearers in the water from face-down to vertical or slightly backward

245

Type II PFD

Near-shore buoyant vest

246

Wearable device that will turn some unconscious wearers to a face-up position in the water

Type II PFD

247

Type III PFD

Flotation aid

248

Routinely worn aboard boats when freedom of movement is required and the risk of falling over the side is minimal

Type III PFD

249

Type III PFD buoyancy

15.5 lbs

250

Type IV PFD

CG approved device to be thrown to a PIW and is grasped by the user until rescued

251

Type V PFD

Special-use devices

252

All PFDs in service shall be outfitted with two accessories

-Whistle
-Distress signal light

253

PML

Personnel Marker Light

254

The PML is what color?

Yellow-green

255

The PML is visible for a distance of approximately ___ on a clear night, and lasts as long as ____

One mile
8 hours

256

In temperatures below ___ the PML will last longer, but have a lesser brilliance

50 degrees F

257

Four primary types of hypothermia protective clothing used in the CG

Anti-exposure coverall
Dry suit
Wet suit
Immersion suit

258

Water temp at which anti-exposure suit is necessary

60 degrees F

259

Air and water temp at which dry suit is necessary

Both at 50 degrees F

260

Also known as a survival suit

Immersion suit

261

Worn when abandoning ship

Immersion suit

262

Worn over all PFDs except inflatables

Boat crew survival vest

263

Contents of boat crew survival vest

-Emergency signaling mirror
-Signal whistle
-Marine smoke and illumination signal
-Distress signal light
-Survival knife
-Personal Locator Beacon

264

Pocket-sized mirror with a sighting hole in the center and a lanyard attached

Emergency signaling mirror

265

Used to attract the attention of passing aircraft, boats, or ground rescue teams by reflecting light at them

Emergency signaling mirror

266

Range of the emergency signaling mirror

Great distances

267

Instructions for using the mirror are ___

Printed on the backside

268

Small, hand-held device that produces a loud sound when it is blown

Signal whistle

269

Standard whistle construction

Plastic with no cork ball

270

Signal whistle's audible distance

1000 metres/1100 yards

271

MK-124 MOD 0

Smoke and Illumination Signal

272

Pyrotechnic smoke and illumination signal used day or night as a distress signal at sea or on land

MK-124 MOD 0

273

One end of the MK-124 produces ___ as the day signal and the other end produces ___ as the night signal

Orange smoke
A red flare

274

Weight of MK-124

8 oz

275

The ends of the MK-124 burns for about ___

20 seconds

276

The night end of the MK-124 has ___

Two raised bands around its circumference

277

Hold the MK-124 ___

Downwind and overhead at a 45 degree angle

278

If the MK-124 smoke signal end flames up ___

Briefly immerse it in water or hold it against a solid object

279

MK-79 MOD 0

Illumination Signal Kit

280

Pyrotechnic illumination signal kit that contains seven screw-in cartridge flares and one pencil-type projector

MK-79 MOD 0

281

The MK-79 contains ___ flares

7

282

MK-79 produce ___

A red star display at an altitude of 250-650 feet for a minimum time of 4.5 seconds. Luminous intensity of 12000 candle power

283

Altitude of MK-79

250-650 feet

284

Burn time of MK-79

4.5 seconds

285

Luminous intensity of MK-79

12000 candle power

286

If the MK-79 fails to fire after two attempts, wait ___ before unscrewing

30 seconds

287

Lightweight, compact, battery-operated strobe light that emits a high intensity visual distress signal

Distress signal light

288

One side of the distress signal light is equipped with ___

Hook tape

289

The distress signal light emits ___

50 flashes per minute, with a luminous intensity of 100000 candle power

290

The distress signal light will flash for ___ when operated continuously or ___ when operated intermittently

9 hours
18 hours

291

On a clear night the distress signal light will have a minimum visual range of ___

5 miles

292

Basic tool to free the crew member from entangling lines

Survival knife

293

Thee survival knife should be of ___ design

Fixed blade made of corrosion-resistant material

294

The primary distress signal

PLB

295

PLB broadcasts on ___

406 MHz and 121.5 MHz

296

406 MHz can provide a position accurate to within ___ within ___

Three NM
90 minutes

297

121.5 MHz can provide a signal to ___

Help to home in on the individual in distress once on scene

298

MK-127A1

Parachute Illumination Signal

299

MK-127A1 produces ___

Parachute-suspended white star flare

300

MK-127 burn time

36 seconds

301

MK-127 altitude

650-700 feet

302

When does the MK-127 ignite?

After climbing to altitude

303

Luminous intensity of MK-127

125000 candle power

304

MK-127 descent rate

10 - 15 feet per second

305

What part of the MK-127 should be facing up?

The red band

306

The MK-127 should be facing ____ when fired

90 degrees

307

If a MK-127 misfires it cannot be approached for at least ___

30 minutes

308

The six person raft is usually carried on CG boats greater than ___

30'

309

Length of life raft painter line

50'

310

Painter line weak link requires ___ to break

500 lbs of force

311

Drop the raft on the ___ side of the boat

Leeward

312

Line used on CG boats is classified in two different ways

Material used
Size

313

Lines are categorized as ___

Natural fiber or synthetic fiber

314

Line is measured by ___

Circumference

315

Small stuff

Up to 1.5" in circumference

316

Line

1.5" to 5" in circumference

317

Hawser

Everything over 5" in circumference

318

Lay of the line

Strands are twisted either to the right or the left

319

The point where the static pulling force becomes such that any increase in engine load could lead to damage to the engine or the towing bitt

Bollard pull

320

Used to tie a line back upon itself

Knot

321

Used to secure two lines together

Bend

322

Used to tie a line to a ring, rail or spar

Hitch

323

Main body of the boat

Hull

324

Three basic hull types

Displacement
Planing
Semi-displacement