Hit Parade 1-3 Flashcards Preview

GRE Vocabulary (Princeton) > Hit Parade 1-3 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Hit Parade 1-3 Deck (215):
1

abate

to lessen in intensity or degree

interest in the author's home abated as her novels waned in popularity

2

accolade

an expression of praise

for their exceptional bravery the firefighters received accolades from both local and national officials

3

aesthetic

dealing with, appreciative of, or responsible to art or the beautiful

There are practical as well as aesthetic reasons for planting trees.

4

ameliorate

to make better or more tolerable

trying to ameliorate the suffering of people who have lost their jobs

5

ascetic

one who practices rigid self-denial, especially as an act of religious devotion

“That's where Cindy draws the line. That's probably a real good idea,” he says. Mattsson, ascetic for a bachelor, imposes the same rule on himself. LeBeau, who has never been married, is much less restrained.

6

avarice

greed, especially for wealth (adj. form avaricious)

The corporate world is plagued by avarice and a thirst for power.

7

axiom

a universally recognized principle; a maxim widely accepted on its intrinsic merit

one of the key axioms of the theory of evolution

8

burgeon

to grow rapidly or flourish

the burgeoning trees

9

bucolic

rustic and pastoral; characteristic of rural areas and their inhabitants; of the country or country life

Pine Ridge … . Its generic blandness and vaguely bucolic quality anticipated similar names—the Oak Parks and River Groves and Lake Forests and Chestnut Hills

10

cacophony

a gathering of dissonant sounds

11

canon

an established set of principles or code of laws, often religious in nature

12

dogma

a belief or set of beliefs that is accepted by the members of the group without being questioned or doubted

These new findings challenge the current dogma in the field.

13

castigation

severe criticism or punishment

The author castigated the prime minister as an ineffective leader.

14

catalyst

reaction without itself changing; a person or thing that causes change

15

caustic

burning or stinging, causing corrosion

The chemical was so caustic that it ate through the pipes.

16

chary

wary, cautious, sparing; hesitant and vigilant about dangers and risks

chary investors who weren't burned by the dot-com bust

17

cogent

appealing forcibly to the mind or reason; (of an argument or case) clear, logical, and convincing.

the results of the DNA fingerprinting were the most cogent evidence for acquittal

18

complaisance

the willingness to comply with the wishes of others

19

affable

friendly; being pleasant and at ease in talking to others

a lively and affable young fellow

20

contentious

argumentative, quarrelsome, causing controversy or disagreement

21

contrite

regretful; penitent; seeking forgiveness (noun form: contrition)

being contrite is not enough to spare you an arrest if you're caught shoplifting

22

culpable

deserving blame

He's more culpable than the others because he's old enough to know better.

23

dearth

smallness in quantity or number; scarcity; a lack

there was a dearth of usable firewood at the campsite

24

demur

to question or oppose; to politely refuse to accept a request or suggestion

pretend Bartleby quote:
"But again Bartleby would demur, I prefer not to."

25

didactic

intending to teach a lesson

26

discretion

cautious reserve in speech; the ability to make responsible decisions

27

disinterested

free of bias or self-interest; impartial

28

dogmatic

expressing a rigid opinion based on unproved or improvable principles

a critic's dogmatic insistence that abstract expressionism is the only school of 20th century art worthy of serious study

29

ebullience

the quality of lively or enthusiastic expression of thoughts and feelings

Team of Rivals. "Thiis horrific train of events transformed Stanton's spirit. his natural ebullience faded."

30

esoteric

intended for or understood by a small, specific group

the article was esoteric in nature; no one but those deep in the engineering community could truly understand its weight

31

eclectic

composed of elements drawn from various sources

her tastes in music were so eclectic that one could see her at an international music festival and a rock concert in the same day

32

emollient

soothing, esp. to the skin; making less harsh; mollifying; an agent that softens or soothes the skin

an emollient hand lotion

33

mollify

to make (someone) less angry : to calm (someone) down

All attempts to mollify the extremists have failed.

