Business Architecture Practice and Governance Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Business Architecture Practice and Governance Deck (164):
1

Is the goal to leverage business architecture to facilitate strategic planning, address executive priorities, deliver customer value, leverage investments in major initiatives, and deploy horizontal solutions across business units?

Determine Business Architecture Objectives (Fundamental Question)

2

Is the goal to use business architecture as away to address tactical business requirements?

Determine Business Architecture Objectives (Fundamental Question)

3

Addressing merger, acquisition, divestiture, or similar organizational streamlining or consolidation

Determine Business Architecture Objectives (strategies, issues, and challenges)

4

Managing holistic views of product and service delivery across business partners

Determine Business Architecture Objectives (strategies, issues, and challenges)

5

Streamlining policy management across disparate or partially autonomous division

Determine Business Architecture Objectives (strategies, issues, and challenges)

6

Comparing and evaluating core capabilities against competitors

Determine Business Architecture Objectives (strategies, issues, and challenges)

7

Creating a common, highly transparent view of customers and other stakeholders

Determine Business Architecture Objectives (strategies, issues, and challenges)

8

Increasing the consistency and integrity of operational and executive information

Determine Business Architecture Objectives (strategies, issues, and challenges)

9

Determining the impact of regulatory or related compliance across business units

Determine Business Architecture Objectives (strategies, issues, and challenges)

10

Recognizing, harvesting, and delivering improved innovation to customer

Determine Business Architecture Objectives (strategies, issues, and challenges)

11

Executive issues not getting addressed due to inability to communicate requirements to solution teams

Communicate Business Value (salient issues)

12

Stakeholder/customer issues related to misalignment of concepts or terminology

Communicate Business Value (salient issues)

13

Multiple business units delivering conflicting information

Communicate Business Value (salient issues)

14

Inability to synchronize information due to conflicting vocabulary

Communicate Business Value (salient issues)

15

Issues related to multiple teams working at cross-purposes and delivering poorly synchronized results

Communicate Business Value (salient issues)

16

Failures related to miscommunication or inarticulate requirements

Communicate Business Value (salient issues)

17

Cost of developing business requirements that are not delivering results

Communicate Business Value (salient issues)

18

Issues related to executive reporting or synchronization of financial information

Communicate Business Value (salient issues)

19

Focus on high payback areas where costs or uncontrolled growth are spiraling

Communicate Business Value (Executive focus area)

20

Identify one or more customer related opportunities that are high on the priority list

Communicate Business Value (Executive focus area)

21

Review governance issues impacting how well the organization performs

Communicate Business Value (Executive focus area)

22

Empower teams to seek cross-disciplinary solutions where required to address issues

Communicate Business Value (Executive focus area)

23

Investment and initiative planning that leverages value streams and capabilities as a way to clarify scope and focus

Assess Opportunities to Leverage Business Architecture (step to achieving early value)

24

Analysis of business value for projects based on capability and value related improvements driven by business strategy

Assess Opportunities to Leverage Business Architecture (step to achieving early value)

25

Positioning and communicating business priorities using business architecture terminology and concepts

Assess Opportunities to Leverage Business Architecture (step to achieving early value)

26

Globalization efforts to realign the regionally focused enterprise

Assess Opportunities to Leverage Business Architecture (high visibility initiatives)

27

Shifting to a customer focused, versus product line or regionally focused, business model

Assess Opportunities to Leverage Business Architecture (high visibility initiatives)

28

Business unit consolidation and realignment

Assess Opportunities to Leverage Business Architecture (high visibility initiatives)

29

Establishment of a joint venture or business capability outsourcing

Assess Opportunities to Leverage Business Architecture (high visibility initiatives)

30

Should be put in place early, but must be based on the premise of business ownership, business sponsorship, and representation from essential business areas

Establish Business Architecture Governance Structure

31

Should be established prior to moving too quickly in subsequent stages of deployment

Establish Business Architecture Governance Structure

32

The capability map is the one foundational aspect of business architecture that readily maps to each of the other foundational aspects: organization, value, and information

Establish Business Architecture Baseline (capability map as a foundation)

33

Capability maps establish a common vocabulary upon which to base information maps

Establish Business Architecture Baseline (capability map as a foundation)

34

Capability maps take the most time to establish yet provide the most comprehensive view of what a business does at its core

Establish Business Architecture Baseline (capability map as a foundation)

35

Capabilities offer the most flexible mapping to the extended business architecture as well as IT application architecture

Establish Business Architecture Baseline (capability map as a foundation)

36

Identifying pressing business issues that leverage the business architecture

Leverage Business Architecture in Initiative Planning (activities)

37

Using the business architecture to establish the project scope for each of these initiatives

