Poetry - Love and Relationships Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Poetry - Love and Relationships Deck (18)
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1

Neutral Tones:
‘a grin of bitterness’

Oxymoron
He knew her so well that he knows the smile was fake

2

Neutral Tones:
‘they had fallen from an ash, and were grey’

‘Ash’ - type of tree, metaphor for deadness
Caesura
Nothing alive left of repetition
‘Gray’ - no colour, no joy anymore
Cyclical structure - comes back to same idea at end of poem
Pathetic fallacy
Semantic field of loss

3

Neutral Tones:
‘We stood by a pond’

‘We’ - inclusive pronoun
‘stood’ - past tense, not continuous to show relationship is over

4

When We Two Parted:
‘in silence and tears’

Cyclical structure - he’s not over her
Quiet and awkward
She’s in silence, he’s in tears

5

When We Two Parted:
‘a knell in mine ear’

Metaphor
Alarm bells ringing, warning
Death knell, relationship is over
Constant reminder

6

When We Two Parted:
‘long, long shall I rue thee’

Caesura - slows pace
Repetition - emphasis
‘Rue’ - regret, he’s not over her

7

Similarities between ‘When We Two Parted’ and ‘Neutral Tones’

Remembrance - ‘the smile on you mouth’ (NT); ‘after long years’ (WWTP)

Cyclical structure - ‘a pond edged with grayish leaves’ (NT); ‘in silence and tears’ (WWTP)

8

Differences between ‘When We Two Parted’ and ‘Neutral Tones’

Secrecy - ‘eyes that rove’ (NT); ‘they knew not I knew thee’ (WWTP)

Setting/pathetic fallacy - ‘by a pond’ (NT); ‘in secret we met’ (WWTP)

Breakup - ‘words played between us to and fro’ (NT), ‘half broken-hearted’ (WWTP)

9

The Farmer’s Bride:
‘I chose a maid’

‘I’ - personal pronoun
He picked her and has dominance
‘maid’ - belittling

10

The Farmer’s Bride:
‘We chased her, flying like a hare’

Simile
‘Hare’ - semantic field of dehumanisation
Described as an animal
Predator and prey

11

The Farmer’s Bride:
‘like a little frightened fay’

Simile
Alliteration
‘Fay’ - childish

12

Porphyria’s Lover:
‘give herself to me for ever.’

‘Me’ - personal pronoun
Declarative
Losing virginity
End stopped line - final, the end
‘For ever’ - irreversible

13

Porphyria’s Lover
‘propped her head up as before, only this time my shoulder bore her head’

‘My’ - personal possessive
Change in dominance

14

Porphyria’s Lover:
‘I am quite sure she felt no pain’

Declarative
Repetition to reassure himself
Casual, having a conversation with us
Ironic concern

15

Porphyria’s Lover:
‘murmuring how she loved me’

‘She’ - singular pronoun
‘Murmuring’ - intimate, secretive
She has dominance

16

Porphyria’s Lover:
‘She shut the cold out’ and ‘made… all the cottage warm’

‘She’ - active, dominant
Metaphor - also warms his soul
She is a beacon of light and warmth

17

Similarities between ‘The Farmer’s Bride’ and ‘Porphyria’s Lover’

About failed relationships

Told from a male point of view: (FB) ‘I chose a maid’, (PL) ‘She sat down by my side’

Male dominance: (FB) ‘we caught her... and turned the key upon her fast’, (PL) ‘Give herself to me for ever,’

18

Differences between ‘The Farmer’s Bride’ and ‘Porphyria’s Lover’

Love: (FB) ‘she turned afraid’ didn’t love him, (PL) ‘murmuring how she loved me’
Narrative perspective: (FB) ‘hardly heard her speak at all’ not trying to hide the fact their relationship isn’t normal, (PL) ‘happy and proud’ trying to pretend