Intro to CNS infection - A. Prunuske Flashcards Preview

Neuro - Block 2 > Intro to CNS infection - A. Prunuske > Flashcards

Flashcards in Intro to CNS infection - A. Prunuske Deck (13):
1

Where do CNS infections occur???

Meningitis
Encephalitis
Abscess
Myelitis

Meningitis (subarachnoid space)
Encephalitis (diffuse parenchyma)
Abscess (focal parenchyma)
Myelitis (spinal cord)

2

What type of virus is associated with the late summer to early fall?

Enterovirus

3

Why would geography play a role when you are diagnosing a CNS infection?

Tick exposure, west nile virus, etc.

4

What is best treatment for CNS infection?

Bactericidal, small, lipophilic, low affinity for plasma binding proteins, and not a ligand of the efflux pumps at the blood brain barrier.

5

Aminoglycosides have a risk for what serious side effect?

ototoxicity

6

Beta-lactam drugs have potential for what important side effect?

Inhibition of GABA-A release
Leads to higher risk of seizures

Watch out for renal problems

7

Potential side effects with macrolides?

Ototoxicity!

8

If you look at the CT or MRI and see a focal mass lesion, why should you NOT do a lumbar puncture?

Increased risk of brain herniation

9

Difference between fungal and bacterial meningitis?

Hgher pressure in bacterial meningitis

Both cases have elevated white count, but in bacterial you wil have polymorphonulear leukocytes (neutrophils, basophils, eosinophils)

Fungal case - higher levels of lymphocytes

Bacterial also has decreased levels of glucose because the bacteria is eating it up as well

10

Big 3 symptoms for a CNS infection?

Fever, headache, altered mental state

11

What is the difference between an encephalopathy vs encephalitis?

Encephalopathy refers to diffuse cerebral dysfunction without inflammation usually due to toxin or metabolic dysfunction

Ecephalitis is caused by an infective agent

12

I want you to think REAL hard.
Do you remember what virus can use retrograde axonal transport in the CNS to get where it wants to go?

Rabies!

13

What are ToRCH infections? Why are they important to you as a future clinician?

TORCH infections are a group of congenitally acquired infections that cause significant morbidity and mortality in neonates. Acquired by the mother and passed either transplacentally or during the birth process.

T-oxoplasmosis
O-ther (Syphilis, HIV, VZV, parvovirus B19, enteroviruses)
R-ubella
C-MV (Cytomegalovirus)
H-SV (Herpes)