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Flashcards in Teacher Refresh Deck (92):
1

What does Whakataukī mean in Te Reo?

Proverbs

2

What is the Maori word for Proverbs?

Whakataukī

3

to "twining". It may also refer to the resulting bands of weaving, or to the traditional designs. The tāniko technique does not require a loom, although one can be used.
https://teara.govt.nz/en/te-raranga-me-te-whatu/page-3

Tāniko (or taaniko)

4

Tāniko (or taaniko) is a __________________ of the Māori of New Zealand related to "twining". It may also refer to the resulting bands of weaving, or to the traditional designs. The tāniko technique does not require a loom, although one can be used.
https://teara.govt.nz/en/te-raranga-me-te-whatu/page-3

traditional weaving technique

5

Tāniko (or taaniko) is a traditional weaving technique of the Māori of New Zealand related to "twining". It may also refer to the _____________, or to the traditional designs. The tāniko technique does not require a loom, although one can be used.
https://teara.govt.nz/en/te-raranga-me-te-whatu/page-3

resulting bands of weaving

6

Tāniko (or taaniko) is a traditional weaving technique of the Māori of New Zealand related to "twining". It may also refer to the resulting bands of weaving, or to the ______________. The tāniko technique does not require a loom, although one can be used.
https://teara.govt.nz/en/te-raranga-me-te-whatu/page-3

traditional designs

7

Tāniko (or taaniko) is a traditional weaving technique of the Māori of New Zealand related to "twining". It may also refer to the resulting bands of weaving, or to the traditional designs. The tāniko technique _________________, although one can be used.
https://teara.govt.nz/en/te-raranga-me-te-whatu/page-3

does not require a loom

8

Tāniko (or taaniko) is a traditional weaving technique of the Māori of New Zealand related to "twining". It may also refer to the resulting bands of weaving, or to the traditional designs. The tāniko technique does not require a loom, _______________.
https://teara.govt.nz/en/te-raranga-me-te-whatu/page-3

although one can be used

9

___________ is defined as a means to “'step up', 'lift up', or lengthen one's stride'.” In 2013, the Ministry revised and refreshed this strategy and released Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success 2013-2017.
https://kep.org.nz/about

Ka Hikitia

10

Ka Hikitia is defined _________ “'step up', 'lift up', or lengthen one's stride'.” In 2013, the Ministry revised and refreshed this strategy and released Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success 2013-2017.
https://kep.org.nz/about

as a means to

11

Ka Hikitia is defined as a means to “_____, 'lift up', or lengthen one's stride'.” In 2013, the Ministry revised and refreshed this strategy and released Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success 2013-2017.
https://kep.org.nz/about

'step up'

12

Ka Hikitia is defined as a means to “'step up', '_________', or lengthen one's stride'.” In 2013, the Ministry revised and refreshed this strategy and released Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success 2013-2017.
https://kep.org.nz/about

lift up

13

Ka Hikitia is defined as a means to “'step up', 'lift up', or _______________.” In 2013, the Ministry revised and refreshed this strategy and released Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success 2013-2017.
https://kep.org.nz/about

lengthen one's stride'

14

__________________ - process of establishing relationships, relating well to others
https://maoridictionary.co.nz/word/12711

whakawhanaungatanga

15

whakawhanaungatanga - _________________, relating well to others
https://maoridictionary.co.nz/word/12711

process of establishing relationships

16

whakawhanaungatanga - process of establishing relationships, __________________
https://maoridictionary.co.nz/word/12711

relating well to others

17

whakawhanaungatanga - ______________________________________
https://maoridictionary.co.nz/word/12711

process of establishing relationships, relating well to others

18

___________ is a Māori concept with a wide range of meanings — culture, custom, ethic, etiquette, fashion, formality, lore, manner, meaning, mechanism, method, protocol, style.
Generally taken to mean "the Māori way of doing things", it is derived from the Māori word tika meaning 'right' or 'correct'.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikanga_M%C4%81ori

Tikanga

19

Tikanga is a Māori concept with a wide range of meanings — culture, custom, ethic, etiquette, fashion, formality, lore, manner, meaning, mechanism, method, protocol, style.
Generally taken to mean "___________________", it is derived from the Māori word tika meaning 'right' or 'correct'.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikanga_M%C4%81ori

the Māori way of doing things

20

Tikanga is a Māori concept with a wide range of meanings — culture, custom, ethic, etiquette, fashion, formality, lore, manner, meaning, mechanism, method, protocol, style.
Generally taken to mean "the Māori way of doing things", it is derived from the Māori word __________ meaning 'right' or 'correct'.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikanga_M%C4%81ori

tika

21

Tikanga is a Māori concept with a wide range of meanings — culture, custom, ethic, etiquette, fashion, formality, lore, manner, meaning, mechanism, method, protocol, style.
Generally taken to mean "the Māori way of doing things", it is derived from the Māori word tika meaning ______________.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikanga_M%C4%81ori

