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Flashcards in Module 2 Deck (113):
1

What is a determinant?

Any event or characteristic that influences health outcomes

2

What is socioeconomic position?

The impact of social and economic factors on the individual or group's standing in social structure

3

What categories does a measure of SEP have to fit?

It must be objective, meaningful and measurable

4

What are examples of SEP factors?

Income, education, occupation, housing, culture, services nearby, social capital. NEET

5

What do SEP factors do?

They: Quantify inequality levels within and between societies
Highlight changes to society
Highlight relationships between health and other factors

6

What needs to be remembered when measuring income?

Personal income
Use absolute (reporting bias) or categorial measures

Household income
Equivalised, standardisation

7

How does income help measure health status?

Dose-response association with health
Cumulative effect
Can change over a short duration e.g. short term contracts

Has the greatest potential for change. Therefore it's a great measure of socioeconomic position

8

How do we measure education levels?

It can be continuous variable (years in education)

Categorical variable (highest qualification).

Parents to person SEP comparisons
Cohort effects problems e.g. more people now study, women study, different countries have different education standards

9

How does education help measure health?

It corresponds with the person's ability to respond to health messages and is easy to access.

10

How do we measure occupation?

Current or longest held job. It is transferable to the dependents of a head of household.

NZSEI groups jobs by potential income i.e. social class

11

How does occupation help measure health?

It's closely related with income and reflects social standing, social mobility and affects stress levels and workplace hazards.

12

What is an odds ratio?


Yes / No for each group in the gate frame: (a/c) / (b/d).

13

What is health inequality?

Differences in health experience and outcomes of different populations due to factors such as SEP, gender etc (the social gradient).

14

What is health inequity?

Inequalities coming from injustices. It involves the distribution of resources being unreflective of health needs. It gives different groups unequal power.

15

What are the four reasons for reducing inequality?(Woodward and Kawachi)

1. They are unfair
2. They affect everyone
3. Their reduction could be cost effective
4. They are avoidable

16

What is social mobility?

People's ability to move between social strata in a society. It can be intra or inter generational

17

What is equity of opportunity?

Everybody having the same chance of moving up the social ladder

18

How do you draw a lorenz curve?

Draw a 45 degree line on the axes and plot he cumulative share of wealth by share of population

19

What is the gini coefficient and how does it work?

It is the ratio between the observed vs. ideal equality. It is A/(A+B) where A = the area between the line and drawn curve, while B = the area under the drawn curve. A coefficient = 0 is perfectly equal, while 1 is perfectly unequal.

20

What are the three ways life evens can interact to affect our long term health and well-being?

1. Cumulative (poverty trap)
2. Multiplicative (IHD risk factors)
3. Programming (foetal stimuli affecting later life)

21

What is the difference between population health and individual determinants?

Population determinants also involve the societal context

22

What are downstream interventions?

They operate at the micro level, such as treatment of patients and management of individuals.

23

What are upstream interventions?

They operate at the macro level: policies and international trade agreements

24

What are the 5 areas of the Dahlgren and Whitehead model?

Age, sex and genes
Individual and lifestyle factors
Social and Community factors
Living/Working Conditions
Socioeconomic, global and cultural factors

25

What are the subgroups of living/working conditions in the dahlgren & whitehead model?

Agriculture &amp food, Education, Work, Development, Sanitation, Healthcare, Housing

26

What are the three levels in the Dahlgren and Whitehead model?

The individual (genetics and lifestyle)
The Community (social and community factors, living/working)
The environment (cultural, global, socioeconomic)

27

What is a habitus?

An individual's lifestyle, values, disposition and expectations

28


What is social capital?

Social networks between individuals which provide an inclusive environment

29


What is structure?

The social and physical environmental conditions and patterns influencing peoples' choices and opportunities. (Operates in areas 3-5 of D-W model)

30

What is agency?

The ability of individuals to make free choices (L2-3 of D-W model).

31

How is maori health exemplified in NZ?

Many disparities in almost all areas of health.

32

What are the two types of intervention?

Structural (providing resources or services)
Social (changing ways of thinking and behavior)

33

How are ethnic disparities determined?

Differential access to health determinants and exposure, leading to differences in incidence
Differential access to care
Differences in care quality

34

What do minority groups tend to report of health care?

Less: feeling listened to
time with the provider
adequate explanations
More: Unanswered questions
dissatisfaction

35

What are the two ways in which minorities are disadvantaged?

Structurally (wealth and power distribution)
Socially (peoples' expectations)

36

What was a result of the ToW?

-Land alienation -> disruption, power and alliance shifts, resource depletion, resentment
- Policy alienation
- Inferior Citizenship: Entrenched poverty and dependency, barriers to development, acceptance of inequality, resentment, and social breakdown (crime).

37

What does neighbourhood deprivation measure?

The relative position of a neighbourhood in society. It focuses on what a neighbourhood doesn't have.

