Chapter 1: The Problem of Knowledge Terms to Remember Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapter 1: The Problem of Knowledge Terms to Remember Deck (44):
1

argument ad ignorantiam

fallacy of believing that the fact you can't prove something ISN'T true means that it IS true

2

common sense

has many underlying inaccuracies and biases

3

mental map

personal common-sense picture of the world
what is true/false, reasonable/unreasonable, right/wrong, etc.

4

mercator projection

Eurocentric map of the world

5

Hobo-Dyer Equal Area Projection

Pacific-centric/"distorted" map of the world; reflects relative land sizes of land masses; upside down

6

Paradox of cartography

if a map is to be useful, then by necessity it must be imperfect
Perfect map would have to be a scale of 1:1 (useless)

7

The map is not the territory

well-known slogan

8

language, perception, reason and emotion; certainty

ways of knowing (blank...) give us knowledge, but not (blank)

9

language

means by which we acquire knowledge among people
not always reliable

10

perception

life based on personal experience, but deceptive in some senses (limited)

11

reason

claimed to give greater certainty than perception
does not necessarily follow in all cases (liable for errors because of inability for abstract reasoning)

12

emotion

intuition is not identical for everyone
energy to pursue knowledge
not infallible

13

What if everything is a figment of someone else's imagination?

I think, therefore I am.
BUT... (question)

14

radical doubt

term for illusory supposition
i.e. Truman Burbank on "The Truman Show"

15

relativism

no absolute truth is objectively independent of our beliefs

16

judgment

balancing skepticism and open-mindedness (but not gullibility)
we rely on (blank), rather than certainties

17

skeptical

if we are too (blank), knowledge cannot progress

18

evidence and coherence

"knowledge plausibility"/"reasonable knowledge" is based on (blank)

19

evidence

supports the reasonability of a belief (one of two criteria)

20

confirmation bias

tendency to look for evidence that supports the argument

21

coherence

determining whether or not the belief is reasonable;
we cannot cast doubt on all of our beliefs at the same time (examine them one at a time against the background)

22

periodical evaluation

We are what we believe, and these affect our behavior.
In order to be responsible, we must allow (blank) of our beliefs.

23

(blank) has many underlying inaccuracies and biases

common sense

24

personal common-sense picture of the world
what is true/false, reasonable/unreasonable, right/wrong, etc.

mental map

25

Eurocentric map of the world

mercator projection

26

Pacific-centric/"distorted" map of the world; reflects relative land sizes of land masses; upside down

Hobo-Dyer Equal Area Projection

27

if a map is to be useful, then by necessity it must be imperfect
Perfect map would have to be a scale of 1:1 (useless)

Paradox of cartography

28

well-known slogan

The map is not the territory

29

ways of knowing (blank...) give us knowledge, but not (blank)

language, perception, reason and emotion; certainty

30

means by which we acquire knowledge among people
not always reliable

language

31

life based on personal experience, but deceptive in some senses (limited)

perception

32

claimed to give greater certainty than perception
does not necessarily follow in all cases (liable for errors because of inability for abstract reasoning)

reason

33

intuition is not identical for everyone
energy to pursue knowledge
not infallible

emotion

34

I think, therefore I am.
BUT... (question)

What if everything is a figment of someone else's imagination?

35

term for illusory supposition
i.e. Truman Burbank on "The Truman Show"

radical doubt

36

no absolute truth is objectively independent of our beliefs

relativism

37

balancing skepticism and open-mindedness (but not gullibility)
we rely on (blank), rather than certainties

judgment

38

if we are too (blank), knowledge cannot progress

skeptical

39

"knowledge plausibility"/"reasonable knowledge" is based on (blank)

evidence and coherence

40

supports the reasonability of a belief (one of two criteria)

evidence

41

fallacy of believing that the fact you can't prove something ISN'T true means that it IS true

argument ad ignorantiam

42

tendency to look for evidence that supports the argument

confirmation bias

43

determining whether or not the belief is reasonable;
we cannot cast doubt on all of our beliefs at the same time (examine them one at a time against the background)

coherence

44

We are what we believe, and these affect our behavior.
In order to be responsible, we must allow (blank) of our beliefs.

periodical evaluation