'right' or 'correct'

22

From about the 1980s ___________ began to appear in common New Zealand English because of new laws that specified the need for consultation with local iwi (tribal) representatives in many major fields such as resource management.
On July 2, 2011, the Waitangi Tribunal released its report into the Wai 262 claim, Ko Aotearoa Tēnei ("This is Aotearoa (New Zealand)").[1] The report considers more than 20 Government departments and agencies and makes recommendations as to reforms of "laws, policies or practices relating to health, education, science, intellectual property, indigenous flora and fauna, resource management, conservation, the Māori language, arts and culture, heritage, and the involvement of Māori in the development of New Zealand’s positions on international instruments affecting indigenous rights."[2]
The second volume of the report contains a glossary of te reo Māori terms, including:
• __________: traditional rules for conducting life, custom, method, rule, law
• _____________ Māori: Māori traditional rules, culture
For an interpretation of the conflicts between Tikanga Maori and Western/Pakeha jurisprudence, see the case of the burial of James Takamore.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikanga_M%C4%81ori

tikanga

23

From about the 1980s it began to appear in common New Zealand English because of new laws that specified the need for consultation with local iwi (tribal) representatives in many major fields such as resource management.
On July 2, 2011, the Waitangi Tribunal released its report into the Wai 262 claim, ____________ ("This is Aotearoa (New Zealand)").[1] The report considers more than 20 Government departments and agencies and makes recommendations as to reforms of "laws, policies or practices relating to health, education, science, intellectual property, indigenous flora and fauna, resource management, conservation, the Māori language, arts and culture, heritage, and the involvement of Māori in the development of New Zealand’s positions on international instruments affecting indigenous rights."[2]
The second volume of the report contains a glossary of te reo Māori terms, including:
• tikanga: traditional rules for conducting life, custom, method, rule, law
• tikanga Māori: Māori traditional rules, culture
For an interpretation of the conflicts between Tikanga Maori and Western/Pakeha jurisprudence, see the case of the burial of James Takamore.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikanga_M%C4%81ori

Ko Aotearoa Tēnei

24

From about the 1980s it began to appear in common New Zealand English because of new laws that specified the need for consultation with local iwi (tribal) representatives in many major fields such as resource management.
On July 2, 2011, the Waitangi Tribunal released its report into the Wai 262 claim, Ko Aotearoa Tēnei ("__________ (New Zealand)").[1] The report considers more than 20 Government departments and agencies and makes recommendations as to reforms of "laws, policies or practices relating to health, education, science, intellectual property, indigenous flora and fauna, resource management, conservation, the Māori language, arts and culture, heritage, and the involvement of Māori in the development of New Zealand’s positions on international instruments affecting indigenous rights."[2]
The second volume of the report contains a glossary of te reo Māori terms, including:
• tikanga: traditional rules for conducting life, custom, method, rule, law
• tikanga Māori: Māori traditional rules, culture
For an interpretation of the conflicts between Tikanga Maori and Western/Pakeha jurisprudence, see the case of the burial of James Takamore.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikanga_M%C4%81ori

This is Aotearoa

25

From about the 1980s it began to appear in common New Zealand English because of new laws that specified the need for consultation with local iwi (tribal) representatives in many major fields such as resource management.
On July 2, 2011, the Waitangi Tribunal released its report into the Wai 262 claim, Ko Aotearoa Tēnei ("This is Aotearoa (New Zealand)").[1] The report considers more than 20 Government departments and agencies and makes recommendations as to reforms of "laws, policies or practices relating to health, education, science, intellectual property, indigenous flora and fauna, resource management, conservation, the Māori language, arts and culture, heritage, and the involvement of Māori in the development of New Zealand’s positions on international instruments affecting indigenous rights."[2]
The second volume of the report contains a glossary of te reo Māori terms, including:
• ________: traditional rules for conducting life, custom, method, rule, law
• ________ Māori: Māori traditional rules, culture
For an interpretation of the conflicts between Tikanga Maori and Western/Pakeha jurisprudence, see the case of the burial of James Takamore.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikanga_M%C4%81ori