38

What are variables of deprivation?

Communication, income, employment, qualification, home ownership, support, space and transport.

39

What is NZDep used for and how should its conclusions be phrased?

Planning and allocation, research and advocacy. Should be "people in the most deprived neighbourhoods" NOT "the most deprived people".

40

Where do upstream vs. downstream interventions sit on the Dahlgren and Whitehead model?

Upstream interventions tend to belong on the outermost arch of the DW model- the social, political and physical environment. Downstream tend to target the individual or lifestyle. However, interventions can take place at any level.

41


What are the different measures of inequities?

Relative (no units):
- Relative risk (EGO/CGO)
- External quotient (highest value/lowest value)
Absolute (Units)
- Absolute risk (EGO-CGO)
- Range (Highest value- lowest value)

42

What are the external quotient and range used for?

Measuring the extent of a difference between different populations

43

What is the difference between guidelines and treatment?

Guidelines are more population health- they are upstream interventions.
Treatment is more clinical- they are downstream interventions.

44

Where do the 5 A's fit in the DW model?

They are in the community section (L3)

45

What is the inverse care law?

The availability of good medical care tends to vary inversely with the needs of the population served."

46

What needs to be considered when looking at who uses treatments?

What should the intervention statistics look like, considering who is most at risk for a dis-ease?

47

What can we use as denominators?

Census
HSU (health service utilisation and outcome)
IDI (integrated data infrastructure)

48

What is census?

Everyone who answered the cenus (NZ residents)

49

What is HSU?

Health Services Utilisation, only recorded the people who are using health services in the last 12 months

People who are no sick will not be in it

50

What is IDI?

Integrated data infrastructure:

Large research database containing microdata about people and households. Used to improve the outcomes for NZers'

51

What do we need to consider while using data?

Where we pick participants

Population sample vs the Population

e.g. excluding the people who did not get sick and not use healthcare services

52

What are variables?

Exposure factors

53

What is population structure?

The factors which build your population like sex, age

54

What are some events which determine population structure?

1. Trends of fertility (there is time lag cos it takes a long time until you become adult)

2. Migration (like Chch residents moving to Auck because of the earthquake)

3. Mortality events (death, age, sex)

55

Who are affected in fertility trends?

Females normally aged 20-30 yo, young adults

56

Who are affected in the mortality events?

Old people and the very young children

57

Who are the affected in migration?

varies with sex and stage in life cycle

58

Describe the features of the population pyramid graph

X axis is GENDER
- males on left, females on right

Y axis is AGe
- grouped in 5 year bands
- young to old, bottom to top

Bars wither are % of people in each age-sex group

59

Why is age and sex structure crucial?

Because it is a crucial influence on the rates at which these events occur in the population

e.g. area/country with very youthful population like likely to have less deaths than a elderly population of the same size but may have more fertile and more migrants

60

What are the key measure of fertility?

1. Crude birth rate
2. General fertility rate
3. Age specific fertility rate
4. Total fertility rate

61

What is crude birth rate?

No. birth/no of total population per 1000

62

What is general fertility rate?

an improvement of the CBR

63

What is age specific birth rate?

No. births to mothers in 5 year age band / no. females in 5 year age band

64

What is total fertility rate?

Average measure of fertility in the county

65

What are the types of ageing?

Numerical
Structural

66

What is numerical ageing?

The ABSOLUTE increase in the population that is elderly
- reflects demographic patterns
- shows us improvement in life expectancy

67

What is structural ageing?

the increase in the PROPORTION (%) of the population that is elderly
- fertility rates decreasing
Began occurring in the 1800s

68

Impacts of aging are:

Natural decline
Absolute decline

69

What is natural decline?

More deaths than birth in a population

Combo of absolute and structural ageing

70

What is absolute decline?

occurs when there is insufficient
migration to replace the ‘lost’ births and increased
deaths
– Not expected to happen in NZ for 70+ years
- Happening in some European and Asian countries

71

Dependency ratio:

Child - children/working age x 100

Elderly - elderly/working age x 100

Total (Youth + elderly) / working age x 100

72

What is your acronym to remember NZdep, dimensions of deprivation?

SCLIITSQOE

73

What is the dimension of deprivation the?

Support
Communication
Living space
Income
Income
Qualifications
Owned home
Employment

74

What is support in NZdep?

People aged <65 living in a single parent family

75

What is communication in nzdep?

People aged <65 with no access to internet at home

76

What is in NZdep Income? (1)

People aged 18-64 receiving a means tested benefit

77

What is in NZdep income (2)?

People living in equivalised households with income below an income threshold

78

What is in NZdep living spaces?

People living in equivalised households below a bedroom occupancy threshold

79

What is in NZdep transport?

People with no access to a CAR

80

What is in NZdep qualification?

People aged 18-64 with no qualifications NOT EDUCATION

81

What is in NZdep owned home?

