Chapter 16- Tropical Meteorology Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapter 16- Tropical Meteorology Deck (43):
1

42.38.2
Interpret a simplified diagram of the tropical Hadley Cells (one in each hemisphere)
showing the pattern of horizontal mixing in mid and high latitudes of both
hemispheres.

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2

42.38.4
Explain what is meant by: (a) meteorological (or thermal) equator;

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3

42.38.4
Explain what is meant by: (b) equatorial trough;

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4

42.38.4
Explain what is meant by: (c) intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) ;

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5

42.38.4
Explain what is meant by: (d) South Pacific convergence zone.

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6

42.38.6
Describe the seasonal location of the equatorial trough, and explain the reasons for the
change in location.

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7

42.38.8
State the region where maximum convergence, convection and cloud developments are
found relative to the equatorial trough.

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8

42.38.10
Describe the essential difference between ‘equatorial trough’ and ‘inter-tropical
convergence zone’.

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9

42.38.12
Describe the weather, icing, turbulence and cloud-related factors commonly associated
with an: (a) ‘active’ ITCZ;

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10

42.38.12
Describe the weather, icing, turbulence and cloud-related factors commonly associated
with an: (b) ‘inactive’ ITCZ.

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11

42.38.14
Describe the origin, preferred location, and characteristics of the South Pacific
Converge Zone.

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12

42.38.16
With the aid of diagrams, explain the following aspects of the ‘trade winds’ in both
hemispheres of the Pacific Ocean: (a) flow pattern;

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13

42.38.16
With the aid of diagrams, explain the following aspects of the ‘trade winds’ in both
hemispheres of the Pacific Ocean: (b) anti-cyclonic subsidence and associated meteorological conditions;

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14

42.38.16
With the aid of diagrams, explain the following aspects of the ‘trade winds’ in both
hemispheres of the Pacific Ocean: (c) approximate horizontal and vertical limits;

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15

42.38.16
With the aid of diagrams, explain the following aspects of the ‘trade winds’ in both
hemispheres of the Pacific Ocean: (d) typical wind velocity normally found above the trade wind zone;

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16

42.38.16
With the aid of diagrams, explain the following aspects of the ‘trade winds’ in both
hemispheres of the Pacific Ocean: (e) seasonal changes in location and their effect on wind direction;

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17

42.38.16
With the aid of diagrams, explain the following aspects of the ‘trade winds’ in both
hemispheres of the Pacific Ocean: (f) typical wind strengths, including variation in strength during the summer and

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18

42.38.16
With the aid of diagrams, explain the following aspects of the ‘trade winds’ in both
hemispheres of the Pacific Ocean: (g) the effect of the trade winds on the weather experienced in island groups and
northern Australia.

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19

42.38.18
Describe the following disturbances experienced in tropical latitudes: (a) individual cumulus disturbances;

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20

42.38.18
Describe the following disturbances experienced in tropical latitudes: (b) mesoscale convective areas;

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21

42.38.18
Describe the following disturbances experienced in tropical latitudes: (c) wave disturbances.

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22

42.38.20
Describe the factors involved in wet monsoons in terms of: (a) seasonal factors;

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23

42.38.20
Describe the factors involved in wet monsoons in terms of: (b) effect of large land masses and orographic obstructions;

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24

42.38.20
Describe the factors involved in wet monsoons in terms of: (c) the location of the major monsoon regions.

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25

42.38.22
With regard to the formation, development and decay of tropical cyclones, describe
the: (a) relationship with the equatorial trough;

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26

42.38.22
With regard to the formation, development and decay of tropical cyclones, describe
the: (b) requirement for, and supply of, thermal energy;

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27

42.38.22
With regard to the formation, development and decay of tropical cyclones, describe
the: (c) effect of high level divergence;

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28

42.38.22
With regard to the formation, development and decay of tropical cyclones, describe
the: (d) mechanics of formation, and characteristics, of the ‘cyclone eye’;

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29

42.38.22
With regard to the formation, development and decay of tropical cyclones, describe
the: (e) requirement for a ‘warm core’.

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30

42.38.24
State the four stages of development of tropical cyclones.

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31

42.38.26
For each stage of development, describe the: (a) atmospheric pressure tendency;

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32

42.38.26
For each stage of development, describe the: (b) typical wind strengths, including variations in wind velocity in, and either side
of, the cyclone eye;

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33

42.38.26
For each stage of development, describe the: (c) typical radii of the affected areas;

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34

42.38.26
For each stage of development, describe the: (d) associated weather, and the location within the cyclone where the worst
conditions are commonly experienced.

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35

42.38.28
Describe the common causes that lead to the decay of tropical cyclones.

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36

42.38.30
State the season during which tropical cyclones are generally experienced.

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37

42.38.32
Explain what is meant by the Walker Circulation based on the factors involved in the: (a) east of the South Pacific Ocean;

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38

42.38.32
Explain what is meant by the Walker Circulation based on the factors involved in the: (b) west of the South Pacific Ocean.

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39

42.38.34
Define the ENSO Index, describe the factors involved when the index changes from
positive to negative and include the effect of these changes on: (a) prevailing winds in tropical and mid latitude regions;

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40

42.38.34
Define the ENSO Index, describe the factors involved when the index changes from
positive to negative and include the effect of these changes on: (b) meteorological conditions experienced in Australasia.

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41

42.38.36
Describe what is meant by ‘streamline analysis’ and state the reason why this analysis
is necessary in tropical latitudes.

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42

42.38.38
Define ‘isotach’ and demonstrate proficiency in interpreting information provided by
isotachs on a chart.

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43

42.38.40
Interpret examples of streamline patterns commonly shown on streamline charts (e.g.
inflows, outflows etc).
Global Meteorology

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