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Flashcards in NEW GRE CONTEXTUAL VOCABULARY Deck (171):
1

adversity

difficulty

His was a life filled with ADVERSITY, having spent time in jail on three separate occasions, and then finding it difficult to convince employers to hire him.

2

conciliate

pacify; make calm

It is easier to aggravate a person than it is to CONCILIATE him or her.

3

imminent

about to happen

Once the thunder and lightning started, we knew that rain was IMMINENT.

4

eminent

famous; prominent

Who do you consider the most EMINENT researcher in the field of genetic engineering?

5

reverberate

echo

Sheronica could hear the sound of the engine REVERBERATE in the cool autumn air.

6

abate

become less; diminish

Instead of taking a pain reliever, Carlos simply waited for the pain from his headache to ABATE.

7

apotheosis

ideal model

With her straight-A average and her prowess on the soccer field, Mary is the APOTHEOSIS of the scholar-athlete.

8

assuage

soothe

Linda wasn't able to ASSUAGE her father's concerns about her recent car trouble.

 

9

descry

catch sight of

Although the grass beside the lake was tall and dense, the hunter believed that while hiding there he would still be able to DESCRY the ducks as they landed on the water.

10

gingerly

carefully; delicately

After injuring my foot, I had to walk very GINGERLY.

11

insensible

unresponsive

The effects of the illness rendered the young man almost completely INSENSIBLE.

12

jovially

in a jolly way

With a big smile and a warm hug, my uncle greeted me JOVIALLY.

13

vying

competing with

Two hours into the spelling bee, there were still four contestants VYING for the championship.

14

berate

scold angrily

If you have a complaint, feel free to speak to me, but please do not BERATE me.

15

derogatory

insulting

He was hurt by her remarks becuase they were not just critical but also DEROGATORY.

16

embroiled

deeply involved; entangled

For years the two neighbors had been EMBROILED in a largely friendly but complicated disagreement over the boundaries of their property lines.

17

impugn

verbally attack

The speaker's comments were clearly intended to IMPUGN the reputation of the congresswoman.

18

intransigent

unwilling to compromise

We argued for two hours but neither one of us could convince the other one of anything; I guess we were both pretty INTRANSIGENT.

19

preclude

rule out; prevent

As Flannery O'Connor once said, "Accepting oneself does not PRECLUDE an attempt to become better."

20

rejoinder

quick reply

Marta made a witty comment about John's awful haircut, but John was unable to come up with a good REJOINDER.

21

tirade

long, angry speech

At the end of his TIRADE, I was worn out by the length as well as the underlying hostility of his comments.

22

discern

perceive; distinguish

Because of the fog, the pilot was unable to DISCERN whether the lights up ahead were from a runway.

23

incisively

analytically; intelligently

The critic spoke INCISIVELY about the limitations of recent attempts to understand Shakespeare through computer analysis.

24

morass

swamp; complicated, confusing or troublesome situation

Due to the abrupt resignation of the prime minister and more than half of his cabinet, the political situation in the country had become a MORASS.

25

prone

likely to

She was PRONE to experiencing headaches whenever her level of stress was high.

26

resolute

determined; unhesitating

In private, the congresswoman seemed uncertain about how to address the budget crisis, but once the cameras were rolling she became more RESOLUTE.

27

alleviate

relieve; make easier

The aspirin that Lin took failed to ALLEVIATE the pain from her knee injury.

28

futile

ineffective; useless

As he scrubbed the wall, Kevin realized that any attempts to prevent tiny chips of paint from flaking off would be FUTILE.

29

garrulous

overly talkative

Although ordinarily a man of few words, Quinton became quite GARRULOUS once he began discussing a topic that interested him.

30

gregarious

sociable

Because Johannes is so GREGARIOUS, he seeks a job in which he would have many opportunities to interact with people.

31

perilous

dangerous

Attempting to walk across a busy freeway ay night is PERILOUS, no matter how carefully one proceeds.

32

querulous

often complaining

Due to his QUERULOUS nature, Juan found fault with all of the solutions i proposed for his computer problem.

33

saturate

completely fill; soak

The moment she walked into the room, her perfume began to SATURATE the air.

34

taciturn

not talkative; reserved

The eyewitness did not provide many details about the crime, in part because she was so TACITURN.

35

besotted

intoxicated; infatuated

After spending most of the day relaxing at the beach and drinking margaritas, the man was so BESOTTED with alcohol and sun he could barely find the way back to his hotel room.