34

empirical

originating in or based on observation or experience

guidelines for raising children are based on empirical evidence

35

pragmatic

relating to matters of fact or practical affairs often to the exclusion of intellectual or artistic matters : practical as opposed to idealistic

His pragmatic view of public education comes from years of working in city schools.

36

enigmatic

mysterious; obscure; difficult to understand (noun form: enigma)

To his friends, he was always something of an enigma.

37

ephemeral

fleeting, temporary, only lasting a short time

the autumnal blaze of colors is always to be treasured, all the more so because it is so ephemeral

38

eulogy

a speech honoring the dead (verb: form eulogize)

39

exonerate

to remove blame

the culprit was exonerated of his crime when it was discovered that the victim disappeared because she had run away of her own volition

40

facetious

used to describe speech that is meant to be funny but that is usually regarded as annoying, silly, or not proper

a facetious and tasteless remark about people in famine-stricken countries being spared the problem of overeating

41

fallacy

an invalid or incorrect notion; a mistaken belief

The fallacy of their ideas about medicine soon became apparent.

42

furtive

done with or expressive of stealth : sly

We exchanged furtive smiles across the table

43

gregarious

sociable; outgoing; enjoying the company of other people

a gregarious child who ran up to every person on the playground and wanted to be their friend

44

harangue

a speech addressed to a public assembly; a ranting speech or writing

He delivered a long harangue about the evils of popular culture.

45

heretical

violating accepted dogma or convention (noun form: heresy)

The church regards them as heretics

46

hyperbole

an exaggerated statement; often used as a figure of speech

"enough food to feed a whole army” is a common example of hyperbole

47

impecunious

having very little or no money usually habitually

they were so impecunious that they couldn't afford to give one another even token Christmas gifts

48

incipient

beginning to come into being or become apparent

I have an incipient dislike and distrust of that guy, and I only met him this morning.

49

inert

unmoving, lethargic, sluggish; lacking the ability to move

an inert and lifeless body

50

lethargic

of, relating to, or characterized by laziness or lack of energy : feeling or affected by lethargy

The patient is weak and lethargic.

51

innocuous

producing no injury : harmless
not likely to give offense or to arouse strong feelings or hostility; inoffensive

He told a few innocuous jokes.

52

intransigent

characterized by refusal to compromise or to abandon an extreme position or attitude; uncompromising

He has remained intransigent in his opposition to the proposal.

53

inveigle

to persuade someone to do something in a clever or deceptive way

We inveigled the information from him.

54

morose

sad, sullen, melancholy

He became morose and withdrawn and would not talk to anyone.

55

odious

evoking intense aversion or dislike

56

opaque

not letting light through : not transparent; also, difficult to understand

the opaque water of the muddy river

57

oscillation

the act or state of swinging back and forth with a steady, uninterrupted rhythm (verb form: oscillate)

the sound wave oscillated at a wavelength///

58

penurious

penny-pinching; excessively thrifty; ungenerous

The penurious school system had to lay off several teachers.

59

pernicious

extremely harmful; potentially causing death; causing great harm or damage often in a way that is not easily seen or noticed

More pernicious still has been the acceptance of the author's controversial ideas by the general public.

60

peruse

read; especially : to read over in an attentive or leisurely manner

He perused the newspaper over breakfast.

61

pious

extremely reverent or devout; showing strong religious devotion (noun from: piety)

They lived a quiet, pious life.

62

precursor

one that precedes and indicates or announces another

18th-century lyric poets like Robert Burns were precursors of the Romantics

63

preen

to dress up; to primp; to groom oneself (chiefly british: pin)

64

prodigious

abundant in size, force, or extent; exciting amazement or wonder

a prodigious supply of canned food kept in the basement for emergencies

65

prolific

producing large volumes or amounts; marked by abundant inventiveness or productivity

a famously prolific author who could produce several works of fiction and nonfiction a year

66

putrefy

to rot; to decay and give off a foul odor (adj. form: putrid)

we traced the bad smell to a dead skunk putrefying under the house

67

quaff

to drink deeply; to drink a large amount of something quickly

We stopped at a bar and quaffed a few beers.

