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Flashcards in Theme 1 Deck (30)
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1
Q

short term effects of 1832

A
  • middle class can vote
  • 1/5 adult men can vote
  • 56 rotten/ pocket boroughs disenfranchised
  • 22 new two member boroughs created
  • london and north still under represented
2
Q

Long term effects of 1832

A
  • fewer pocket boroughs reduces influence of lords
  • increase in contested elections
  • reduces influence of crown
  • corruption and bribery continue
  • landed interests still dominate parliament ( increase in county seats)
3
Q

short term effects of 1858

A
  • Edward Glover as scapegoat

- Liberals abolish property qualification

4
Q

long term effects of 1858

A

largely irrelevant

Half of MPs had claimed property that was not theirs anyway

5
Q

short term effects of 1867

A
  • household franchise (1/3 of adult males)
  • w/c dominate borough electorate, which had grown 134%
  • electorate remained solidly m/c in counties
  • consider those who could not vote
  • 45 seats taken from boroughs. 25 seats given to counties.
  • over representation continued in south east
6
Q

long term effects of 1867

A
  • more contested seats
  • party organisation develops (paid local agents)
  • social composition of MPs changed little. Landed interests still dominate in counties.
7
Q

long term effects of 1872

A

system more representative and democratic

8
Q

short term effects of 1872

A

treating and buying votes continued

employers in urban areas continue to influence workers

9
Q

short term effects of 1883

A

limits expenditure and prohibited bribery

10
Q

long term effects of 1883

A

worked: 18s8d in 1880 to 3s4d in 1910

but MPs still not paid, so 20% of elections still uncontested

11
Q

Short term effects of 1884

A
  • household suffrage and lodger franchise extended to counties
  • agricultural labourers and miners in counties can now vote
  • 2.5m new voters
  • 2/3 adult males can now vote
  • those with less than a year residency or living with parents still can’t vote
  • redistribution of rural seats
12
Q

long term effects of 1884

A
  • decline of aristocratic influence sped up
  • 1885: manufacturers dominate HoC for first time
  • complexities of registration disenfranchised many
  • plural voting - 500,000 in 1911
13
Q

short term effects of 1885

A
  • 150 seats redistributed to more densely populated counties e.g. Yorkshire
  • nearly all constituencies single member with similar populations
  • London MPs increase 22 to 59
  • London still under represented and Ireland over represented
14
Q

short term effects of 1911

A
  • salaries for MPs introduced
  • max term for parliament from 7 down to 5 years
  • HoL can not reject or amend money bills
  • HoL can only delay legislation for up to 2 years
15
Q

long term effects of 1911

A
  • commons can over rule lords in some instances
  • Lords powers significantly reduced
  • Bonar - Law was m/c
  • w/c men could become MPs ( growth of labour )
16
Q

short term effects of 1918

A
  • men over 21 can vote
  • women over 30 can vote (and become MPs)
  • 7.7m voters in 1910 –> 21.4m in 1918
  • 70,000 population established as key unit for 1 member constituencies
  • m/c seats rose from 48 to 200
17
Q

long term effects of 1918

A
  • returning officers paid from public funds (elections less expensive)
  • boost for labour (1924 = first gov)
  • concession to conservatives, 30,000 plural voters
  • complexities of registration disenfranchised c.7% men
18
Q

short term effects of 1928

A
  • women over 21 can vote in general elections

- 5m new voters

19
Q

political expediency in 1832

A
  • Whig Grey forms new ministry after collapse of Tories
  • had been in opposition since 1807, so wanted to create m/c voters
  • Removed rotten and pocket boroughs that had benefited Tories
  • reforming to preserve aristocratic gov
20
Q

political expediency in 1867

A
  • shift in conservative attitude ( might as well take credit for reform if it is inevitable)
  • Conservatives felt 1832 had favored boroughs, where their appeal was weakest
  • personal hatred of Gladstone
  • accepts Hodgkinson’s amendment without consulting party (500,000 voters)
  • Redistribution bill to keep counties as rural and conservative as possible
21
Q

political expediency in 1872

A
  • Radicals felt it would get them more of the vote
  • -> Bright’s price for staying in Gladstone’s cabinet
  • Liberals’ committment to reform
22
Q

political expediency in 1884

A
  • Gladstone wanted to restore his popularity

- Salisbury wanted redistribution bill to counter franchise extension

23
Q

political expediency in 1885

A
  • Salisbury and Villa Toryism

- -> Price for conservatices supporting the liberals

24
Q

political expediency in 1911

A
  • 1909 election : peers vs people

- -> liberal victory

25
Q

political expediency in 1918

A

Lloyd George and Asquith support votes for women

26
Q

pressure from below in 1832

A
  • radicalism
  • 1831 widespread riots (Nottingham and Derby)
  • Atwood’s BPU
  • Days of may 1932
27
Q

pressure from below in 1867

A
  • population growth
  • growing urban areas
  • Hyde Park 1866 violence
  • Economy declined dramatically in 1866
28
Q

pressure from below in 1872

A
  • misconduct of 1868 election widely reported in press
29
Q

pressure from below in 1911

A
  • Lords careful not to block any measures that have popular support e.g. pensions
30
Q

pressure from below in 1918

A

women in ww1
workers militancy
suffrage activity