36

epitaph

commemorative text on tombstone or monument

The EPITAPH on the gravestone indicated that Smith ahd been a prominent social activist in her day.

37

indignation

anger over injustice

Because they felt that the mayor had been dishonest, the city council addressed him with considerable INDIGNATION.

38

lacerate

cut irregularly; slash

The stunt man took precautions so that he would not LACERATE his skin when he leapt through the plate glass window.

39

liberty

freedom

Freedom of speech does not give citizens the LIBERTY to say anything they want to say in every possible situation.

40

pecuniary

monetary; related to money

As a corporate attorney, one of her responsibilities was to protect her company's PECUNIARY interests.

41

soporific

sleep-producing

Reading late at night has a SOPORIFIC effect on some people, as it helps them fall right to sleep.

42

stolidity

emotionlessness

When the ship grazed the iceberg, the captain's STOLIDITY helped keep the crew from becoming overly panicked.

43

torpor

listlessness; inactivity

The misician was so late to his own concert that a general TORPOR had settled over the audince well before he took the stage.

44

whimsical

playful; impulsive

Karima's sudden decision to paint her room lavender was one of her more WHIMSICAL ideas.

45

chastisement

punishment; scolding

His crimes call for more CHASTISEMENT than I have the energy to deliver.

46

counterpart

thing that resembles, duplicates, or complements another

I suspect that the vice president in my company makes very little money as compared to her COUNTERPART in your company.

47

eccentricity

unconventional behavior

Nia's most noticeable ECCENTRICITY is her choice of hair color - orange on one side of her head, blue on the other.

48

hereditary

inherited; ancestral

Melanie's hearing loss was not due to accident or illness; rather, it was HEREDITARY

49

inclined

likely; having a preference

I work hard for my money, and so I'm not INCLINED to spend it freely.

50

jocosely

with humor

Though the recent firings were a serious matter, the employees in Wilma's unit treated the topic of their job security JOCOSELY.

51

reverent

deeply respectful

Having studied and written about the visual arts for many years, Dwayne had a REVERENT attitude toward genuises such as Picasso.

52

cogent

well-reasoned; convincing

She persuaded me to think her way because her arguments were so COGENT and clear.

53

consummate

masterful; complete

Alice is a CONSUMMATE chef, capable of creating not only delicious entrees but also appetizers, side dishes, and desserts.

54

credulousness

gullibility

The Jenkins family was easily swindled by the con man due to their CREDULOUSNESS.

55

disabuse

correct a mistaken belief

Someone should gently DISABUSE Mike of his belief that he will be a professional basketball player someday, he is too small and too slow.

56

dissemble

deceive; create false impression

Tell me what happened; you don't need to DISSEMBLE anymore.

57

fervid

passionate

Kyle is a FERVID writer; sometimes he will work on an essay for three or four hours straight without moving from his desk.

58

loquacious

talkative

Although he was an eloquent speaker, Jones also tended to be LOQUACIOUS, and so his speeches often ran longer than scheduled.

59

prevarication

lying

She accused my brother of PREVARICATION, but in fact he had made an honest mistake.

60

spurious

false

Because the Senator had never been to Florida, the claim that he had been arrested once in Miami was completely SPURIOUS.

61

assiduously

diligently; persistently

Richard studied ASSIDUOUSLY that night so that he wouldn't fail his history test next morning.

62

inept

incompetent; awkward

Trey guessed that the plumber was INEPT, because when he got home he saw that his basement was knee-deep in water.

63

onerous

burdensome

Reading this chapter in my calculus book is such an ONEROUS task!

64

unassailable

impossible to attack; unalterable

The attorney's closing statement swayed the jury in her client's favor; she spoke with passion, and her logic was UNASSAILABLE.

65

undaunted

not discouraged; resolute

She continued to drive toward Anchorage, UNDAUNTED by the blizzard that was raging outside the car.

66

craven

cowardly

I'll never know the identity of the CRAVEN person who left an insulting note on my desk but wasn't brave enough to sign it.

67

encomium

a tribute; a formal expression of praise

After her father passed away, Reika prepared an ENCOMIUM to be read at the memorial service in order to honor his memory.

68

exonerate

free from blame; absolve

Although he appears to be guilty, a closer look at the evidence will surely EXONERATE the defendant.

