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Flashcards in Midterm Deck (77):
1

“Another requisition was presented, who would be capable to secure the woman from the terrors of the great water, but none was able to comply except a large turtle came forward and made proposal to the to endure her lasting weight, which was accepted.”

“The Iroquois Creation Story”:

2

“The good mind was not contented to remain in a dark situation, and he was anxious to create a great light in the dark world; but the bad mind was desirous that the world should remain in a natural state.”

“The Iroquois Creation Story”:

3

“In it there are many harbors on the coast of the sea, beyond comparison with others which I know in Christendom, and many rivers, good and large, which is marvelous.”

“Letter to Santangel Regarding the First Voyage”: Columbus

4

“All are most beautiful, of a thousand shapes, and all are accessible and filled with trees of a thousand kinds and tall, and they seem to touch the sky.

“Letter to Santangel Regarding the First Voyage”: Columbus

5

I bartered with these Indians in combs I made for them and in bows, arrows, and nets.

“The Relation of Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca”: Cabeza de Vaca

6

We had come from the sunrise, they from the sunset; we healed the sick, they killed the sound; we came naked and barefoot, they clothed, horsed, and lanced; we coveted nothing but gave whatever we were given, while they robbed whomever they found and bestowed nothing on anyone.

“The Relation of Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca”: Cabeza de Vaca

7

“If a man work but three days in seven he may get more than he can spend, unless he will be excessive.”

“A Description of New England”: Smith

8

“The master by this may quickly grow rich; these may learn their trades themselves, to do the like; to a general and an incredible benefit, for king, and country, master, and servant.”

“A Description of New England”: Smith

9

“Being thus arrived in a good harbor and brought safe to land, the fell upon their knees and blessed the God of heaven,, who had brought them over the vast and furious ocean, and delivered them from all their perils and miseries thereof, again to set their feet on the firm and stable earth.”

“Of Plymouth Plantation”: Bradford

10

“He directed them how to set their corn, where to take the fish , and to procure other commodities, and was also their pilot to bring them to unknown places for their profit and never left them till he died.”

“Of Plymouth Plantation”: Bradford

11

“By the first of these laws man as he was enabled so withal [is] commanded to love his neighbor as himself.”

“A Model of Christian Charity”: Winthrop

12

“Lastly, when there is no other means whereby our Christian brother may be relieved in his distress, we must help him beyond our ability, rather that tempt God in putting him upon help by miraculous or extraordinary means.”

“A Model of Christian Charity”: Winthrop

13

“For we must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill. The eyes of the people are upon us , so that if we shall deal falsely with our God in this work we have undertaken, and so cause Him to withdraw His present help from us, we shall be made a story and a by-word through the world.”

“A Model of Christian Charity”: Winthrop

14

“Then coming out, beheld a space
The flame consume my dwelling place.
And when I could no longer look,
I blest His name that gave and took,
That laid my goods now in the dust.”

“Here Follows Some Verses Upon the Burning of Our House”: Bradstreet

15

“Under thy roof no guest shall sit,
Not at thy table eat a bit.”

“Here Follows Some Verses Upon the Burning of Our House”: Bradstreet

16

“There were five persons taken in one house; the father, and the mother and a sucking child, they knocked on the head; the other two they took and carried away alive.”

“From a Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson”: Rowlandson

17

“One of my elder sister’s children, named William had then his leg broken, which the Indians perceiving, they knocked him on [his] head.”

“From a Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson”: Rowlandson

18

“They would eat horse's guts, and ears, and all sorts of wild birds which they could catch, also bear, venison, beaver, tortoise, frogs, squirrels, dogs, skunks, rattlesnakes, yea, the very bark of trees; besides all sorts of creatures, and provision which they plundered from the English.”

“From a Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson”: Rowlandson

19

“Make me, O Lord, Thy Spinning Wheel complete,
Thy Holy Word my Distaff make for me.”

“Huswifery”: Taylor

20

Then clothe therewith mine Understanding, Will,
Affections, Judgment, Conscience, Memory,
My Words, and Actions, that their shine may fill
My ways with glory and Thee glorify.”

