III - Tissue Repair, Healing and Fibrosis Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in III - Tissue Repair, Healing and Fibrosis Deck (42):
2

Cells of these tissues are continuously being lost and replaced by maturation from stem cells and by proliferation of mature cells. Can readily regenerate after injury as long as the pool of stem cells is preserved.

Labile tissues(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

3

Cells of theses tissues are quiescent and have only minimal replicative activity in their normal state. Capable of proliferating in response to injury or loss of tissue mass.

Stable tissues(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

4

Cells of these tissues are considered to be terminally differentiated and nonproliferatvie in postnatal life.

Permanent tissues(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.62

5

Labile, stable or permanent tissues:Bone marrow

Labile(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

6

Labile, stable or permanent tissues:Vaginal epithelium

Labile(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

7

Labile, stable or permanent tissues:Salivary glands

Labile(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

8

Labile, stable or permanent tissues:Liver parenchyma

Stable(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

9

Labile, stable or permanent tissues:Endothelium

Stable(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

10

Labile, stable or permanent tissues:Smooth muscle cells

Stable(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

11

Labile, stable or permanent tissues:Neurons

Permanent(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.62

12

Labile, stable or permanent tissues:Cardiac muscle

Permanent(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.62

13

Type of collagen found in basement membrane

Type IV collagen(TOPNOTCH)

14

Type of collagen found in basement membrane

Type IV collagen(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.67

15

This is the most abundant glycoprotein in basement membrane.

Laminin(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.68

16

The pink, soft, granular tissue seen beneath the scab of a skin wound.

Granulation tissue(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.70

17

Maturation and reorganization of fibrous tissue

Remodeling(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.70

18

Healing of a clean, uninfected surgical incision approximated by surgical sutures

Healing by first intention / Primary Union(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.74

19

Type of healing wherein tissue is allowed to heal by itself before suturing. Used in large wounds, in the presence of abscess, or ulceration.

Healing by secondary intention / secondary union(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.76

20

Wound strength reaches 70 - 80 % of normal in ______ months.

3 months(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.77

21

Single most important cause of delay in wound healing.

Infection(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.77

22

True or false: Complete restoration can occur only in tissues composed of stable and labile cells.

True(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.77

23

Refers to the restoration of tissue architecture and function after an injury.

Repair (TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.77

24

True or false:Injury to tissues composed of permanent cells does not result to scarring.

False. Injury to tissues composed of permanent cells, inevitably results to scarring.(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.77

25

Process of replacing damaged components of a tissue, returning to a normal state.

Regeneration (TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.77

26

Migration and proliferation of fibroblasts with deposition of ECM.

Scar formation(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.72

27

Maturation and reorganization of fibrous tissue

Remodeling(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.73

28

The pink, soft, granular tissue seen beneath the scab of a skin wound.

Granulation tissue(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.73

29

Arrange the steps in cutaneous wound healing:A. Formation of granulation tissueB. ECM remodelingC. Inflammation

C, A, B(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.72

30

It consists of a series of steps at which the cell checks for the accuracy of replication and mitosis and instructs itself to proceed to the next step.

Cell cycle(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

31

In the cell cycle, this is called the presynthetic growth phase.

G1(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

32

In the cell cycle, this is also called the premitotic growth phase.

G2(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

33

These steps in the cell cycle prevents DNA replication or mitosis of damaged cells and either transiently stop the cell cycle to allow repair, or eliminate irreversibly damaged cells by apoptosis.

Checkpoint control(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

34

These enzymes promote DNA replication and various aspects of mitosis. They are required for cell cycle progression. Forms complexes with cyclin.

Cyclin-deoendent kinases (CDK)(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.61

35

This cytokine is released from activated macrophages, and is mitogenic for keratinocytes and fibroblasts. It also stimulates keratinocyte migration and granulation tissue formation.

Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)(TOPNOTCH)

36

This cytokine increases vascular permeability and is mitogenic for endothelial cells.

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th ed. p.71

37

Pattern of extracellular signaling wherein the target cell is itself.

Autocrine(TOPNOTCH)

38

Pattern of extracellular signaling wherein the target cell is adjacent to the secretory cell.

Paracrine(TOPNOTCH)

39

Pattern of extracellular signaling wherein the target cell is distant to the secretory cell.

Endocrine(TOPNOTCH)

40

Synthesized by mesenchymal cells, present in the spaces between cells in connective tissue, between epithelium and supportive vascular and smooth muscle structures.

Interstitial Matrix(TOPNOTCH)

41

Component of ECM which confers tensile strength and recoil.

Fibrous proteins s.a. Collagen and elastin(TOPNOTCH)

42

Component of ECM that permits resilience and lubrication.

Proteoglycans, hyaluronan(TOPNOTCH)

43

Component of ECM that connect the elements to one another and to the cells.

Adhesive glycoproteins(TOPNOTCH)