Leverage Business Architecture in Initiative Planning (activities)

38

Using the business architecture to establish the project scope for each of these initiatives

Leverage Business Architecture in Initiative Planning (activities)

39

Updating capability and value stream stage heat map ratings

Expand Business Architecture (activities)

40

Adding increasingly detailed views to various maps

Expand Business Architecture (activities)

41

Evolving the organization map

Expand Business Architecture (activities)

42

Incorporating new information concepts

Expand Business Architecture (activities)

43

Extending business architecture into other areas as required

Expand Business Architecture (activities)

44

Refinement of the business architecture to reflect ongoing business transformation and related changes

Refine Business Architecture Governance & Deployment (activities)

45

More detailed capability mapping based on emerging scenarios and transformation requirements

Refine Business Architecture Governance & Deployment (activities)

46

Additional and more granular value mapping / capability mapping

Refine Business Architecture Governance & Deployment (activities)

47

Expanded or more detailed mappings across business architecture and business-to-IT architecture

Refine Business Architecture Governance & Deployment (activities)

48

Use of business architecture on an increasingly broadening set of business transformation scenarios

Refine Business Architecture Governance & Deployment (activities)

49

Expanded use of business architecture in strategy and roadmap creation, budgeting and funding, and partner and outsourcing alignment

Refine Business Architecture Governance & Deployment (activities)

50

Must be in a senior leadership role within the business (not IT).

Business Sponsor:

51

It is very difficult to build a capability map without this role because capability naming, definition development, validation, socialization, and utilization all hit roadblocks

Business Sponsor:

52

Effort should be led by a business lead or at a minimum a business architect with deep business knowledge.

Business Lead:

53

The important factor is for someone from the business to be the face of the business architecture effort

Business Lead:

54

There should always be this role, who can facilitate working sessions, refine the capability mapping, and help socialise the map.

Business Co-Lead:

55

This person must be from a business unit that represents a mainstream aspect of the business.

Business Co-Lead:

56

The team will need to have a core set of representatives with knowledge of all major aspects of the business.

Core Subject Matter Experts:

57

The focus for these individuals is to map out as much of the customer-facing and selected strategic capabilities as possible.

Core Subject Matter Experts:

58

Well-versed in capability mapping and business architecture in general.

Mentor:

59

Does not lead working sessions, he or she would participate in these sessions and work behind the scenes to ensure that the team leverages and benefits from best practices.

Mentor:

60

Specialise in the knowledge, information and wisdom needs of the organisation.

Information Architects

61

Trained in techniques for modelling business information and linking it to the other viewpoints of the business architecture.

Information Architects

62

Experts on data modelling and organising enterprise data for a variety of scenarios.

Data Architects

63

Do not have the business knowledge or access to business professionals required to create the information map from a business perspective.

Data Architects

64

Live within a subject area typically defined by a common capability.

Data Stewards

65

May already have completed some of the groundwork required to align terms and definitions across a given area, which is typically defined by a level one capability.

Data Stewards

66

Are responsible for the quality of the data they represent.

Data Stewards

67

Act as conduits between business and IT and typically are experienced in the subject area

Data Champions

68

Have knowledge of who would be engaged to ensure that the all parties have bought into various terms and definitions.

Data Champions

69

Ensuring the effective delivery of a viable, robust business architecture requires that

Certain roles are filled.

70

Because business architecture is owned by the business, sponsorship must be established

Within the business.

71

Building sponsorship is often done incrementally with one business executive

Coming on board and working to “sell” his or her colleagues on the concept.

72

When __ or __ are under- represented in a multiline organisation, the value of the business architecture is greatly diminished.

Product lines or divisions

73

A team attempting to build executive support for business architecture could approach ___, ___, or ___.

An executive steering committee, senior portfolio team, or a team of business executives that own the role of strategic planning and transformation.

74

Creating robust, viable business architecture requires (2)

Business knowledge and business credibility.

75

A business architecture team should be led by business leaders with

Roots and reporting responsibility in the business.

76

Business Architecture team leadership in this scenario does not imply that individuals dictate __, __, or __ but rather facilitate, communicate, and motivate.

Direction, content, or approach

77

Business Architecture team leadership in this scenario does not imply that individuals dictate direction, content, or approach but rather (3)

Facilitate, communicate, and motivate.

78

Co-leadership addresses practical challenges of (3)

Timing, parallel commitments, and division of labor.

79

Options are based on team dynamics and should not be dictated by anyone outside the team if possible.

Business Architecture team leadership

80

This role should be taken into consideration when selecting a team leader.

Executive communication

81

The business architecture team requires a core team of business professionals with

Knowledge of all major aspects of the business.

82

Mainstream business units should have representation for all essential aspects of

Major customer facing capabilities and value streams.

