Vertigo Flashcards Preview

Year 3 - GP Block > Vertigo > Flashcards

Flashcards in Vertigo Deck (25):
1

What are the main causes of vertigo?

Herpes zoster

Acoustic neuroma

Ménière’s

Benign positional vertigo

Ototoxicity

Acute labyrinthitis

Trauma

2

What type of herpes zoster infection can cause vertigo?

Ramsay-Hunt syndrome

3

What other symptoms present in Ramsay-Hunt syndrome?

Ipsilateral facial paralysis

Ear pain/hearing loss

Lacrimation

Tinnitus

Vesicles in pinna

4

What cranial nerves can be affected by herpes zoster in Ramsay-Hunt syndrome?

V

VII

VIII

IX

5

What is the definition of vertigo?

Hallucination of movement, often rotatory (of the patient or their surroundings)

6

What other types of movement can be experienced with vertigo?

Tilting/sinking/rising of the floor

7

What other types of ‘dizziness’ is it important to distinguish vertigo from.

Light headedness/faintness

Loss of awareness

‘Vertigo’ with abnormal symptoms

8

What can cause light headedness/faintness?

Hypotension

Anaemia

Anxiety

9

What can cause loss of awareness?

Epilepsy

Syncope

10

What symptoms can accompany vertigo?

Tinnitus

Hearing loss

Pallor

Sweating

Nausea and vomiting

Difficulty walking/standing

Relief on lying/sitting still

11

What can cause vertigo with accompanying tinnitus and hearing loss?

Labyrinthitis

Ménière’s

Acoustic neuroma

Ramsay-Hunt syndrome

12

When does benign positional vertigo occur?

When moving

13

Why does BPV occur when moving?

Due to the moving of debris in the semi-circular canals of the ear

14

How does acute labyrinthitis typically present?

Abrupt onset vertigo, N+V, +/- prostration

15

What can cause acute labyrinthitis?

Viral infection

Vascular lesion

16

How is acute labyrinthitis treated?

Reassure the patient it will clear on its own

17

How long does it take for the severe vertigo experience in acute labyrinthitis to subside?

A number of days

18

How long can it take for a patient to fully recover from acute labyrinthitis?

Weeks

19

How does Ménière’s disease present?

Fluctuating hearing loss and attacks of vertigo lasting >20 minutes

20

What causes vertigo in Ménière’s disease?

Increased pressure in the endolymphatic system of the ear

21

What are some drugs that can cause ototoxicity?

Cisplatin

Loop diuretics

Aminoglycosides

22

What is a better description of an acoustic neuroma?

Vestibular schwannoma

23

What signs can an acoustic neuroma cause later on?

Signs of raised ICP

24

How does an acoustic neuroma typically present early on?

Unilateral hearing loss followed by vertigo

25

Trauma to which regions can result in vertigo?

Cerebello-pontine angle

Temporal bone