tikanga

26

From about the 1980s it began to appear in common New Zealand English because of new laws that specified the need for consultation with local iwi (tribal) representatives in many major fields such as resource management.
On July 2, 2011, the Waitangi Tribunal released its report into the Wai 262 claim, Ko Aotearoa Tēnei ("This is Aotearoa (New Zealand)").[1] The report considers more than 20 Government departments and agencies and makes recommendations as to reforms of "laws, policies or practices relating to health, education, science, intellectual property, indigenous flora and fauna, resource management, conservation, the Māori language, arts and culture, heritage, and the involvement of Māori in the development of New Zealand’s positions on international instruments affecting indigenous rights."[2]
The second volume of the report contains a glossary of te reo Māori terms, including:
• tikanga: traditional rules for conducting life, custom, method, rule, law
• ___________: Māori traditional rules, culture
For an interpretation of the conflicts between ___________ and Western/Pakeha jurisprudence, see the case of the burial of James Takamore.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikanga_M%C4%81ori

tikanga Māori

27

From about the 1980s it began to appear in common New Zealand English because of new laws that specified the need for consultation with local iwi (tribal) representatives in many major fields such as resource management.
On July 2, 2011, the Waitangi Tribunal released its report into the Wai 262 claim, Ko Aotearoa Tēnei ("This is Aotearoa (New Zealand)").[1] The report considers more than 20 Government departments and agencies and makes recommendations as to reforms of "laws, policies or practices relating to health, education, science, intellectual property, indigenous flora and fauna, resource management, conservation, the Māori language, arts and culture, heritage, and the involvement of Māori in the development of New Zealand’s positions on international instruments affecting indigenous rights."[2]
The second volume of the report contains a glossary of te reo Māori terms, including:
• tikanga: traditional rules for conducting life, custom, method, rule, law
• tikanga Māori: ___________________
For an interpretation of the conflicts between Tikanga Maori and Western/Pakeha jurisprudence, see the case of the burial of James Takamore.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikanga_M%C4%81ori

Māori traditional rules, culture

28

___________ - The vision that unperpins Te Whāriki, "implies a society that recognises Māori as tangata whenua, assumes a shared obligation for protecting Māori language and culture, and ensures that Māori are able to enjoy educational success as Maori."

Te Whāriki, page 6

Te Ao Maori

29

Te Ao Maori - The vision that unperpins Te Whāriki, "__________ that recognises Māori as tangata whenua, assumes a shared obligation for protecting Māori language and culture, and ensures that Māori are able to enjoy educational success as Maori."

Te Whāriki, page 6

implies a society

30

Te Ao Maori - The vision that unperpins Te Whāriki, "implies a society that _______________, assumes a shared obligation for protecting Māori language and culture, and ensures that Māori are able to enjoy educational success as Maori."

Te Whāriki, page 6

recognises Māori as tangata whenua

31

Te Ao Maori - The vision that unperpins Te Whāriki, "implies a society that recognises Māori as tangata whenua, ________________ for protecting Māori language and culture, and ensures that Māori are able to enjoy educational success as Maori."

Te Whāriki, page 6

assumes a shared obligation

32

Te Ao Maori - The vision that unperpins Te Whāriki, "implies a society that recognises Māori as tangata whenua, assumes a shared obligation for _____________________, and ensures that Māori are able to enjoy educational success as Maori."

Te Whāriki, page 6

protecting Māori language and culture

33

Te Ao Maori - The vision that unperpins Te Whāriki, "implies a society that recognises Māori as tangata whenua, _____________________________, and ensures that Māori are able to enjoy educational success as Maori."

Te Whāriki, page 6

assumes a shared obligation for protecting Māori language and culture

34

Te Ao Maori - The vision that unperpins Te Whāriki, "implies a society that recognises Māori as tangata whenua, assumes a shared obligation for protecting Māori language and culture, and _______ Māori are able to enjoy educational success as Maori."

Te Whāriki, page 6

ensures that

35

Te Ao Maori - The vision that unperpins Te Whāriki, "implies a society that recognises Māori as tangata whenua, assumes a shared obligation for protecting Māori language and culture, and ensures that ________________________."

Te Whāriki, page 6

Māori are able to enjoy educational success as Maori

36

_________ - The literal meaning of ___________ is 'the woven mat'. It is the MOE early childhood curriculum.

Te Whāriki

37

curriculum.

'the woven mat'

38

Te Whāriki - The literal meaning of Te Whāriki is 'the woven mat'. It is the MOE ________________.

early childhood curriculum.