68

quiescence

stillness; motionlessness; quality of being at rest (adj. form quiescent)

was struck by the elk's quiescence as it just stood there in the clearing

69

redoubtable

awe-inspiring; worthy of honor

70

sanction

authoritative permission or approval; a penalty intended to enforce compliance; to give permission or authority to

71

satire

a literary work that ridicules or criticizes a human vice through humor or derision

72

derision

the feeling that people express when they criticize and laugh at someone or something in an insulting way

The team's awful record has made it an object of derision in the league.

73

squalid

sordid; wretched and dirty as from neglect

The family lived in squalid conditions.

74

stoic

indifferent to or unaffected by pleasure or pain; steadfast

after waiting six years for permission to immigrate to the U.S., the family is stoic about a six-month postponement

75

supplant

to take the place of; to supersede

old traditions that were fading away and being supplanted by modern ways

76

torpid

lethargic; sluggish; dormant (noun form: torpor)

a torpid sloth that refused to budge off its tree branch

77

ubiquitous

existing everywhere at the same time; constantly encountered; widespread

by that time cell phones had become ubiquitous, and people had long ceased to be impressed by the sight of one

78

urbane

sophisticated; refined; elegant; notably polite or polished in manner

a gentlemanly and urbane host of elegant dinner parties

79

vilify

to defame; to characterize harshly

claimed that she had been vilified by the press because of her conservative views

80

viscous

thick; sticky

viscous syrup that takes forever to pour from a narrow-neck bottle

81

quintessence

(noun) the fifth and highest element in ancient and medieval philosophy that permeates all nature and is the substance composing the celestial bodies; the essence of a thing in its purest and most concentrated form; the most typical example or representative

the Parthenon in Greece was considered the quintessence of the perfectly proportioned building

82

endoscope

an illuminated usually fiber-optic flexible or rigid tubular instrument for visualizing the interior of a hollow organ or part (as the bladder or esophagus) for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes that typically has one or more channels to enable passage of instruments

83

tenuous

having little substance or strength; flimsy; weak

The local theater has had a tenuous existence in recent years.

84

tirade

a long and extremely critical speech; a harsh denunciation

He went into a tirade about the failures of the government.

85

transient

fleeting; brief; passing especially quickly into and out of existence : transitory

had transient thoughts of suicide but never acted on them

86

zealous

fervent; ardent; devoted to a cause (a zealot is a zealous person)

The detective was zealous in her pursuit of the kidnappers.

87

pith (noun)

the essential or central part; core

finally got to the pith of the discussion

88

pithy (adj.)

precise and brief; using few words in a clever and effective way

The book is filled with pithy sayings about love and loss.

89

pedantic

overly concerned with the trivial details of learning or education; show-offish about one's knowledge

90

pine

to yearn intensely; to languish; to lose vigor

91

pervasive

having the tendency to permeate or spread throughout; existing in or spreading through every part of something

television's pervasive influence on our culture

92

permeate

to diffuse through or penetrate something

A feeling of anxiety permeated the office as we rushed to meet the deadline.

93

pirate

to illegally use or produce

94

placate

to appease; to calm by making concessions

95

concessions

the act or an instance of conceding (as by granting something as a right, accepting something as true, or acknowledging defeat)

96

platitude

a superficial remark; esp. one offered as meaningful; dull; insipid

His speech was filled with familiar platitudes about the value of hard work and dedication.

97

insipid

not interesting or exciting : dull or boring

While it is fashionable to write off that decade as an insipid time, one long pajama party, the '50s, in sport at least, were a revolutionary age.

98

plummet

to plunge or drop straight down

99

polemical

controversial; argumentative

an unnecessarily polemical look at the supposed incompatibility between science and religion

100

prodigal

recklessly wasteful; extravagant; profuse; lavish

the prodigal child always spent her allowance the minute she got it

101

profuse

pouring forth liberally

He offered profuse apologies for being late.