“Huswifery”: Taylor

21

“If the devils now can strike the minds of men with any poisons of so fine a composition and operation, that scores of innocent people shall unite, in confessions of a crime, which we see actually committed, it is a thing prodigious, beyond the wonders of the former ages, and it threatens no less than a sort of a solution upon the world.”

“From the Wonders of the Invisible World”: Mather

22

“VIII. One Foster, who confessed her own share in the witchcraft for which the prisoner stood indicted, affirmed that she had seen the prisoner at some of their witch-meetings, and that it was this Carrier, who persuaded her to be a witch.”

“From the Wonders of the Invisible World”: Mather

23

“It shook with his measured breath as he gave out the psalm; it threw its obscurity between him and the holy page, as he read the Scriptures; and while he prayed, the veil lay heavily on his uplifted countenance. Did he seek to hide it from the dread Being whom he was addressing?”

“The Minister’s Black Veil”: Hawthorne

24

“The subject had reference to secret sin, and those sad mysteries which we hide from our nearest and dearest, and would fain conceal from our own consciousness, even forgetting that the Omniscient can detect the.”

“The Minister’s Black Veil”: Hawthorne

25

“What, but the mystery which it obscurely typifies, has made this piece of crape so awful? When the friend shows his inmost heart to his friend; the lover to his best-beloved; when man does not vainly shrink from the eye of his Creator, loathsomely treasuring up the secret of his sin; then deem me a monster, for the symbol beneath which I have lived, and die! I look around me, and lo! On every visage a black veil!

“The Minister’s Black Veil”: Hawthorne

26

“That the reason why they are not fallen already, and do not fall now, is only that God's appointed time is not come. For it is said that when that due time, or appointed times comes, their foot shall slide.”

“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”: Edwards

27

“Your wickedness makes you as it were heavy as lead, and to tend downwards with great weight and pressure towards hell; and if God should let you go, you would immediately sink and swiftly descend and plunge into the bottomless gulf, and your healthy constitution, and your own care and prudence, and best contrivance, and all your righteousness, would have no more influence to uphold you and keep you out of hell, than a spider's web would have to stop a fallen rock.”

“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”: Edwards

28

“Indians were hired to fight against Indians, and many of our people were destroyed. They also brought strong liquor amongst us. It was strong and powerful, and has slain thousands.”

“Reply to the Missionary Jacob Cram”: Jacket

29

“We understand that your religion is written in a book. If it was intended for us as well as you, why has not the Great Spirit given to us, and not only to us, but why did he not give to our forefathers, the knowledge of that book, with the means of understanding it rightly?”

“Reply to the Missionary Jacob Cram”: Jacket

30

“Brothers - The white men want more than our hunting grounds; they wish to kill our warriors; they would even kill our old men, women , and little ones.”

“Speech to the Osages”: Tecumseh

31

“Brothers - My people are brave and numerous; but the white people are too strong for them alone. I wish you to take up the tomahawk with them. If we all unite, we will cause the rivers to stain the great waters with their blood.”

“Speech to the Osages”: Tecumseh

32

“My intention being to acquire the Habitude of all these Virtues, I judg’d it would be well not to distract my Attention by attempting the whole at once, but to fix it on one of them at a time, and when I should Master of that, then to proceed to another, and so on till I should have gone thro’ the thirteen.”

“The Autobiography”: Franklin

33

“In reality there is perhaps no one of our natural Passions so hard to subdue as Pride. Disguise it, struggle with it, beat it down, stifle it, mortify it, as much as one pleases, it is still alive, and will every now and then peep out and show itself.”

“The Autobiography”: Franklin

34

“What then is the American, this new man? He is either a European, or the descendant of a European, hence that strange mixture of blood, which you will find in no other country.”

“Letters from an American Farmer”: Crevecoeur

35

“He is an American, who, leaving behind him all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the rank he holds.”

“Letters from an American Farmer”: Crevecoeur

36

“We hold these truths to be self evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with inherent and inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that to secure these rights, goverments are instituted among men…”

“The Declaration of Independence”: Jefferson

37

“He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither.”

“The Declaration of Independence”: Jefferson

38

“It has been frequently remarked that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend, for their political constitutions, on accident and force.”