69

magnanimous

generous and noble

How MAGNANIMOUS of her to forgive her ex-husband for years of neglect and hurtful behavior!

70

nefarious

wicked

According to historical accounts, the king was a NEFARIOUS man who betrayed both friends and enemies without remorse.

71

obsequious

overly eager to please; servile

Jill had a disturbingly OBSEQUIOUS way of trying to win favor with authority figures.

72

quisling

traitor; collaborator

Benedict Arnold was a well-known QUISLING who had been an American general before defecting to the British Army.

73

transgressions

misdeeds; crimes

The tribal court found the young woman guilty of numerous TRANSGRESSIONS.

74

vilified

maligned; spoken very badly of

The dictator was VILIFIED by the press for many decedes of oppressive policies.

75

aristocratic

noble

My dog walks around with such a regal expression, you would think she had an ARISTOCRATIC background.

76

canon

representative works

Scholars have yet to agree about the authorship of some of the works in the Shakespearean CANON.

77

prolific

highly productive; fecund

She was a PROLIFIC artist, often producing as many as three canvases per week.

78

tome

scholarly book

Last year, Jackson published a massive TOME summarizing the major battles of the U.S. Civil War.

79

unabated

continued at full strength

UNABATED even after three hours, the storm continued to batter the little house.

80

venerated

deeply respected; revered

The old general was VENERATED by his troops.

81

advocate

argue (in support of)

Jerome wanted to become a congressman so that he could ADVOCATE for the people's interests.

82

bombastic

pompous; overblown

During the discussion, Beverly had become so BOMBASTIC that even those who supported her point of view grew weary of her speeches.

83

brevity

conciseness of expression

BREVITY is called for in this situation, because we are running short of time.

84

hyperbole

exaggeration

I admit that my car isn't beautiful, but to call it the ugliest and most useless piece of machinery you've ever seen is just plain HYPERBOLE.

85

unassuming

modest

Once you have achieved great success, the more UNASSUMING you are in your dealings with people, the more they will respect you.

86

brimming

overflowing; completely full

Sometimes I am envious of the way children wake up every morning BRIMMING with energy.

87

disconcerting

troubling; causing uneasiness

The teacher found it somewhat DISCONCERTING that his best student did so poorly on the most recent test.

88

ensued

followed as a result

The two men argued for a long time before one shoved the other and a fistfight ENSUED.

89

fortuitously

by chance; fortunately

While driving across town, the engine of Brittany's car suddenly cut off; FORTUITOUSLY, she rolled to a stop less than 50 yards from a garage.

90

morose

gloomy

From his MOROSE expression I could tell that he was depressed.

91

neophyte

beginner

He plays guitar quite well for a NEOPHYTE.

92

nugatory

trivial; of no value

Because nobody enforces this particular regulation, industry leaders consider it NUGATORY.

93

obstreperous

loudly defiant

It is not easy to negotiate a compromise with an OBSTREPEROUS person.

94

officious

intrusive; meddling

It seems rather OFFICIOUS of Jack to be constantly poking his nose into Adrianna's business and telling her what to do.

95

ruminating

thinking again and again about a topic

You will never catch Tricia RUMINATING about how to handle a difficult situation; rather she acts decisively and never second-guesses herself.

96

autonomous

independent; self-governed

Agency leaders hope to function in a more AUTONOMOUS way once the new legislation is passed, ratherthan continuing to rely on each other for support.

97

equanimity

even-temperedness; calmness

People who are at complete peace with themselves can face the world with complete EQUANIMITY.

98

mollify

soothe; pacify

No matter how hard I tried, I was unable to MOLLIFY the angry woman.

99

petulant

irritable; rude

The more we talked, the more we got on each other's nerves; I have to admit that we were both awfully PETULANT.

100

propensity

tendency

Jada has a PROPENSITY to overthink her homework assignments.

101

tractable

easily managed or controlled

Because Henry was so TRACTABLE, his boss often took advantage of him.

102

fatuous

foolish

With a FATUOUS smile, the student walked up to the blackboard and proceeded to write down the wrong answer to the teacher's question.

103

forestall

prevent; ward off

The president's economic advisors held an emergency meeting to discuss how to FORESTALL the country's imminent financial crisis.

104

gouge

cheat; extort

This particular corporation has a nasty tendency to GOUGE its clients at every opportunity.

105

lucidity

clarity

Watkins' argument before the high court was remarkable for both its passion as well as its LUCIDITY.