102

proliferate

to grow or increase swiftly and abundantly

rumors about the incident proliferated on the Internet

103

queries

questions; inquiries; doubts in the mind; reservations

104

querulous

prone to complaining or grumbling; peevish

105

peevish

fretful; marked by ill temper

I would rather figure things out on my own than ask that peevish librarian for help.

106

rancorous

characterized by bitter, long-lasting resentment

a rancorous autobiography in which the author heaps blame on just about everyone who had the misfortune of knowing him

107

malevolent

having or showing a desire to cause harm to another person

the novel grossly oversimplified the conflict as a struggle between relentlessly malevolent villains on one side and faultless saints on the other

108

recalcitrant

difficult to manage; obstinately defiant of authority

a heart-to-heart talk with the recalcitrant youth revealed that he had a troubled life at home

109

obstinate

refusing to change your behavior or your ideas

his obstinate refusal to obey

110

repudiate

to disown; to refuse to have anything to do with

a generation that has repudiated the values of the past

111

rescind

to invalidate; to repeal; to retract

The navy rescinded its ban on women sailors.

112

reverent

marked by, feeling, or expressing a feeling of profound awe and respect (noun form: reverence)

a reverent crowd of worshippers

113

salubrious

promoting health or well-being

fresh air and exercise are always salubrious

114

solvent

able to meet financial obligations

He couldn't stay solvent after losing his business.

115

specious

seeming true, but actually being fallacious; misleadingly attractive; plausible but false

He justified his actions with specious reasoning.

116

spurious

lacking authenticity or validity; false; counterfeit

a spurious Picasso painting that wouldn't have fooled an art expert for a second

117

succinct

brief; precise

118

subpoena

a court order requiring appearance and/or testimony

119

superfluous

exceeding what is sufficient or necessary; "extra"

cleared off all the superfluous stuff on his desk to make room for the new computer

120

surfeit

an overabundant supply; excess; to feed or supply to excess

ended up with a surfeit of volunteers who simply got in each other's way

121

tenacity

the quality of adherence or persistence to something valued; not easily stopped or pulled apart : firm or strong (adj. form: tenacious)

f there is a particular tenacity in Islamist forms of terrorism today, this is a product not of Islamic scripture but of the current historical circumstance that many Muslims live in places of intense political conflict.

122

germane

relevant to the subject at hand

my personal opinion isn't germane to our discussion of the facts of the case

123

grandiloquence

pompous speech or expression (adj. form: grandiloquent)

the predictably wearisome grandiloquence of the speeches at a political convention

124

hackneyed

rendered trite or commonplace by frequent usage

125

halcyon

calm and peaceful

during those early halcyon years the company's potential for growth seemed unlimited

126

trite

not interesting or effective because of being used too often

by the time the receiving line had ended, the bride and groom's thanks sounded trite and tired

127

hedonism

devotion to pleasurable pursuits, especially to the pleasures of the senses (a hedonist is someone who pursues pleasure)

their spring break trip to Mexico became an exercise in heedless hedonism

128

hegemony

the consistent dominance of one state or ideology over others

They discussed the national government's hegemony over their tribal community.

129

iconoclast

one who attacks or undermines traditional conventions or institutions

notorious as an iconoclast, that music critic isn't afraid to go after sacred cows

130

idolatrous

given to intense or excessive devotion to something (noun form: idolatry)

131

impassive

revealing no emotion

132

imperturbable

marked by extreme calm, impassivity, and steadiness

Although he seems outwardly imperturbable, he can get very angry at times.

133

implacable

not capable of being appeased or significantly changed

He has an implacable hatred for his political opponents.

134

impunity

immunity from punishment or penalty

she mistakenly believed that she could insult people with impunity

135

inchoate

in an initial stage; not fully formed

inchoate feelings of affection for a man whom she had, up till now, thought of as only a friend

136

mendacity

the condition of being untruthful; dishonesty

highly fictionalized “memoirs” in which the facts were few and the mendacities many

137

misanthrope

one who hates all other humans (adj. form: misanthropic)

a former misanthrope who now professes a newly discovered love of mankind

138

mitigate

to make or become less severe or intense

Emergency funds are being provided to help mitigate the effects of the disaster.

