Chaucer Critics Flashcards Preview

English Literature > Chaucer Critics > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chaucer Critics Deck (70):
1

Fradenburg.
Explains how romance and fantasy is ideas as a...

...means of escaping from the problems of the real world

2

Lee Patterson.
Views the prologue and tale as an attack of male...

...supremacy and female subordination. Wife uses wifehood to her own advantage

3

Finke.
The wife's assumed childlessness could be 'symbolic of the...

...barrenness of her life, of her single-minded pursuit of profit

4

Tucker.
The wob is an exceptionally strong woman who takes...

...full advantage of the power of her sexuality

5

Tucker.
Her greatest unhappiness comes in moments...

....when her power and maistrie is being threatened

6

Smith.
The wob embodies a number of negative female characteristics...

...stupidity, arrogance and deceitfulness

7

Gregory.
It is the wife's masks of love that...

...gains her all that she desires

8

Williams.
The wife reduces human love...

...and sex to business transactions

9

Moore.
Overcharged most of his persons with whims and absurdities...

...for which, the circumstances they are engaged in afford but a very dissproportionate vent

10

Leicester.
Alison is an early feminist striving for autonomy...

...is an oppressive patriarchal society

11

Kinnes.
It is chaucer's characters who...

....are more memorable than their tales

12

Hebron.
We might see the wife as sacrificing...

...her femininity in pursuit of a feminist cause

13

Fradenburg.
We must assume the wife of bath is based...

...on one or more real women

14

Smith.
For the wife of bath, money, sex and marriage...

...are all interlinked and none can exist without the other

15

Finlayson.
She's made sex into a metaphorical financial obligation...

...in marriage: the husbands copulation is paying off his debt to his wife

16

Gestsdottir.
In her prologue, the wife argues that...

...there are always two sides to every story

17

Gestadottir.
Women: captives of the...

...patriarchal world

18

Gestsdottir.
Her prologue may be seen as a confession...

....where she confesses her sins but furthermore defends them

19

Pardon says: o ye wommen be ye subgets...

...to you're housbande

20

Gestsdottir.
The wife is not afraid to voice her knowledge of misogyny...

...in her society, and is not afraid to revolt against patriarchy

21

Gestsdottir.
The rapist knight becomes the victim of...

...oppression just as the maiden was a victim of his rape

22

Gestsdottir.
Her motivation in life is to change patriarchy...

...or at least demonstrate the same effect of women's oppression

23

Gestsdottir.
Her tale demonstrates the conflict between the...

....sexes and that surrendering authority to a woman can be rewarding for men

24

Gestsdottir.
The wife has through her many marriages learned that marriage is...

...established on money and the one who has control over economic assets is the one who has sovereignty

25

Gestsdottir.
The wife's prologue centres on how...

....the sexes relate

26

Gestsdottir.
Religion had such a power in the 14th century....

...that it influenced the prevailing attitude to appropriate gender roles

27

Gestsdottir.
Her actions, behaviour and beliefs...

...are not suitable for a woman of her time

28

Day.
He was a believer seeking...

...to affect change

29

Day.
Chaucer is implying that the higher up in the heirarchy....

...the church official, the more likely he is to be corrupt

30

Day.
Enables Chaucer to 'frame a work that revealed and implicitly condemned....

....the corrupt practices of many church officials with impunity

31

Day.
Chaucer was not criticising the entire institution...

...of the Catholic Church but merely some of its officials

32

Day.
These characters are corrupt church officials revealing their true natures....

...and their greed by taking their advantage of the common folk they are bound to serve

33

Day.
S/f by creating a rivalry between the two...

...he adds comic relief to a harsh view of corrupt church officials

34

Day.
The summoner is compared to the lowest members of society...

...and also the lowest of the otherworldly creatures, a fiend from hell

35

Day.
Chaucer's frustration at an institution...

...that was no longer functioning in the best interest of the people

36

Kitteridge.
The wife had stood forth as an opponent of the orthodox view of subordination...

