Unit 1 "Finding Common Ground" Test Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Unit 1 "Finding Common Ground" Test Deck (16):
1

Aphorism

A pithy observation that contains a general truth
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

2

Authors purpose

The reason why an author writes something. Usually to express thoughts, feelings, to inform or explain, persuade, or to entertain.

3

Denotation

A word's literal or dictionary meaning

4

Dialogue

A written conversation between two or more characters. Writers use dialogue to bring characters to life, and to give reader insight into their qualities, traits, and reactions to other characters

5

Evidence

Facts or information indicating whether a belief or position is true or valid.

6

Frame Story

Exists within a narrative story, or frame and creates a story within a story.

7

Inference

A logical assumption that is based off observed facts and one's own knowledge and experience.

8

Irony

A special contrast between appearance and reality-usually one in which reality is the opposite of what it seems.

9

Metaphor

A figure of speech that makes a comparison between two things that are basically unlike, but have something in common.

10

Parallel Structure (Parallelism)

The use of similar grammatical constructions to express ideas that are related or equal in importance.

11

Rhetorical Devices

Techniques used by writers to enhance their work. These include analogy, parallelism, rhetorical questions, and repetition.

12

Sensory Language

Words and phrases that appeal to the senses of sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste.

13

Speaker

The voice that "talks" to the reader, similar to the narrator in fiction.

14

Speech

A talk or public address. The purpose may be to entertain, explain, present a claim, to inspire, or any combination of these.

15

Theme

An underlying message about life or human nature that a writer wants a reader to understand.

16

Argument

A speech or writing that presents a claim about an issue or problem and supports it with reasons and evidence. An argument recognizes the opposing side, anticipates and answers objections.