39

A ___________________ starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.

productive partnership

40

connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.
Ka Hikitia

starts with the understanding

41

A productive partnership starts with the understanding _______________________________ and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.

that Maori children and students are connected to whanau

42

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and ____________________ separate, isolated or disconnected. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.

should not be viewed or treated as

43

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as ____________, isolated or disconnected. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.

separate

44

connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, ___________ or disconnected. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.
Ka Hikitia

isolated

45

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated _______________. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.
Ka Hikitia

or disconnected

46

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as ______________________. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.
Ka Hikitia

separate, isolated or disconnected

47

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and ____________________________________. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.

should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected

48

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to _________________ and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected. P must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.

Parents and whanau

49

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected. Parents and whanau ________ be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.


Ka Hikitia

must

50

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected. Parents and whanau must ____________________________________________. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.

be involved in conversations about their children and their learning

51

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected. ___________________________________________________________. They need accessible evidence-based information on how to support their children’s learning and success.

Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning

52

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. _____________________________ on how to support their children’s learning and success.
Ka Hikitia

They need accessible evidence-based information

53

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Maori children and students are connected to whanau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected. Parents and whanau must be involved in conversations about their children and their learning. They need accessible evidence-based information ________________________________.
Ka Hikitia

on how to support their children’s learning and success

54

______________________
In English and Maori medium education
• All Maori students have strong literacy, numeracy and language skills.
• All Maori students achieve at least National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) Level 2 or an equivalent qualification.

Ka Hikitia

Ka Hikitia Focus Area 3

55

Ka Hikitia Focus Area 3
_______________________________
• All Maori students have strong literacy, numeracy and language skills.
• All Maori students achieve at least National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) Level 2 or an equivalent qualification.

Ka Hikitia

In English and Maori medium education

56

Ka Hikitia Focus Area 3
In English and Maori medium education
• All Maori students have _____________________________.
• All Maori students achieve at least National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) Level 2 or an equivalent qualification.

Ka Hikitia

strong literacy, numeracy and language skills

57

Ka Hikitia Focus Area 3

In English and Maori medium education
• All Maori students have strong literacy, numeracy and language skills.
• All Maori students achieve at least _____________________________ or an equivalent qualification.

Ka Hikitia

National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) Level 2

58

Ka Hikitia Focus Area 3
In English and Maori medium education
• All Maori students have strong literacy, numeracy and language skills.
• All Maori students achieve at least National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) Level 2 or _________________________.

Ka Hikitia

an equivalent qualification

59

_____________ - 3. (noun) tribal knowledge, lore, learning - important traditional cultural, religious, historical, genealogical and philosophical knowledge.
http://maoridictionary.co.nz/search?keywords=wananga

Wananga

60

Wananga - 3. (noun) ____________________ - important traditional cultural, religious, historical, genealogical and philosophical knowledge.
http://maoridictionary.co.nz/search?keywords=wananga

tribal knowledge, lore, learning

61

Raising Expectations
_________________________ are most likely to succeed. Education professionals who hold lower expectations for Maori students may harm students learning opportunities and outcomes. Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013 – 2017 requires the development of approaches to support all stakeholders to hold high expectations for all Maori students.
Ka Hikitia page 39

Students who expect and are expected to succeed

62

Raising Expectations
Students who expect and are expected to succeed ______________. Education professionals who hold lower expectations for Maori students may harm students learning opportunities and outcomes. Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013 – 2017 requires the development of approaches to support all stakeholders to hold high expectations for all Maori students.
Ka Hikitia page 39

are most likely to succeed

63

Raising Expectations
Students who expect and are expected to succeed are most likely to succeed. ______________________________________ may harm students learning opportunities and outcomes. Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013 – 2017 requires the development of approaches to support all stakeholders to hold high expectations for all Maori students.
Ka Hikitia page 39

Students who expect and are expected to succeed are most likely to succeed

64

Students who expect and are expected to succeed are most likely to succeed. Education professionals who hold lower expectations for Maori students ____________________. Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013 – 2017 requires the development of approaches to support all stakeholders to hold high expectations for all Maori students.
Ka Hikitia page 39

may harm students learning opportunities and outcomes

65

Raising Expectations
Students who expect and are expected to succeed are most likely to succeed. _________________________________________. Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013 – 2017 requires the development of approaches to support all stakeholders to hold high expectations for all Maori students.
Ka Hikitia page 39

Education professionals who hold lower expectations for Maori students may harm students learning opportunities and outcomes

