Enteric Viruses 1 (7) Flashcards Preview

MSII: Microbiology Unit 6 > Enteric Viruses 1 (7) > Flashcards

Flashcards in Enteric Viruses 1 (7) Deck (19):
1

How is the virology of picornaviruses, noroviruses, rotaviruses similar?

small, naked, icosahedral RNA viruses

2

What type of genome does rotavirus have? why is it's capsid special?

segmented
capsid is double layered

3

Why is infection with rotavirus dangerous?

dehydration from diarrhea

4

What are the sequelae of rotavirus infection?

none

5

How long does an infection with rotavirus usually last?

5 days

6

Describe the disease norovirus causes

short but rough bout of vomiting and diarrhea
~48 hours

7

Why does norovirus tend to have less dehydration than rotavirus?

tends to affect older patients and has a shorter course

8

Is there a vaccine available for rotavirus or norovirus?

only rotavirus - not required but is available

9

Enteroviruses, a subset of picornaviruses, do their main replication where? If viremia occurs, where does replication occur?

main - GUT
viremia - LNs

10

What is the most effective way to prevent infection with all picornavirus, rotavirus, norovirus?

washing your hands

11

How are the three viruses able to be transmitted fecal orally?

all environmentally rugged

12

>90% of enteroviruses resolve asymptomatically, what happens to the other 10%? why ?

invasion of the CNS
CD155 receptor is common to gut lymph and gray matter

13

How does the enterovirus enter the CNS?

by crossing the BBB or retrograde axonal transport from periphery

14

Where is the main location in the CNS that enteroviruses like to infect? what results therefore?

anterior motor horns
flaccid asymmetric weakness and/or resp. failure

15

Why are we able to make a vaccine for poliovirus (a type of enterovirus)?

humans are the only host - so we are able to erradicate!

16

What are some risk factors for CNS progression of the poliovirus?

-immunosuppression
-pregnancy
-tonsilectomy
-advanced or young age
-recent hard exercise

17

What type of vaccine for the poliovirus do we use here? what type do we use in the developing world?

here - inactivated
developing world - attenuated

18

What is the main risk of the attenuated polio vaccine?

if patient or contact is immunosuppressed is infected with another enterovirus - at risk for genetic exchange to occur and they may get polio-like symptoms

19

What is the treatment for polio?

supportive care and physical therapy - need to train muscles