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Flashcards in Lymph system Deck (47)
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1

What are the two semi-independant parts of the lymphatic system

Lymphatic Vessels
various lymphoid tisssues & organs

2

What kind of pressures move fluid from the capillary beds

Hydrostatic and Osmotic

3

What is it called when there is fluid buildup

Edema

4

What are lymph vessels lined with

Endothelial cells, thin layer of smooth muscles and adventitia (outermost connective tissue covering of an organ,vessel or other structure)

5

How does fluid enter the lymph vessels

Gaps in the side that open one way. Can come in but can't leave through those openings.

6

True or False: Bacteria and viruses can enter blood capillaries, not lymph vessels

False

7

Where is the lymph returned to the blood and which side drains what

Right lymph duct drains right head and chest.
Left (large duct) drains the rest of the body
Front limb drains into axillary, Pelvic into iliosacral lymph center
Drains into the subclavian.

8

Name the 3 ways lymph is moved

Skeletal pumping (moving, walking), breathing, and smooth muscles.

9

What makes up 40% of the equine lymphatic system

Elastin

10

Is there lymph fluid in the hoof and lower leg with the lack of muscle there

Yes

11

What is the hoof pump

Hoof pump fills and empties the lymphatic vessels through contact with the ground and suspension of the moving foot

12

Where does the lymph from the hoof and leg drain

The deep collector system/ deep collector vessels

13

Where does lymph travel

Towards the heart

14

What is located in the lymph system cleaning the fluid

Macrophages and Lymphocytes

15

Where do the lymphocytes come from

Red bone marrow

16

Explain lymph traveling through a node

The lymph enters the convex side of the node through the afferent vessels and leaves through the hilus vs efferent vessels. There are move afferent vessels then efferent so the lymph leaving takes longer so that it can being fully cleaned.

17

Name 5 lymphoid organs

Tonsils- first line of defense from air borne pathogen. 3 types are palatine, pharyngeal and lingual
Thymus- primary lymphatic organ. Where t-cells mature
Spleen-cleans and destroys red blood cells as well is a blood resevoir
Peyers Patch- located in small intestine. Primary lymphatic tissue. In where most waste & bacteria can manifest
Bone marrow- location of lymphocyte production & B-cell maturation

18

Name the epithieum cells on the Palatine , Pharayngeal & Lingual Tonsils

Stratified squamous, pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithilium & stratified squamous epithilium.

19

What is the primary lymphatic organ

Thymus

20

What is different about the spleen

Filters blood, destroys worn out blood cells, stores platelets and acts as a blood resevoir

21

Where is the spleen located

Left side of body

22

Where is the peyers patch located

Small intestine

23

What does MALT and GALT stand for

mucosal-associated and gut-associated lymphoid tissue

24

What is the primary lymphoid tissue

Peyers Patch

25

Differentiate lymphocytes and where they mature.

T-lymphocites and B-lymphocites.
Both come from bone marrow but T-cells mature in thymus and B-cells mature in Bone marrow

26

What is the function of the lymphatic vessels

Picks up fluid and proteins that are leaked from the blood into interstitial space

27

How do lymphatic capillaries and blood capillaries differ structurally from each other

Lymphatic capillaries are blind ended and not fed by arteries like blood capillaries are. Lymphatic have minivalves that make them more permeable than blood capillaries.

28

What is the benefit of having fewer efferent than afferent lymphatic vessels.

slows down the lymph in the node almost to a stop, giving time to macrophages and lymphocytes to more closely monitor the lymph.

29

In which three regions of the body are the lymph nodes most dense

axillary, inguinal and cervical

30

How do innate and adaptive defenses differ

innate is always ready to protect and is non-specific (skin, mucous, phagocytes, inflammatory response...). adaptive is specific to the antigen (Lymphocytes, antibodies, antigen presenting cells)