139

obdurate

unyielding; hardhearted; intractable; stubbornly persistent in wrongdoing

the obdurate refusal of the crotchety old man to let the neighborhood kids retrieve their stray ball from his backyard

140

crotchety

subject to whims, crankiness, or ill temper

a crotchety old man

141

obsequious

exhibiting a fawning attentiveness

142

occlude

to obstruct or block

143

opprobrium

disgrace; contempt; scorn

144

pedagogy

the profession of teaching or instructing

145

sadomasochism

the derivation of pleasure from the infliction of physical or mental pain either on others or on oneself

146

masochism

pleasure in being abused or dominated : a taste for suffering

147

sadism

a sexual perversion in which gratification is obtained by the infliction of physical or mental pain on others (as on a love object); delight in cruelty

148

acumen

keen, accurate judgement or insight

149

adulterate

to reduce purity by combining with inferior ingredients; to make (something, such as a food or drink) impure or weaker by adding something of poor quality

The company is accused of adulterating its products with cheap additives.

150

amalgamate

to combine several elements into a whole (noun form: amalgamation)

They amalgamated the hospital and the university.

151

aver

to state as a fact; to declare or assert

“I am innocent,” he averred.

152

bolster

to provide support or reinforcement

a convincing argument that was bolstered by the speaker's reputation

153

bombastic

pompous; grandiloquent (noun form: bombast)

a bombastic speech intended to impress the voters in her congressional district

154

diatribe

a harsh denunciation

The article is a diatribe against mainstream media.

155

dissemble

to disguise or conceal; to mislead

he dissembled happiness at the news that his old girlfriend was getting married—to someone else

156

evanescent

tending to disappear like vapor; vanishing

beauty that is as evanescent as a rainbow

157

exacerbate

to make worse or more severe

The proposed factory shutdown would only exacerbate our unemployment problems.

158

fervent

greatly emotional or zealous (noun form: fervor)

a fervent speech that called for tolerance and compassion for those who are different

159

fortuitous

happening by accident or chance (good)

You could not have arrived at a more fortuitous time.

160

voracious

having an insatiable appetite for an activity or pursuit; ravenous

He has a voracious appetite.

161

virulent

extremely harmful or poisonous; bitterly hostile or antagonistic

The country seemed to be returning to the virulent nationalism of its past.

162

truculent

fierce and cruel; ready to fight

die-hard fans who became truculent and violent after their team's loss

163

tortuous

winding, twisting; excessively complicated

164

torque

a force that causes rotation

a car engine delivers torque to the drive shaft

165

synthesis

the process of combining parts to make a whole

166

stymie

to block; thwart

167

stupefy

to stun; baffle

168

sordid

characterized by filth, grime, or squalor

he managed to rise above the sordid streets upon which he grew up

169

solicitous

concerned and attentive, eager

a most solicitous husband, he had already cleaned the house and cooked dinner by the time his wife returned home from work

170

reticent

quiet; reserved; reluctant to express thoughts and feelings

the panel decided to investigate the fraud charges against the company, which has always been reticent about its internal operations

171

relegate

to forcibly assign; esp. to a lower place or position

some psychologists argue that the syndrome should be relegated to a different class of autism

172

refute

to disprove; to successfully argue against

173

recant

to retract; esp. to a previously held belief; renounce

the Inquisition forced Galileo to recant his support of the Copernican observation that the earth revolves around the sun

174

qualms

misgivings; reservations; causes for hesitancy

175

prevaricate

to deliberately avoid the truth; to mislead

during the hearings the witness was willing to prevaricate in order to protect his friend

176

prescience

foreknowledge of events; knowing of events prior to their occurring (adj. form: prescient)

most believers would probably agree that complete prescience is one of God's attributes