People not living in own home

82

What is in NZdep employment?

People aged 18-64 who are unemployed

83

What are the two population measures?

Area measure
Population measure

84

What is area measure?

falls within the living and working model of the Rainbow model (NZdep) the dimension of deprivation

Deprivation
Access

85

What is population measure?

falls under the GLOBAL DETERMINANTS in Rainbow model

income inequality
literacy rates
GDP per capita

86

Dose effect is?

The wealthier you are the healthier you are linear relationship (straight line +ve graph)

Social gradient

87

Are all inequalities inequities?

No, think breast cancer

88

What is intergenerational social mobility?

Intercity link bus ACROSS GENERATIONS

think about mum your gma did they have education?

89

What is intergenerational mobility?

WITHIN think intercellular (IN THE CELL)

where were you 10 years ago and where are you now? It is your own generation

90

What are the determinants of health life stages?

1. pre birth
2. childhood
3. adolescence
4. adulthood
5. older age

91

PBL stages;

1. define the problem
2. identify risk and protective factors
3. develop and test prevention strategies
4. assure widespread adoption
5. monitor and evaluate

92

What are the main ways of population based and high risk individual strategies?

1. Health promotion
- Alma ata 1978
- Ottawa charter 1986
2. Disease prevention
3. Health protection

93

What are the features of health promotion and what are they?

Focus on wellbeing, "You can change your health" health determinants

Alma ata 1978
Primary Health Care

Ottawa charter 1986
Mobilise action for community development
- enable (provide opportunities for all individuals to make healthy life choices..) INDIVIDUAL LEVEL
- advocate -create favourable political economical social... advocating and focus on achieving EQUITY in health) SYSTEMS LEVEL
- mediate - facilitate individuals with opposing interests to work together to compromise for the promotion is health)JOINS INDI GROUPS AND SYSTEMS

94

What are the different scales of determinants?

Upstream and downstream (proximal and distal)

Micro (individual, lvl 1)
Meso (family, living, work, lvl2)
Macro (environment/national/global, lvl 3)

95

What are the two approaches so describing the determinants of describing health inequalities?

Compositional (characteristics) Who lives here?

Contextual (the social, economic and physical characteristics of the area of matter. What is this place like?

96

What are the global determinants? (lvl3)

Income inequality
National income (GDP)
Literacy rates
Free trade agreements

97

Population based mass strategy?

Focus on whole population

Aims to reduce health risk improve the outcome of individuals in the population

Useful for common disease or widespread cause

E.g. immunisation, seat belt law

98

High risk (individual) strategy?

Focus on individuals

Intervention tlike targeting obese adults

Match high risk individuals and intervention

99

Positive of population based strategy

• Radical - addresses underlying causes
• Large potential benefit for whole
population
• Behaviourally appropriate

100

Negative of population based strategy?

• Small benefit to individuals
• Poor motivation of individuals
• Whole population is exposed to
downside of strategy
(less favourable benefit-to-risk
ratio)

101

positive of high risk strategy?

• Appropriate to individuals
• Individual motivation
• Cost effective use of resources
• Favourable benefit-to-risk ratio

102

negative for high risk strategy?

• Cost of screening, need to
identify individuals
• Temporary effect
• Limited potential
• Behaviourally inappropriate

103

What is disease prevention in population health actions?

Disease focused
Looks are particular diseases or injuries of preventing them

104

Disease prevention chart. Pls DRAW NOW

ok

105

Health protection?

Predominantly environmental hazard focused
RORM
- RIsk/hazard assessment
- Monitoring
- Risk communication
- Occupational health

106

The implications of (income) inequities (6)

Ø An unequal society
Ø Less social cohesion
Ø Less trust between groups
Ø Increased stress
Ø Reduced economic productivity
Ø Poorer health outcomes

107

Draw summary table of disease prevention, health promotion and health protection

ok

108

What are the stages of demographic transition?

1. Pre-transition
2. Mortality declines, birth rate remains high
3. Fertility rate begins to decline
4. Low fertility and low mortality

109

What are the 5 priority action areas of Ottawa Charter of 1986?

1. Develop personal skills
2. Strengthen community action
3. Create supportive environments
4. Reorient health services towards primary health care
5. Build healthy public policy

DRSBC

110

What is the example of primary prevention in disease prevention?

Immunisation and seat belts (it is preventing the dis-ease from happening)

111

WHat is the example of secondary prevention in disease prevention?

Screening for high risk individuals
Rescue services if a kid had drowned.

These happen AFTER the disease nut BEFORE it has been clincally diagnosed

112

What is the example of tertiary prevention in disease prevention?

"try to get you better" minimise the consequences of the dis-ease like counselling to make secondary better

113

What is an example of health protection?

Think environment, hazards management like the helmets when working outside and also the drug label "keep out of reach of children" statement in bottles of meds.