83

There are two kinds of business architecture team participants:

“Core” and “virtual”

84

Are expected to participate in drafting level 1 and 2 capabilities and also expected to be at any meeting that crosses into their subject area.

Core participants

85

Core participants are expected to participate in

Drafting level 1 and 2 capabilities

86

Core participants are expected to be at

Any meeting that crosses into their subject area.

87

Virtual team members are engaged

As required.

88

One test to see if a business unit should have core versus virtual participation is to determine ___ if these business units are excluded from certain mapping activities.

What type of analysis gaps are created

89

One test to see if a business unit should have core versus virtual participation is to determine what type of analysis gaps are created ___ if these business units are excluded from certain mapping activities.

For customer facing capabilities and externally focused value streams

90

Business architecture team leads and subject matter experts should focus their time and energy on establishing a robust business architecture that

Establishes a common business vocabulary that is recognised and leveraged across business units.

91

Should focus their time and energy on establishing a robust business architecture that establishes a common business vocabulary that is recognised and leveraged across business units.

Business architecture team leads and subject matter experts

92

The mapping and governance expert assembles and organises

Analysis results into a formal knowledgebase

93

The mapping and governance expert can develop the formal and ad hoc blueprints required to

Communicate and leverage business architecture with a wide variety of stakeholders.

94

The person in this role should have expertise in standard capability, value, organization, and information mapping as well as the ability to expand these views so they align to various extended views of business architecture.

Architecture Mapping Expert

95

The person in this role should have the ability to expand foundational views so they align to various extended views of business architecture.

Architecture Mapping Expert

96

Many organisations lack in-house expertise in building, communicating, and leveraging business architecture and seek

Outside mentoring advice.

97

Not inherently natural skill for many in-house individuals who more often than not gravitate to the path of least resistance when identifying capabilities.

Creating a capability map

98

A capability map that does not actually represent capabilities of a business will ___ creating (2)

Destabilize a business architecture long-term, creating redundancies and inconsistencies

99

Business leaders and subject matter experts serve as facilitators in order to establish (3)

Business ownership, accountability, and expertise

100

Provides behind-the-scenes guidance related to team building, governance, mapping and blueprint creation.

The mentor

101

The mentor provides behind-the-scenes guidance related to __, __, __ and __, and integration into strategies, projects, and related architectures.

Team building, governance, mapping and blueprint creation

102

The mentor provides behind-the-scenes guidance related to team building, governance, mapping and blueprint creation, and integration into (3)

Strategies, projects, and related architectures.

103

Understanding and establishing the competencies required for the role of business architect is fundamental to the

Successful, value-driving implementation of business architecture

104

Provide the fundamental starting point from which a business architecture practice can orient and grow within organisations.

Competencies

105

Based on a sound understanding of the maturity of the organisation, maturity of business architecture within the organisation, and maturity of the individual practitioners.

Successful selection and optimisation of business architecture team competencies

106

Successful selection and optimisation of business architecture team competencies is based on a sound understanding of the maturity of (3)

Maturity of the organisation, maturity of business architecture within the organisation, and maturity of the individual practitioners.

107

Such a team provides the horizontal vision necessary to direct and benefit from business architecture

Strategy and Transformation Team

108

May be considered the primary customer of the business architecture team.

Strategy and Transformation Team

109

Provides the team with insight into complex horizontal business challenges and the ability to deliver value to the business.

Executive access

110

Along with principles, the centre of excellence should also establish a

Clear purpose for business architecture

111

Often called the “elevator pitch”

Clear purpose for business architecture

112

Participation in business mapping is appropriate to the breadth of topic areas being mapped.

Sample business architecture team principle

113

Mapping efforts align by capability, value stream, information, or other views.

Sample business architecture team principle

114

Mapping participants have firsthand knowledge of the portions of the business being
mapped.

Sample business architecture team principle

115

Blueprint structure and composition is appropriate to the audience of the blueprint.

Sample business architecture team principle

116

Overriding driver is cross-business unit / cross-disciplinary collaboration.

Sample business architecture team principle

117

Scope of the business architecture is defined by the scope of the business.

Sample business architecture team principle

118

There is open exchange of information and ideas with all areas of the business.

Sample business architecture team principle

119

Models, ideas, concepts, and plans are open to all participants unless it violates privacy, confidentiality, or security.

Sample business architecture team principle

120

The first task of a business architecture team should involve establishing a governance structure that enables

The team to meet management’s mandate while further allowing the team to scale up or down as appropriate.

121

The success of the business architecture effort revolves around ensuring that

The proper degree of representation is involved in build out efforts.

122

Firsthand knowledge requires

Direct business participation as appropriate to the topics being mapped.