...in marriage, as the upholder of a heretical doctrine, and as the exultant practicer of what she preached

37

Kitteridge.
In this act of chaucer's human comedy, we have found...

...that the wife of bath is in a very real sense, the dominant figure

38

Kitteridge.
She had garnished her sermon with scraps of...

...holy writ and rags and tatters of erudition

39

Kitteridge.
The wife's discourse is not malicious...

...she is too jovial to be ill-natured

40

Kitteridge.
Clerks are always...

....satirising women

41

Tucker.
The wife of bath presents a woman's perspective...

...on the institution of marriage

42

Tucker.
The wife of baths prologue presents her experience of...

...marriage as an economic exchange of sex for wealth

43

Tucker.
Her greatest unhappiness lies in moments...

....where her power of maistrie is threatened

44

Tucker.
The commodification of sex within marriage...

...allows the wife of bath to retain control over her husbands

45

Tucker.
The wife's descriptions of her first three husbands are filled with...

...language that creates a correlation between sex and money

46

Tucker.
Sex if a form of...

...payment within marriage

47

Tucker.
The wife wouldn't take the trouble...

...to please her husbands sexually unless it was for some profit

48

Tucker.
The wife is no victim, rather she is a perpetrator...

...Leicester views the wife as a victim of the commodification of sex in marriage

49

Tucker.
The distinction between good and bad comes...

...from the level of power each man grants her

50

Tucker.
The wife celebrates female freedom...

....and sovereignty in marriage

51

Tucker.
Each served his purpose by helping...

....her fain wealth and status

52

Smith.
The wife's only true power...

...is her sexuality

53

Joyner.
The wife argues against traditional doctrine...

...And against authority as a whole

54

Croft.
Her readiness to admit sin...

...and delight in it is central to her humorous nature

55

Blake.
Her intention lies beneath...

...sarcasm and a purposefully derogatory invective

56

Mann.
In the unending war of the sexes...

...the wife refuses to accept the subordinate position

57

Mann.
disguise is microcosmically represented in the tale...

....to exploit the large-scale falsity of nobility in the 1300s

58

Ally.
The wife is both unintelligent...

...and morally corrupt

59

Brodie.
The use of sex and marriage is necessary because they are....

...the only methods available to women in such an oppressive time

60

Aers.
Chaucer is satirising the system which would have forced...

...young women to trade sex for economic security with old husbands

61

Barr.
Her misunderstandings show her female ignorance. She attempts to talk....

...with female experience but uses a male voice of authority as she quotes all male texts

62

Hansen.
The wife remains mans creation and chaucer's tactics to...

...contradict, reinforce all the stereotypical medieval ideas about women as cruel, emotional and sexually voracious

63

Aers.
Chaucer works over ruling ideas, conventional....

...pieties and the unexamined norms of official culture in a way that subjects them to processes of criticism

64

Gilbert.
One side of the loathy lady manifests as an optimal threat...

...to masculinity, the other as a dark embodiment of female frustration and fear

65

Hansen.
Their sudden reconciliation suggests 'the persistence of those...

...self-indulging hopes of reconciliation that battered wives so often express

66

Mann.
Argues her tirade is simultaneously a demonstration...

...of female bullying and of salutary witness to male oppression

67

Mann.
Chaucer 'gives the old stereotype a new twist by showing that...

...anti-feminist literature produces the angry woman that is purports only to describe

68

Winney.
From misunderstanding biblical texts 'she has overthrown the prohibitive morality...

...of the medieval church and supplanted her own pragmatic doctrine on the ruins

69

Patterson.
Historical reality of medieval life for women. Uses...

...wifehood to own advantage. Attacks male supremacy and female subordination. Niether accepts marriage as a dehumanising institution not rebels against it

70

Carruthers.
The practical bourgeois wife clearly contradicted the idealised image...

...of the subservient wife held up as a model by gentility and the church