“The Federalist Papers”: Hamilton & Madison

39

“The instability, injustice and confusion introduced into the public councils, have in truth been the mortal diseases under which popular governments have everywhere perished; as they continue to be the favorite and fruitful topics from which the adversaries to liberty derive their most specious declamations.”

“The Federalist Papers”: Hamilton & Madison

40

“One day, when all our people were gone out to their works as usual, and only I and my dear sister were left to mind the house, two men and a woman got over our walls, and in a moment seized us both, and without giving us time to cry out, or make resistance, they stopped our mouths, and ran off with us into the nearest wood.”

“The Interesting Narrative of the Life of…”: Equiano

41

“I asked them if we were not to be eaten by those white men with horrible looks, red faces, and long hair. They told me I was not: and one of the crew brought me a small portion of spirituous liquor in a wine glass, but, being afraid of him, I would not take it out of his hand.”

“The Interesting Narrative of the Life of…”: Equiano

42

“Religion such as nature taught,
With all divine perfection suits;
Had all mankind this system sought
Sophists would cease their vain disputes.”

“On the Religion of Nature”: Freneau

43

“Joy to the day, when all agree
On such grand system to proceed.”

“On the Religion of Nature”: Freneau

44

“The great error in Rip’s composition was an insuperable aversion to all kinds of profitable labor. It could not be for the want of assiduity or perseverance; for he would sit on a wet rock, with a rod as long and heavy as Tartar's lance, and fish all day without a murmur, even though he should not be encouraged by a single nibble.”

“Rip Van WInkle”: Irving

45

“He had not entered the skirts of the village. A troop of strange children ran at his heels, hooting after him, and pointing at his gray beard. The dogs, too, not one of which he recognized for his old acquaintances barked at him as he passed.

“Rip Van WInkle”: Irving

46

“‘Let go my garment, fellow! I tell you. I know not the man you speak of. What! I have authority, I have-hem, hem-authority; and if this be the respect you show your betters, your feet shall be brought acquainted with the stocks, by daylight, tomorrow morning!

“My Kinsman, Major Molineux”: Hawthorne

47

“He now roamed desperately, and at random, through the town, almost ready to believe that a spell was on him, like that, by which a wizard of his country, had once kept three pursuers wandering, a whole winter night, within twenty paces of the cottage which they sought.”

“My Kinsman, Major Molineux”: Hawthorne

48

“Go forth under the open sky, and list (listen)
To Nature’s teaching, while from all around-
Earth and her waters, and the depths of the air,-
Comes a still voice-Yet a few days, and thee
The all be holding the sun shall see no more
In all his course; nor yet in the cold ground.”

“Thanatopsis”: Bryant

49

“All that breathe
Will share thy destiny. The gay will laugh
When thou art gone, the solemn brood of care
Plod on, and each one as before will chase
His favorite phantom; yet all these shall leave.”

“Thanatopsis”: Bryant

50

“...genius always look forward. The eyes of man are set in his forehead, not in his hindhead. Man hopes. Genius creates. To create,-to create,- is the proof of a divine presence.”

“The American Scholar”: Emerson

51

“We will walk on our own feet; we will work with our own hands; we will speak our own minds.”

“The American Scholar”: Emerson

52

“I remember the black wharves and the slips,
And the sea-tides tossing free.”

“My Lost Youth”: Longfellow

53

“A boy’s will is the wind’s will,
And the thoughts of youth are long, long, thoughts.”

“My Lost Youth”: Longfellow

54

“How strange it seems, with so much gone
Of life and love, to still live on!
Ah! brother! only I and thou
Are left of all that circle now.”

“Snow-Bound: A Winter Idyll”: Whittier

55

“But sleep stole on, as sleep will do
When hearts are light and life is new;
Faint and more faint the murmurs grew.”

“Snow-Bound: A Winter Idyll”: Whittier

56

“Every morning was a cheerful invitation to make my life of equal simplicity, and I may say innocence, with Nature herself. I have been as sincere a worshipper of Aurora as the Greeks. I got up early and bathed in the pond; that was a religious exercise, and one of the best things which I did.”

