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Muscle Anatomy Quiz 1 > Movement > Flashcards

Flashcards in Movement Deck (33):
1

Flexion

Flexion is generally an anterior movement of a body part within the sagittal plane.

(Exceptions include the legs, feet, toes and thumbs)

2

Extension

Is generally a posterior movement within the sagittal plane

(Exceptions include the legs, feet, toes and thumbs)

3

Abduction

Is generally a lateral movement within the frontal plane that is away from the imaginary midline of the body;

Exceptions include: the toes, and fingers, including the thumbs

4

Adduction:



The terms abduction and Adduction are used only for the appendicular body

Is generally a medial movement toward the midline

Exceptions include: the toes, and fingers, including the thumbs

5

Right lateral Flexion




This term used only for the axial body

Is a side-bending movement of the head, neck, and or trunk toward the right within the frontal plane.

6

Left lateral Flexion



This term used only for the axial body

Is a side-bending movement of the head, neck, and or trunk toward the left within the frontal plane.

7

Lateral Rotation:



Also known as external rotation

Is a movement within the transverse plane in which the anterior surface of the body part moves to face more laterally (away from the midline)

These terms are used only for the appendicular body

8

Medial Rotation:



Also known as internal rotation

Moves the anterior surface to face more medially (towards the midline)

These terms are used only for the appendicular body

9

Right rotation



Note: they are also used to describe rotation motions of the pelvis

Is movement within the transverse plane in which the anterior surface of the body part moves to face more to the right

(These terms are used for the axial body only)
Ipsilateral rotation and contralateral rotation are often used to describe motions created by muscles that produce right or left rotation. Describe that a muscle on one side of the body either produces rotation to the same side or opposite side

10

Left rotation:



Note: they are also used to describe rotation motions of the pelvis

Moves the anterior surface to face more to the left.

(These terms are used for the axial body only)

Ipsilateral rotation and contralateral rotation are often used to describe motions created by muscles that produce right or left rotation. Describe that a muscle on one side of the body either produces rotation to the same side or opposite side

11

Elevation

Is a movement wherein the body part moves superiorly

12

Depression

Occurs when the body part moves inferiorly

13

Protraction:

Is a movement wherein the body part moves anteriorly

14

Retraction

Is a movement wherein the body part moves posteriorly

15

Right/Left lateral Deviation

Is a linear movement that occurs in the lateral direction

16

Pronation:

Term can be applied to motion of the forearm and foot.

Pronation refers to the natural side-to-side movement of the foot as you walk or run. It is also known as eversion. The foot rolls a bit inward with each step. From the time your heel strikes the ground, your arch begins to flatten and cushion the shock

17

Supination:

Supination (or under-pronation) is the opposite of pronation and refers to the outward roll of the foot during normal motion. A natural amount of supination occurs during the push-off phase of the running gait as the heel lifts off the ground and the forefoot and toes are used to propel the body forward

18

Inversion:

Is the principal component of supination of the foot.

Inversion and eversion refer to movements that tilt the sole of the foot away from (eversion) or towards (inversion) the midline of the body.

19

Eversion

Is the principal component of pronation of the foot

Eversion is the movement of the sole of the foot away from the median plane. Inversion is the movement of the sole towards the median plane.

20

Dorsiflexion:

The foot moves superiorly (in the direction of it’s dorsal surface)


Technically is extension of the foot

21

Plantar Flexion:

It moves inferiorly (in the direction of it’s plantar surface)

Technically Flexion of the foot

22

Opposition

This movement is called opposition (i.e., of thumb to fingers). During opposition the thumb is rotated around its long axis; it has been said that human civilization depends upon the opposition of the thumb.

23

Reposition:

Reposition is a movement that moves the thumb and the little finger away from each other, effectively reversing opposition.

24

Upward rotation

The scapula upwardly rotates when its glenoid fossa is moved to face more superiorly

25

Downward Rotation:

The scapula upwardly rotates when its glenoid fossa is moved to face more inferiorly

26

Lateral Tilt:

The scapula laterally tilts when its medial border lifts away from the body wall

27

Medial Tilt

The scapula laterally tilts when its medial border lifts away from the body wall (medial tilt Is the opposite motion)

28

Upward Tilt

When it’s inferior angle lifts away from the body wall

29

Downward Tilt

When it’s inferior angle lifts away from the body wall (downward is the opposite motion

30

Horizontal Flexion

Is a movement of the arm or thigh in which it begins in a horizontal position 90 degrees and then moves anteriorly toward the midline of the body.

31

Horizontal Extension

Is a movement of the arm or thigh in which it begins in a horizontal position 90 degrees and then moves anteriorly toward the midline of the body. (Is the movement in the opposite direction.)

32

Hyperextension

Hyperextension is an excessive joint movement in which the angle formed by the bones of a particular joint is opened, or straightened, beyond its normal, healthy, range of motion

33

Circumduction:


Is not a joint action

movement of a limb or extremity so that the distal end describes a circle while the proximal end remains fixed.