Entertaining A Guest II Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Entertaining A Guest II Deck (32):
1

So how was your flight?

So how was your flight?

2

How was the weather when you left New York?

How was the weather when you left New York?

3

The weather here is usually nicer than back home.

The weather here is usually nicer than back home.

4

How often do you play golf?

I get out on the green to play about once or twice a week.

5

What do you do on the weekends?

We play tennis every weekend.

6

Do they play tennis?

No, they don't. They don't like tennis very much, but they often go biking together.

7

How often does he go swimming?

He goes swimming every morning.

8

What does she do on the weekends?

She usually goes surfing on Saturdays.

9

Does it cost anything to exercise in the park?

No, it doesn't. You can run, bike, or hike in the park for free.

10

Do you often go running in the park?

Alex doesn't usually play soccer on the weekends.

11

What would be an appropriate response to this remark from your new acquaintance?

Qual seria uma resposta apropriada a essa observação de seu novo conhecido?

12

The flight was just awful. We had turbulence the whole way.

O voo foi horrível. Nós tivemos turbulência durante todo o caminho.

13

I'm sure you were praying hard

Tenho certeza que você estava orando muito

14

Was the weather a problem?

O tempo foi um problema?

15

You just picked up your guest from the airport.

Você acabou de pegar seu convidado no aeroporto.

16

Why don't you take your wife on the golf course with you once in a while?

Por que você não leva sua esposa no campo de golfe com você de vez em quando?

17

Once in a while it's a good idea to turn off your computer and phone so you can just relax.

De vez em quando, é uma boa idéia desligar o computador e o telefone para relaxar.

18

The weather was pretty miserable, actually. Hot, humid, and sticky.

miserable: adjective - terrible; not good

19

Jason often runs into problems with getting computer access

run into: phrasal verb - to experience problems; to encounter difficulties

20

We ran into a lot of turbulence.

run into: phrasal verb - to experience problems; to encounter difficulties

21

We sometimes go scuba diving off the coast for a few days.

scuba diving: noun - The sport of swimming underwater with tanks full of air

22

Tim loves to go scuba diving in the Bahamas.

scuba diving: noun - The sport of swimming underwater with tanks full of air

23

I seldom get the chance to play more than once a month.

seldom: adverb - rarely

24

Hyun-Sun seldom arrives at work late.

seldom: adverb - rarely

25

She might beat me, and then I'd never hear the end of it!

never hear the end of it: phrase - When you've had to listen to someone talk about something for longer than they should, you can say that you never heard the end of it.

26

I bet my husband that he couldn't finish painting the living room walls before noon. When he did, I never heard the end of it.

never hear the end of it: phrase - When you've had to listen to someone talk about something for longer than they should, you can say that you never heard the end of it.

27

Making Small Talk

Patendo papo

28

A: How often do you play golf?
B: I get out on the green to play about once or twice a week.

A: What do you do on the weekends?
B: We play tennis every weekend.

A: Do they play tennis?
B: No, they don't. They don't like tennis very much, but they often go biking together.

When talking about things that are generally true, such as routines and habits, use the simple present. For subjects "I," "you," "we," and "they," use auxiliary "do" to ask questions. Use "don't" to make negative statements.

29

A: How often does he go swimming?
B: He goes swimming every morning.

A: What does she do on the weekends?
B: She usually goes surfing on Saturdays.

A: Does it cost anything to exercise in the park?
B: No, it doesn't. You can run, bike, or hike in the park for free.

When discussing general truths with subjects "he," she," and "it," add an "s" to the main verb for positive statements. Use "does" plus the simple form of the verb for questions. Use "doesn't" plus the simple form of the verb for negative statements.

30

Do you often go running in the park?

Alex doesn't usually play soccer on the weekends.

We sometimes play basketball after work.
Sometimes, we play basketball after work.

Sarah never goes camping.

Adverbs of frequency (such as "always," "often," "usually," "sometimes," and "never") are placed immediately before the main verb of the sentence. "Sometimes" may be moved to the beginning of the sentence for emphasis.

31

I play golf once or twice a week.

You should take a break once in a while.

We don't play baseball very often.

Every week, they try to get a couple of hours of exercise in.

Longer phrases about frequency ( such as "twice a week," "once in a while," or "every week") go at the end of the sentence. When "often" is used in a negative sentence, it also goes at the end of the sentence. You can move them to the beginning of the sentence for emphasis, but you must place a comma to show where it ends.

32

Yuki is watching TV right now. He watches the same show every week.

Anna is taking a karate class. She usually practices for an hour after work every day.

I don't like sushi. It tastes strange to me. I prefer fish tacos.

Use the simple present if a thing is generally true, to express routines or habits, or for verbs that describe physical or emotional states (e.g., "like," "taste," "prefer"). Use the present progressive for things that are happening right now and for things that are going on during this time, but not "right now" (e.g., "She is taking a class.").