“Walden (Where I lived, and What I Lived For)”: Thoreau

57

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”

“Walden (Where I lived, and What I Lived For)”: Thoreau

58

“Or I guess the grass is itself a child, the produced babe of vegetation.”

“Song of Myself”: Whitman

59

“Unscrew the locks from the doors!
Unscrew the doors themselves from their jambs!”

“Song of Myself”: Whitman

60

“Danger is nothing to me; for life-while this hateful mark makes me the object of your horror and disgust-life is a burthen which I would fling down with joy. Eather remove this dreadful Hand, or take my wretched life!”

“The Birth-Mark”: Hawthorne

61

“Believe me, Georgiana, I even rejoice in this single imperfection, since it will be such rapture to remove it.”

“The Birth-Mark”: Hawthorne

62

“The room in which I found myself was very large and excessively lofty. The windows were long, narrow, and pointed, and at so vast a distance from the black oaken floor as to be altogether inaccessible from within.”

“The Fall of the House of Usher”: Poe

63

“I endeavored to believe that much, if not all of what I felt was due to the phantasmagoric influence of the gloomy furniture of the room.”

“The Fall of the House of Usher”: Poe

64

“It appeared to me that, from some very remote portion of the mansion or of its vicinity, there came, indistinctly, to my ears, what might have been, in its exact similarity of character the echo (but a stifled and dull one certainly) of the very cracking and ripping sound which Sir Launcelot had so particularly described.”

The Fall of the House of Usher”: Poe

65

“Male and female represent the two sides of the great radical dualism. But, in fact, they are perpetually passing into one another. Fluid hardens to solid, solid rushes to the fluid. There is no wholly masculine man, no purely feminine woman.”

“The Great Lawsuit”: Fuller

66

“Man partakes of the feminine in the Apollo, woman of the Masculine as Minerva.”

“The Great Lawsuit”: Fuller

67

“In consequence of all the various delays, it was about three-quarters of an hour after Eliza had laid her child to sleep in the village tavern that the party came riding into the same place.”

“Uncle Tom’s Cabin (The Mother’s Struggle)”: Stowe

68

“Eliza recognized the voice and face of a man who owned a farm not far from her old home. ‘O, Mr. Symmes!-save me-do save me-do hide me!’ said Eliza.”

“Uncle Tom’s Cabin (The Mother’s Struggle)”: Stowe

69

“We often planned together how we could get to the north. But, as William remarked, such things are easier said than done. My movements were very closely watched, and we had no means of getting any money to defray our expenses.”

“Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl”: Jacobs

70

“He cut every hair close to my head, storming and swearing all the time. I replied to some of his abuse, and he struck me. Some months before, he had pitched me down stairs in a fit of passion; and the injury I received was so serious that I was unable to turn myself in bed for many days.”

“Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl”: Jacobs

71

“A want of information concerning my own source of unhappiness to me even during childhood. The white children could tell their ages. I could not tell why I ought to be deprived of the same privilege. I was not allowed to make many inquiries of my master concerning it.”

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave…” Douglass

72

“I have been frequently asked, when a slave, if I had a kind master, and do not remember ever to have given a negative answer; nor did I, in pursuing this course, consider myself as uttering what was absolutely false; for I always measured the kindness of my master by the standard of kindness set up among slaveholders around us.”

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave…” Douglass

73

“‘I would prefer not to.’
‘You will not?’
I prefer not.’”

“Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall-Street”: Melville

74

“Quite surprised, I called out; when to my consternation a key was turned from within; and thrusting his lean visage at me, and holding the door ajar, the apparition of Bartleby appeared, in his shirt sleeves, and otherwise in a strangely tattered dishabille, saying quietly that he was sorry, but he was deeply engaged just then, and preferred not admitting me at present.”

“Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall-Street”: Melville

75

“Much Madness is divinest Sense -
To a discerning eye.”

“Much Madness is Divinest Sense”: Dickinson

76

“'Tis the majority
In this, as all prevail”

“Much Madness is Divinest Sense”: Dickinson

77

“Assent - and you are sane -
Demur - you’re straightway dangerous -
And handled with a Chain.”

“Much Madness is Divinest Sense”: Dickinson