106

ludicrous

ridiculous; absurd and laughable

Lonnie has never stolen anything in his entire life; the allegation that he took Rosalind's purse is completely LUDICROUS.

107

minatory

threatening

Because of his great size, a scowling expression, and the prominent scar on one cheek, John had a rather MINATORY appearance.

108

obviate

make unnecessary

Wearing a helmet while riding a bicycle can OBVIATE the risk of injury.

109

quibbles

trivial complaints or objections

As the committee worked together on a draft of the document, there were numerous QUIBBLES about minor details of the wording.

110

refractory

stubborn; unresponsible

Like a REFRACTORY child, the patient refused to take his medicine.

111

subsided

diminished; abated

Once the floodwaters had SUBSIDED, the engineers were able to evaluate the extent of the damage.

112

chagrin

emotional distress due to error or failure

Much to her CHAGRIN, Melissa realized that her comment had deeply offended their host.

113

furtively

secretly; evasively\

If you listen to the tape closely, you can hear Tammy and Cyndi whispering FURTIVELY in the background.

114

protracting

lengthening

The two committee members kept on quibbling over a trivial point, thereby PROTRACTING the meeting.

115

stammered

spoke haltingly, with unintended pauses and repetitions

The witness was clearly intimidated by the atmosphere of the courtroom and consequently STAMMERED through most of his testimony.

116

vacated

left; emptied

Once the tenants had VACATED the apartment, the landlord was able to replace the carpeting.

117

cognizant

aware

The neurosurgeon began the delicate process of removing the tumor, fully COGNIZANT of the fact that the slightest mistake could cause further damage.

118

despondent

without hope

After failing three classes last semester, Blake became DESPONDENT and decided to drop out of college.

119

divulged

revealed secret or private information

Jim's wife wanted to know exactly how much information he had DIVULGED to friends about their last quarrel.

120

entails

requires; logically implies

Being the accountant for this particular company ENTAILS more than the usual range of responsibilites.

121

goad

provoke; prod

If you continue to GOAD Darla with complaints about her attitude, she is likely to respond by becoming even less cooperative.

122

proclaimed

announced; formally declared

Today the leaders of the two countries PROCLAIMED that a new era of peace between them had arrived.

123

resilient

capable of recovering easily

Because she is so RESILIENT, I'm sure Debbie will overcome this latest setback.

124

stymied

thwarted; blocked

Efforts by the two senators to gather suppport for their tax reform bill were STYMIED by a lck of public support for the bill.

125

vacillated

shifted indecisively

They VACILLATED too long and the opportunity was lost.

126

vicariously

secondhand; indirectly

Phil was deeply involved in every aspect of his son's life, and his mood was closely linked to his son's successes and failures; many people thought that Phil was living VICARIOUSLY through the boy.

127

welter

disorderly mix; clutter

Abe's desk was a WELTER of books, articles, and papers, along with photographs of his three children, an ashtray or two, and the occasional soda can.

128

autocratic

excessively controlling

Even at home, the executive exhibited a disturbingly AUTOCRATIC personality; at all times he expected compliance from his wife and obedience from his children.

129

coerced

forced

Did the soldiers volunteer for this assignment, or were they COERCED by their commanding officer?

130

pageant

elaborate public display

The third graders at Kelley's school put on a delightful PAGEANT to celebrate the arrival of spring.

131

sentient

conscious; able to perceive

Bill was an avid astronomer and science-fiction buff who hoped that someday SENTIENT beings would be discovered on some distant planet.

132

sublime

awe-inspiring; exalted

Our trip to southern Italy last summer was absolutely SUBLIME.

133

entreated

requested urgently

A hint of desperation crept into her voice as Janet ENTREATED the ticket agent to sell her a seat on the next flight.

134

gaudy

tastelessly showy

Carly's diamond-encrusted pendant is one of the largest and most GAUDY pieces of jewelry I have seen in years.

135

hiatus

temporart break; gap

Jean is taking a little HIATUS from work this week in order to attend to some personal matters.

136

histrionics

overly dramatic and emotional behavior

I wasn't impressed by the actor's HISTRIONICS; I felt that he exaggerated his character's inner torment to the point of caricature.

137

inconspicuous

not readily noticed

An experienced spy knows how to be present and yet INCONSPICUOUS.

