KNO 001 Knots Flashcards Preview

Fire Fighter Development > KNO 001 Knots > Flashcards

Flashcards in KNO 001 Knots Deck (20)
Loading flashcards...
1

In Use, a line is always secure to:

An Object.
Another Line.
Part of Itself.

2

The qualities of a good knot are the it should:

Be easy to tie.
Be easy to untie.
Not damage the line.
Carry out the function for which it is being employed, safetly and without slipping.

3

The 4 parts of the line are called:

Standing Part.
Bight.
Tail.
Running End.

4

Standing Part

Part of the line around which the running end passes to form the knot, and generally that part which takes the strain to be applied.

5

Bight

A section of the line formed by bringing the running end round parallel with, or crossing the standing part.

6

Tail

Part of the line from the RUNNING END that is left outside the knot.

7

Running End

Part of the line which is used to form the knot by movement around the STANDING PART.

8

Half Hitch

Formed either on a spar or object by passing the RUNNING END over, and crossing it over the STANDING PART, locking it.

9

Round Turn

Formed by passing a line over a spar or a object completely once.

10

Round Turn and Two Half Hitches

A round turn and two half hitches can be used to attach a line to any round object such as a spar or a ring.

It is achieved by taking a round turn over the object and making two half hitches on the STANDING PART. (These form a clove hitch).

11

Overhang Knot

The knot, also know as the 'Thumb Knot' is mainly used to prevent a line unreeving through a block. In the Fire Service, this knot is tied in a burst or damaged length of hose to identify it while it is still laid out.

The over hand knot is formed by laying the RUNNING END over the STANDING PART and bringing it under and up through the BIGHT.

12

Figure of Eight Knot

The figure of eight knot is an alternative to the overhand knot.

It is made by laying the RUNNING END of the line over the STANDING PART and then bringing the end round underneath the STANDING PART and down through the BIGHT.

13

Fisherman's Knot

The fisherman's knot is used for tying two lines of equal thickness.

It is tied by laying the two lines parallel to each other. Then, taking one end, tie an overhand knot around the other line and once this is completed take the second free end and tie an overhand knot around the first line.

The two knots formed can now be pulled tight and pulled together.

14

Double Sheet Bend

This knot is used to join two lines of in equal thickness.

The double sheet bend is formed by making a bight with the thicker line and passing the light line up through the bight and around the back. This light line is then passed under its own STANDING PART.

It's the continues on around for another turn, passing under its own STANDING PART a second time. It is essential that the STANDING PART locks against both the turns.

15

Clove Hitch

A clove hitch consists basically of two half hitches, one of which is reversed.

It is used to secure a line to a round object, and pull at right angles.

Firefighters should be able to tie this knot both by using the running end and in the middle of the line.

16

Rolling Hitch

The rolling hitch is a variant of the clove hitch and is commenced and finished in the same manner, but an intermediate round turn is made between the two half hitches. This intermediate round turn passes over the STANDING PART.

It has the advantage that it will not slip in the direction in which the double turn is applied when subjected to a sideways pull. When tying a rolling hitch it must be constructed for the specific strain which it is to resist.

17

Bow Line

The Main use for a bowline is in circumstances where a non-slipping noose is required.

Make a half hitch in the STANDING PART, then pass the RUNNING END up through the BIGHT. The RUNNING END is then passed around the back of the STANDING PART and down through the half hitch. The knot is then drawn tight.

18

Running Bowline

The running bowline is used where a slipping noose is required. It can be put on a belt, ring, spar or other object. But under no circumstances should it be place around a person's body.

To form a running bowline, the line should be passed round the object to be hauled, ensuring that the RUNNING END passes around the main STANDING PART. The bowline section is now formed in the normal way.

19

Key Learning Points

A line is always secured to an object, another line or part of Itself.
Running end, standing part, bight and tail describe the different parts of the lines.

Round turn and two half hitches are use to attach a line to any round object such as a spar or ring.

Overhand knot is mainly used to prevent a line unreeving through a block.

Figure of eight knot is an alternative to the overhand knot used as a stopping knot.

Fisherman's Knot is used for tying two lines of equal thickness.

Double Sheet Bend is used to join two lines of unequal thickness.

Clove Hitch is used to secure a line to a round object, and pull at right angles.

Rolling Hitch does not slip in the direction in which the double turn is applied when subjected to side ways pull.

Bowline is used where a non-slipping noose is required.

Running bowline is used where a slipping noose is required.

20

What are the 11 general knots used in the Brigade:

Half Hitch
Round Turn
Round Turn and Two Half Hitches
Overhand
Figure of Eight
Fisherman's Knot
Double Sheet Bend
Clove Hitch
Rolling Hitch
Bowline
Running Bowline