123

Firsthand knowledge is required to

Establish a business architecture that embodies a true reflection of the business.

124

The importance of virtual business architects increases in direct proportion to

The size and regional spread of the business.

125

Large, geographically dispersed organisations will face a

Longer, more challenging road to achieving business architecture maturity

126

Adherence to basic governance principles become increasingly important in these situations.

Large, geographically dispersed organisations

127

Ability to look beyond traditional business concepts and drill to the heart of a given concept

Basic skills for the business architect include (1/6):

128

The drive to introspectively challenge traditional terminology when it does not accurately depict an aspect of the business, is misleading or inconsistent

Basic skills for the business architect include (2/6):

129

Communication skills to create and socialize the business architecture

Basic skills for the business architect include (3/6):

130

Business subject area expertise appropriate to the role and areas being mapped

Basic skills for the business architect include (4/6):

131

Basic understanding of blueprint structures necessary for capability, organization, value, and information mapping

Basic skills for the business architect include (5/6):

132

Patience to work collaboratively to ensure that the business architecture truly reflects the business

Basic skills for the business architect include (6/6):

133

Team leaders must have advanced

Mapping skills along with the ability to facilitate working sessions

134

Team leaders must collaborate with

Other teams and management, and communicate with executives.

135

Team leaders become the face of the team in many cases and must have

Good overall communication skills.

136

Business unit business architects must have

even more extensive knowledge of certain subject areas within the business

137

Business unit business architects must the ability to

Identify and engage with an extended body of subject matter experts within a given business area.

138

These business unit business architects must be experts in

Subject matters unique to their business units or have direct access to those subject matter experts.

139

Must have detailed, extensive skills in capability, organisation, value, and information mapping.

The business architecture mapping expert

140

Must be able to incorporate capabilities, business unit, aspects of value maps, and information concepts into extended and customised blueprints as required by a given business scenario.

The business architecture mapping expert

141

This role runs along a spectrum with the ability to communicate and collaborate across teams being an overriding skill factor

The business architect

142

The focus of this is business architect role outcomes, which define the role of business architect.

The Business Architect Competency Model

143

Provide the necessary link between the activities the business architect has to perform and the specific views of value within the business that are considered essential by executives.

Outcomes

144

The way to use __ is to first understand the perceptions of value as described by the needs of executives, and then to determine the consequent role outcomes that are required to satisfy these needs.

The Business Architect Competency Model

145

Business architect role activities are usually quite specific to a given

Business, industry, maturity, and strategic context

146

Are usually quite specific to a given business, industry, maturity, and strategic context.

Business architect role activities

147

Will, to a large extent, remain the same.

Role outcomes

148

The business architect competencies consist of three different categories of skills:

Business knowledge & experience
Emotional intelligence & behavioural skills
Professional skills & qualifications

149

Contribute to business architect competency

Business knowledge & experience, emotional intelligence & behaviours, and professional skills & qualifications

150

Is applied to business architect role activities, which drive business architecture role outcomes that deliver business value.

Business architect competency

151

Drive business architecture role outcomes that deliver business value.

Business architect role activities

152

Deliver business value.

Business architecture role outcomes

153

It is easier to communicate the value of a business architect to executives

Advantage of using a Business Architect Competency Model

154

It is easier for a business architect to understand the expectations placed upon them

Advantage of using a Business Architect Competency Model

155

It is easier to identify the relevance of training and development with respect to the role.

Advantage of using a Business Architect Competency Model

156

1. Decision Alignment – Executive decisions have to be aligned up and down the decision tree to be effective.

Core outcomes of a Business Architect Competency Model (1/4)

157

Executive decisions have to be aligned up and down the decision tree to be effective.

1. Decision Alignment (Business Architect Competency Model Core outcome)

158

2. Strategic Business Alignment – The business has to be aligned to strategy.

Core outcomes of a Business Architect Competency Model (1/4)

159

The business has to be aligned to strategy.

2. Strategic Business Alignment (Business Architect Competency Model Core outcome)

160

3. Business Transparency – It should be possible to understand the causality within the
business.

Core outcomes of a Business Architect Competency Model (3/4)

161

It should be possible to understand the causality within the
business.

3. Business Transparency (Business Architect Competency Model Core outcome)

162

4. Stakeholder Satisfaction – Stakeholder buy-in needs to be achieved and maintained so that results can be achieved.

Core outcomes of a Business Architect Competency Model (4/4)

163

Stakeholder buy-in needs to be achieved and maintained so that results can be achieved.

4. Stakeholder Satisfaction (Business Architect Competency Model Core outcome)

164

This model works as a foundation onto which extensions from a business architecture “competencies & skills palette” can be applied.

Business Architect Competency Model