66

Students who expect and are expected to succeed are most likely to succeed. Education professionals who hold lower expectations for Maori students may harm students learning opportunities and outcomes. Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013 – 2017 requires the development of approaches to support all stakeholders to ______________________.
Ka Hikitia page 39

hold high expectations for all Maori students

67

Raising Expectations
______________________________. Education professionals who hold lower expectations for Maori students may harm students learning opportunities and outcomes. Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013 – 2017 requires the development of approaches to support all stakeholders to hold high expectations for all Maori students.
Ka Hikitia page 39

Students who expect and are expected to succeed are most likely to succeed

68

_________________ – teachers promote, monitor and reflect on outcomes that in turn lead to improvements in educational achievement for Māori students.

http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

Kotahitanga

69

Kotahitanga – teachers _____________, monitor and reflect on outcomes that in turn lead to improvements in educational achievement for Māori students.

http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

promote

70

Kotahitanga – teachers promote, ______________ and reflect on outcomes that in turn lead to improvements in educational achievement for Māori students.

http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

monitor

71

Kotahitanga – teachers promote, monitor and ______________ on outcomes that in turn lead to improvements in educational achievement for Māori students.

http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

reflect

72

Kotahitanga – teachers ___________________ on outcomes that in turn lead to improvements in educational achievement for Māori students.

http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

promote, monitor and reflect

73

Kotahitanga – teachers promote, monitor and reflect ______________ that in turn lead to improvements in educational achievement for Māori students.

http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

on outcomes

74

Kotahitanga – teachers _________________________ that in turn lead to improvements in educational achievement for Māori students.

http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

promote, monitor and reflect on outcomes

75

Kotahitanga – teachers promote, monitor and reflect on outcomes that in turn ________________ in educational achievement for Māori students.


http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

lead to improvements

76

Kotahitanga – teachers promote, monitor and reflect on outcomes that in turn lead to improvements in ___________________ for Māori students.


http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

in educational achievement

77

Kotahitanga – teachers promote, monitor and reflect on outcomes that in turn lead to improvements in educational achievement __________________.

http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

for Māori students

78

Kotahitanga – teachers promote, monitor and reflect on outcomes that in turn ___________________________ for Māori students.

http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

lead to improvements in educational achievement

79

Kotahitanga – teachers promote, monitor and reflect on outcomes that in turn ________________________________.

http://tekotahitanga.tki.org.nz/About/The-Development-of-Te-Kotahitanga/Effective-Teaching-Profile

lead to improvements in educational achievement for Māori students

80

____________ means unity, and ______________ movements aim to unify Māori on non-tribal grounds. Some have been religious, while others focused on political power, protest or social issues.

Kotahitanga

81

Kotahitanga means ______, and Kotahitanga movements aim to unify Māori on non-tribal grounds. Some have been religious, while others focused on political power, protest or social issues.

https://teara.govt.nz/en/kotahitanga-unity-movements

unity

82

Kotahitanga means unity, and ______________ aim to unify Māori on non-tribal grounds. Some have been religious, while others focused on political power, protest or social issues.

https://teara.govt.nz/en/kotahitanga-unity-movements

Kotahitanga movements

83

Kotahitanga means unity, and Kotahitanga movements ___________ on non-tribal grounds. Some have been religious, while others focused on political power, protest or social issues.

https://teara.govt.nz/en/kotahitanga-unity-movements

aim to unify Māori

84

Kotahitanga means unity, and Kotahitanga movements aim to unify Māori on ____________. Some have been religious, while others focused on political power, protest or social issues.

https://teara.govt.nz/en/kotahitanga-unity-movements

on non-tribal grounds

85

Success for all has a whakatauki - Mā te huruhuru te manu ka rere - which references the feathers woven inside a whatu pōkeka or baby blanket – what does whakatauki mean here?

Proverb

86

What does Mā te huruhuru te manu ka rere mean?

“With the feathers of knowledge the bird will fly” - - which references the feathers woven inside a whatu pōkeka or baby blanket - reference to the concept of success for all in education.

87

How do you say “With the feathers of knowledge the bird will fly” in Te Reo?

Mā te huruhuru te manu ka rere

88

What whakatauki references the idea of education for all?

Mā te huruhuru te manu ka rere - “With the feathers of knowledge the bird will fly”

89

What does te whatu pōkeka mean in English?

Baby blanket

90

What is “baby blanket” in Te Reo?

te whatu pōkeka

91

What does Korowai (Te Reo) mean in English?

Maori cloak

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What is Te Reo for cloak?

Korowai