Interregnum (1649-1660) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Interregnum (1649-1660) Deck (18):
1

Interregnum

1649 - 1660
Lord Cromwell takes over after execution of Charles I
Samuel Butler
Andrew Marvell
Robert Herrick
Anne Bradstreet

2

Samuel Butler

Interregnum

Not to be confused with Samuel Butler (1835-1902), writer of Way of All Flesh and Erewhon.

3

Hudibras

Samuel Butler
Interregnum

Similar to Don Quixote, tells story of knight, Hudibras, and servant Ralpho. They go out to stop sin. Satirizes Puritans in England and the conflict between Oliver Cromwell and Charles II. Written in “Hudibrastic” poetry—rhymed couplets of lines eight syllables long:
“We grant, although he had much wit/ He was very shy of using it/ As being loath to wear it out/ And therefore brought it not about”

4

Andrew Marvell

Interregnum

Tutored Oliver Cromwell’s nephew, befriended John Milton and actually became his assistant for some time, when Milton was blind.

5

“To His Coy Mistress”

Andrew Marvell
Interregnum

Almost every line is famous. “But at my back I always hear/ Time’s winged chariot hurrying near;/ And yonder all before us lie/ Deserts of vast eternity.”

6

“Upon Appleton House”

Andrew Marvell
Interregnum

supposedly his “most profound” poem

7

"The Definition of Love"

Andrew Marvell
Interregnum

8

"The Mower Against Gardens"

Andrew Marvell
Interregnum

And in the cherry he does nature vex, 30 To procreate without a sex. 31 'Tis all enforc'd, the fountain and the grot, 32 While the sweet fields do lie forgot; 33 Where willing nature does to all dispense 34 A wild and fragrant innocence; 35 And fauns and fairies do the meadows till, 36 More by their presence than their skill. 37 Their statues polish'd by some ancient hand, 38 May to adorn the gardens stand; 39 But howso'ere the figures do excel, 40 The gods themselves with us do dwell.

9

Robert Herrick

Interregnum

He was the oldest of the “Sons of Ben [Jonson],” a group of “Cavalier Poets” including others like John Suckling, Thomas Carew (writer of “on the death of the dean of st. Paul’s cathedral.” Known for the “Julie Poems,” poems about a supposedly invented mistress—the Julia poems were a first, inspiring others to write to imaginary mistresses, like Wordsworth to Lucy.

10

"Upon Julia's Breasts"

Robert Herrick
Interregnum

11

"Upon Julia's Clothes"

Robert Herrick
Interregnum

12

"The Night Peace, to Julia"

Robert Herrick
Interregnum

13

"Corina's Gone a-Maying"

Robert Herrick
Interregnum

I sing of brooks, of blossoms, birds, and bowers,
Of April, May, of June, and July flowers.
I sing of Maypoles, hock carts, wassails, wakes,
Of bridegrooms, brides, and of their bridal cakes.
I write of youth, of love, and have access
By these to sing of cleanly wantonness.
I sing of dews, of rains, and, piece by piece,
Of balm, of oil, of spice, and ambergris.
I sing of times trans-shifting, and I write
How roses first came red and lilies white.
I write of groves, of twilights, and I sing
The court of Mab and of the fairy king.
I write of hell; I sing (and ever shall)
Of heaven, and hope to have it after all.

14

Anne Bradstreet

Known as the first American poet. A Puritan in New England. Wrote a lot while her husband was off on political trips

During Interregnum era in England

15

"The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung Up in America, By a Gentlewoman of Those Parts"

Anne Bradstreet
Early American (Interregnum era)

first book of poems written in English in America. Doesn’t contain her best work.

16

“An Author to Her Book”

Anne Bradstreet
Early American (Interregnum era)

Bradstreet sending her book off to make her some money, despite the defects: “Thou ill-formed offspring of my feeble brain,
Who after birth did'st by my side remain” "If what I do prove well, it won't advance.
They'll say it's stolen, or else it was by chance. "

17

“To My Dear and Loving Husband”

Anne Bradstreet
Early American (Interregnum era)

About her husband: “If ever two were one, then surely we.
If ever man were lov'd by wife, then thee.”

18

“In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Elizabeth Bradstreet”

Anne Bradstreet
Early American (Interregnum era)

Farewell dear babe, my heart's too much content,
Farewell sweet babe, the pleasure of mine eye,
Farewell fair flower that for a space was lent,
Then ta'en away unto eternity.
Blest babe, why should I once bewail thy fate,
Or sigh thy days so soon were terminate,
Sith thou art settled in an everlasting state.

By nature trees do rot when they are grown,
And plums and apples thoroughly ripe do fall,
And corn and grass are in their season mown,
And time brings down what is both strong and tall.
But plants new set to be eradicate,
And buds new blown to have so short a date,
Is by His hand alone that guides nature and fate.