Chapter 2: Rights and legal entitlements of citizens at differing ages Flashcards Preview

GCSE Citizenship: Rights and responsibilities > Chapter 2: Rights and legal entitlements of citizens at differing ages > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chapter 2: Rights and legal entitlements of citizens at differing ages Deck (19):
1

The rights of young people at different ages, these legal rights, have done what over time?

The rights of young people at different ages, these legal rights, have developed over time

2

Describe what you can do at age 10

At age 10, you can:
1. Have your ears pierced, but your parent may have to be with you
2. Choose your own religion
3. Be convicted of a criminal offence
4. Be convicted of a sexual offence, including rape, if you are a boy

3

Describe what you can do at age 12

At age 12, you can:
1. Watch a 12, or 12A rated film, or play a 12 category computer game
2. Be remanded into a secure unit, or secure training facility for persistent offending
3. Be placed on an electronically monitored curfew while you're awaiting a court decision

4

Describe what you can do at age 13

At age 13, you can:
1. Have a part-time job, with some restrictions
2. Have an account on a social networking site like Facebook, or Twitter

5

Describe what you can do at age 14

At age 14, you can:
1. Enter a pub if the landlord allows it, but you cannot buy, or drink alcohol, only soft drinks
2. Be fined £20 for not fastening your seatbelt while in a moving car

6

Describe what you can do at age 15

At age 15, you can:
1. Be remanded to a prison to await trial
2. Be fined up to £1000 and sentenced to prison time, if you are convicted of a criminal offence
3. Rent and buy a 15 category film

7

Describe what you can do at age 16

At age 16, you can:
1. Work full time if you have left school, have a National Insurance number and the job has accredited training
2. Give consent and have sex
3. Be married, or live together with a parent's permission
4. Be prosecuted for having sex with someone who is under 16
5. Apply for your own passport with a parent's consent

8

Describe what you can do at age 17

At age 17, you can:
1. Hold a driver's licence and apply for a motorcycle license
2. Be interviewed by the police without an appropriate adult being present
3. A care order can no longer be made on you

9

Describe what you can do at age 18

At age 18:
1. You can have a tattoo, or body piercing
2. You can change your name
3. You can vote and be called for jury service
4. You can buy and drink alcohol in a bar
5. You can get married, enter a civil partnership, or live together without parental consent
6. You can stand as an MP, or a local councillor
7. National minimum wage entitlement increases

10

Describe what you can do at age 19

At age 19, you:
1. Can no longer get support to help you get into work, or college unless you have learning difficulties, or disabilities
2. Are no longer entitled to free full-time education at school

11

Describe what you can do at age 20

At age 20, you:
1. Are no longer eligible for Care to Learn
2. Are no longer able to access most services for young people, unless you have learning difficulties, or disabilities

12

Describe what you can do at age 21

At age 21, you:
1. Can drive certain kinds of larger vehicles, like lorries, or buses with the appropriate licence
2. Can apply to adopt a child
3. Can get certain types of jobs, like becoming a driving instructor
4. Can apply for a licence to fly commercial transport aeroplanes, helicopters, gyroplanes and airships
5. Can go into 21+ venues (some pubs, clubs and bars)
6. Are now entitled to full national minimum wage

13

Describe what happens at age 22

At age 22, support ends for young people who have been in local authority care (care leavers), unless they are going into higher education

14

Describe what happens at age 25

At age 25:
1. Some benefit entitlements change
2. Support ends for young people who have been in local authority care who went on into higher education
3. Young people with learning difficulties and disabilities can no longer get support from young people's services

15

What do civil law cases involving divorce do?

Civil law cases involving divorce affect a number of young people

16

Civil law cases involving divorce affect a number of young people because of the issues that arise about where the young person will live.
Increasingly, what are taken into account when such decisions are made?

Increasingly, the wishes of the young people are taken into account when such decisions are made

17

In recent years, what have there been?

In recent years, there have been campaigns relating to the rights of young people in regard to:
1. Sexuality
2. Voting

18

In recent years, there have been campaigns relating to the rights of young people in regard to sexuality and voting.
What have others argued for?

Others have argued for better harmonisation of rights at either:
1. 16
Or,
2. 18

19

Civil law cases involving divorce affect a number of young people, because of the issues that arise about what?

Civil law cases involving divorce affect a number of young people, because of the issues that arise about where the young person will live

Decks in GCSE Citizenship: Rights and responsibilities Class (41):