177

predilection

a disposition in favor of something; preference

178

precipitate (verb)

to cause to happen before anticipated or required

precipitate a scandal that would cause his expulsion

179

precipitate (adj.)

acting with excessive hast or impulse; exhibiting violent or unwise speed (falling, flowing, or rushing with steep descent)

180

prattle

to babble meaninglessly; to talk in an empty and idle manner

181

perspicacious

acutely perceptive; having keen discernment (noun form: perspicacity)

she was perspicacious in choosing a mate, she had been through horrible previous relationships and was unwilling to waste any time on something that would not work

182

perfunctory

done without care or interest

the violinist delivered a perfunctory performance that displayed none of the passion and warmth he was once known for

183

perfidy

intentional breach of faith; treachery (adj. form perfidious)

he decided to forgive his wife's perfidy, choosing to ascribe it to a moment of uncharacteristic weakness

184

perennial

recurrent through the year or many years; happening repeatedly; continuing without interruption

her perennial pessimism was really starting to annoy her coworkers

185

parody

a humorous imitation intended for ridicule or comic effect, esp. in literature and art

186

Paean

a song or him of praise and thanksgiving

187

Obviate

To anticipate and make unnecessary

Brushing regularly should obviate the need for frequent trips to the dentist

188

Obtuse

Lacking sharpness of intellect; not clear or precise in thought or expression

Forgive me for being obtuse, but I wish you'd explain that to me again

189

Noxious

Harmful; injurious (esp. Morally corrupting)

A noxious new breed of humor in which graphic depictions of torture are presented as entertainment

190

Neologism

A new word, usage, or expression; the creation or use of new words or senses

191

Nebulous

Vague; cloudy; lacking clearly defined form

192

Nascent

Coming into being; in early developmental stages

One of the leading figures in the nascent civil rights movement

193

Mundane

Of the world; typical or concerned with the ordinary

194

Magnanimity

The quality of being generously noble in mind and heart, esp. in forgiving

195

Laud

To praise highly

She was lauded in her efforts

196

Irascible

Easily angered; prone to temperamental outbursts

Forced to endure a memorably irascible boss on her first job after college

197

Inured

Accustomed to accepting something undesirable

The hardship of army training inured her to the rigors of desert warfare

198

Fulminate

To loudly attack of denounce

199

Ingenuous

Artless; frank and candid

200

Extemporaneous

Improvised; done without preparation

Caught by surprise, I had to make an extemporaneous speech at the awards banquet

201

Exigent

Urgent; pressing; requiring immediate action or attention

Started his workday with a flood of exigent matters that required his quick decision

202

Exculpate

(Verb) exonerate; to clear of blame

203

Ennui

(Noun) Dissatisfaction and restlessness resulting from boredom or apathy

The kind of ennui that comes from having too much time on one's hands and too little will to find something productive to do

204

Enervate

To weaken; to reduce in vitality

205

Effrontery

Extreme boldness; presumptuousness

The little squirt had the effrontery to deny eating any cookies, even with the crumbs still on his lips

206

Disabuse

To undeceive; to set right

Let me disabuse you of your foolish notions about married life

207

Convoluted

Complex or complicated

208

Chicanery

Trickery or subterfuge

The candidate only won the election through chicanery

209

Subterfuge

A deceptive device or stratagem

propagandists who use a kind of photographic subterfuge, superimposing one image on another to create a false "reality"

210

Censure

To criticize severely; to officially rebuke

He was censured by the committee for his failure to report the problem

211

Capricious

Inclined to change one's mind impulsively; fickle

212

Canonical

Following or in agreement with accepted, traditional standards (noun form: canon)

213

Assuage

To ease or lessen; to appease or pacify

A mother cooing to her toddler and assuaging his fear of the dark

214

Alacrity

Eager and enthusiastic willingness

Having just acquired his driver's license that morning, the teen agreed with alacrity to drive his cousin to the airport

215

Abscond

To depart clandestinely; to steal off and hide

The burglar was trying to abscond with the jewels when he tumbled down the stairs