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Flashcards in Cardio PE Deck (17):
1

JVP Mesurement 

Should be considered routinely with pts with CHF

Assess volume overload

2

Hepatojugular reflux test

Should be considered routinely with pts with CHF

Assess volume overload

3

Left lateral positional heart sound ascultation

Can be doen to more clearly assess tricuspid and mitral murmurs

Easier to palpate PMI 

May be easier to see and hear S3 and S4

4

Leaning forward heart sound auscultation

Can hear aortic and pulmonic murmurs more clearly

5

Standing heart sound auscultation

May accentuate murmurs associated with mitral valve prolapse or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Will make aortic stenosis murmur softer

6

Squatting or valsalva auscultation 

may accentuate aortic stenosis murmur

will decrease intensity of mitral valve prolapse and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

 

7

Allen's Test

Tests patency of radial and ulnar arteries

Raynaud's

8

Homan's test

Assess DVT of the leg

9

Ankle Brachial Index (ABI)

Test to assess for peripheral artery disease 

10

Midsystolic murmurs

Most common type

Innocent

Physiologic--from changes in metabolism

Pathologic--from structural abnormality in heart or great vessels

 

11

Pansystolic (Holosystolic) Murmurs

Pathologic

Caused by blood flowing from one chamber of high pressure to chamber of lower pressure through a valve or structure that should be closed 

Mitral regurgitation 
Tricuspid regurgitation
Ventricular septal defect

12

Systolic Clicks 

Usually due to mitral valve prolapse

Usually mid or late systolic

Heard best b/w lower LSB and PMI with diaphragm

Often followed by murmur from mitral regurgitation 

Squatting delays

Standing moves it closer to S1

13

Diastolic murmurs 

almost always indicate disease

Two main types: 

  • Aortic regurgitation 
    • Heard best at base, pt sitting forward 
    • If S3/S4 present, suggests more severe disease
  • Mitral stenosis 
    • Low pitched and located near PMI 
    • L lateral decubitus position 

14

Murmurs with systolic and diastolic components

Venous hum 

Patent ductus arteriosus 

Pericardial friction rub 

15

Venous hum

Benign 

Usually in young children 

From turbulent blood flowing through jugular veins 

Disappears with compression of jugular

16

Patent Ductus Arteriosis

Congenital patent opening between pulmonary artery and aorta 

Usually not heard until 7-10 days when systemic and pulmonary pressure gradients are established

17

Pericardial friction rub

Best heard over pulmonic area 

Crunchy or squeaky 

Look for underlying causes: 
Trauma
Illness
Tumor