138

indigenous

native

The Yanomamo are an INDIGENOUS people who live in the upper Amazon region of South America.

139

nascent

emerging; coming into being

Last year Marquis started his own consulting firm; he worked long hours at first as he sought to attract clients to his NASCENT business.

140

nomenclature

a set of names and rules for naming

Having learned the NOMENCLATURE for describing the various types of beer, Ralph enjoyed showing off his newfound knowledge to his friends.

141

oblivious

unmindful; unaware

It amazes me sometimes how OBLIVIOUS my young son can be to the fact that one of his shoelaces is untied, or that he has peanut butter smeared on his pants, or that he has put his shirt on backwards.

142

tenacious

persistent; holding fast

If you are sufficiently TENACIOUS, you can achieve almost anything.

143

traversing

traveling across

Although as a child he had been bitten by a rattlesnake there, Dan's fondness for TRAVERSING the Arizona desert was as strong as it had ever been.

144

abstained

willingly refrained from

Sid always ABSTAINED from alcohol on the night before an important exam.

145

audacious

fearless; recklessly daring

Briar's plan to hike the Italian Alps by herself next summer is quite AUDACIOUS!

146

infamy

reputation for evil

After his conviction for allowing prisoners to be both verbally and physically abused, the warden's INFAMY quickly grew throughout the state.

147

iniquity

wickedness

The man's INIQUITY was reflected in his extensive history of theft and assault.

148

licentious

sexually immoral; lacking in moral restraint

The president of the school board has been accused of being LICENTIOUS, but he is in fact a devoted and faithful husband.

149

haphazardly

carelessly; randomly

When I saw how HAPHAZARDLY computer parts were strewn across Kayla's desk, I began to question whether I should allow her to fix my own computer.

150

humility

humbleness

The student demonstrated his HUMILITY by approaching the master quietly and addressing the old man in the most respectful language.

151

ingenuity

inventiveness; cleverness

Alma demonstrated great INGENUITY by deriving the formula before anyone else in the class was even halfway finished.

152

nonchalant

seemingly indifferent; cool and casual

With their deadline rapidly approaching, the other members of the research team found Myra's NONCHALANT attitude to be rather annoying.

153

opulent

luxurious; rich

The day after George proposed, Liza showed up at work wearing the large and OPULENT ring he had given her.

154

throng

densely packed group; crowd

A THRONG of people gathered at the scene of the accident.

155

unorthodox

unconventional

J.T.'s habit of teasing customers during their initial contact with him is an UNORTHODOX approach to selling cars.

156

variegated

multi-colored

I don't want a plain old monochromatic suit; show me something bright and VARIEGATED.

157

winsome

charming in a childlike way

My cousin's son is the most delightful, WINSOME little boy.

158

wry

sarcastic; momentarily twisted

With a WRY smile, Jake explained that he had been fired because he performed his job too well.

159

atrocious

exceptionally bad; brutal

In my opinion, her behavior was ATROCIOUS and deserving of severe punishment.

160

bulbous

swollen; rounded

Whereas most boxers have flattened noses after many years in the ring, Mike's nose was rather BULBOUS.

161

florid

reddish; excessively ornamented

Paul's face was quite FLORID after spending all day out in the sun,

162

protruded

extended outward

The lizard's tail PROTRUDED from behind the rock.

163

surmounted

topped; overcame

He had SURMOUNTED many obstacles on his way to a successful career.

164

hortatory

strongly encouraging

Even when his team was winning by a large margin, Coach Brown's halftime speeches were always strongly HORTATORY.

165

inaugural

initial; formally marking a beginning

He planned to attend the INAUGURAL ceremony marking the opening of his best friend's charter school.

166

inculcate

instill; indoctrinate

In teaching his students carpentry, Steve tries to INCULCATE in them respect for the materials and an appreciation of the craft.

167

munificent

extremely generous

Gifts from its most MUNIFICENT citizens have allowed the town to remodel city hall.

168

nepotism

favoritism toward family or friends by someone in power

As his uncle is vice president of our company, it seems he got his job through NEPOTISM rather than his own qualifications.

169

opined

expressed opinion

"We need a new governor," OPINED Timothy, "and we need one now."

170

weal

prosperity; well-being

My interest is not in protecting the wealthiest citizens, since they can take care of themselves, but rather in promoting the common WEAL.

171

zealot

fanatic

Alice is a ZEALOT about promoting clean energy whenever she can.