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Flashcards in Land - Leases Deck (44)
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Street v Mountford

Importance of exclusive possession in a lease. (domestic) Looking at substance (not form) of agreement. Intention of parties irrelevant.

1

NCP v Trinity

Car park - importance of exclusive possession in a lease (commercial) Substa ce of agreement not form

2

Prudential Assurance

In order to be a lease needs to be for a fixed period However, entering into possession and paying a fixed rent created a periodic tenancy. Affirmed in Berrisford - could not give rise to a tenancy if max duration is uncertain at inception.

3

Fitzkriston LLP

Best rent reasonably available means market rent.

4

Crago v Julian

In order for a lease to be legal (as opposed to equitable), the assignment must be by deed.

5

Walsh v Lonsdale

An equitable lease exists if - certain agreement to grant a legal lease. - contract complies with s2 LP(MP)A 1989 - equity could grant specific performance - equity treats parties as if a legal lease had been granted - distress appropriate and lawful.

6

Coatsworth v Johnson

Specific performance is discretionary. - delay - undue hardship - unclean hands disuades.

7

Moule v Garrett

Pre 1996 If the original tenant is sued for breach of real covenant, he can claim directly from the assignee in whom lease was vested at time of breach (regardless of if there is an intermediate assignee)

8

P&A Swift Investments

Test for real covenants that "touch and concern" the land. 1) must benefit only reversioner (cannot be separate from the reversion) 2) must affect nature, quality, mode of user or value of the land 3) must not be personal.

9

Stewart v Scottish Widows

Speed humps (low car garage drive) Implied covenant not to derogate from the grant (not to do anything to make premises unfit for the purpose for which they were let.

10

International Drilling Fluids v Louisville Investment

1) qualified covenants to protect landlord 2) landlord not entitled to refuse consent on grounds that have nothing to do with L-T relationship 3) no need to justify reasons of withheld consent if objectively reasonable 4) may be reasonable to refuse on grounds of purpose intended to be used for 5) disproportional benefit to landlord and detriment to tenant if refused would be unreasonable 6) question of fact - reasonableness is a burden of proof on landlord

11

Ashworth Frazer

To decide if unreasonable to withhold consent 1) cannot if grounds separate from L- T relationship 2) question of fact "objective reasonableness" 3) landlord required to show he was reasonable not right or justifiable. Affirmed international Drilling Fluids

12

Woolgar

Waived breach if unequivocal act done by landlord which recognises existence of lease after having knowledge of the ground for fortfeiture. State of mind irrelevant.

13

Thatcher v Pearce

Relief can be granted up to 6 months after landlord's actual re-entry to property under a court order (domestic) (commercial leases - no time limit) General equitable jurisdiction. Therefore unsafe to relet!

14

Expert Clothing Service v Hillgate House

A breach is capable of remedy where harm done is capable of being retrieved by making good the breach, compensation or both. Reasonable time must be given to comply. Not possible to have forfeiture or serve s146 notice under this. .

15

Rugby School v Tannahill

Stigma Cases incapable of remedy - Landlord does not need to give a reasonable time or serve s146 notice

16

Southwark LBC v Tanner

Covenant is that tenat's enjoyment will not be disturbed by acts after tenancy has begun (eg lack of soundproofing before would not count). Quiet means uninterrupted NOT noiseless

17

Sanderson v Berwick-upon-Tweed

Landlord not liable for actions committed by persons deriving their title from him unless they are acting within their legal rights

18

Jones v Lavington

Landlord not responsible for breaches by a person holding a superior title.

19

Tulk v Moxhay

.

20

Dong Bang Minerva

Reasonable time to respond to landlord refusal for consent to reassign is 28 days. Helps tenant establish case and increases damages if proved unreasonably withheld.

21

Rawlings v Rawlings

Order for sale may be delayed until children grown up

22
1

Importance of exclusive possession in a lease. (domestic) Looking at substance (not form) of agreement. Intention of parties irrelevant.

Street v Mountford

23
1

Car park - importance of exclusive possession in a lease (commercial) Substa ce of agreement not form

NCP v Trinity

24
1

In order to be a lease needs to be for a fixed period However, entering into possession and paying a fixed rent created a periodic tenancy. Affirmed in Berrisford - could not give rise to a tenancy if max duration is uncertain at inception.

Prudential Assurance

25
1

Best rent reasonably available means market rent.

Fitzkriston LLP

26
1

In order for a lease to be legal (as opposed to equitable), the assignment must be by deed.

Crago v Julian

27
1

An equitable lease exists if - certain agreement to grant a legal lease. - contract complies with s2 LP(MP)A 1989 - equity could grant specific performance - equity treats parties as if a legal lease had been granted - distress appropriate and lawful.

Walsh v Lonsdale

28
1

Specific performance is discretionary. - delay - undue hardship - unclean hands disuades.

Coatsworth v Johnson

29
1

Pre 1996 If the original tenant is sued for breach of real covenant, he can claim directly from the assignee in whom lease was vested at time of breach (regardless of if there is an intermediate assignee)

Moule v Garrett