What is out there Flashcards Preview

Biology 101 > What is out there > Flashcards

Flashcards in What is out there Deck (30):
1

Among the proteobacteria are these bacteria are interesting gliding bacteria that produce “fruiting bodies” under conditions of starvation. They also glide along surfaces due to a polysaccharide slime

Myxobacteria

2

Type of bacteria among the ancestors of the mitochondria, Rhizobium in plant roots, and rickettsias pathogens in cells of animals

Proteobacteria

3

These are among the most distinctive bacteria
they move by a spiraling corkscrew motion.
They can be free living or parasitic.
Syphilis and Lyme’s disease are caused by them

Spirochetes

4

Although we know very little about them, the these are some of the most abundant, and important, organisms on the planet.
The group is very ancient-some bear a striking resemblance to fossils dated at more than two billion years old and many exploit ecological niches that were probably more important billions of years ago. Though the majority live in ordinary habitats, the group includes many extremophiles.

Archea

5

The ancestor of this cell type was probably an amalgam of prokaryote species, and possibly a viral component as well.

Eukaryote

6

There are about how many eukaryote kingdoms that include groups formerly classified as protists, like diplomonads and parabasalids

Eukaryotes

7

eukaryotes that are unicellular for most of their life cycle.

Protists

8

Several groups have independently acquired photosynthesis, and become “algae”, others have evolved multicellularity into animals, fungi, and slime molds.

Protists

9

These are a kingdom of organisms that includes decomposers, parasites, and mutualisms.


Fungi

10

Four major groups of fungi

Chrytridomycots
Zygomycots
Ascomycots
Basidiomycots

11

This group includes the green plants and the basal “bush” from which they originated. They have chlorophyls a and b, as well as certain other distinguishing characteristics.
Green Algae-Chlorophytes
Charophytes
Plants

Viridiplantae

12

These include several groups of multicellular, terrestrial photosynthesizers, including
Bryophytes-mosses, etc.
Pteridophytes-ferns.
Gymnosperms
Angiosperms-flowering plants

True Plants

13

How many present day animal phyla are there?

About 30

14

Concept that encompasses the genetic diversity within populations, the number of species or lineages, and communities and ecosystems

Biodiversity

15

Number of species in a given habitat

Alpha diversity

16

Accounts for the diversity of habitats and the change in species from one habitat to the next

Beta Diversity

17

Considers the total number of species

Gamma diversity

18

How does pollination demonstrate that ecology and evolution are closely aligned

Pollination syndromes that many taxa match
They evolve in disparate types of plants, and pollinators exploit these syndromes

19

A flower evolving longer corolla to ensure pollination and the subsequent evolution of longer hawkmoth tongues is an example of

Coevolution

20

The competition of among plants for pollinators, and therefore specialization to match those pollinators represents what in terms of ecology and evolution?

Ecology

21

Peponapis pruinosa (squash bees) and it's flower are an example of the ecological aspects of evolution

Woo!

22

open flowers, easy to reach pollen, accessible nectaries. Large amounts of pollen because most of the visitors are after pollen. Usually early spring.

Flies and generalists

23

moderately long corollas, flowers are white, blue, yellow, infrared, small amounts of sucrose-concentrated nectar, sometimes a “landing pad” for bees, and sometimes petals that must be pushed apart for the bee to reach the nectar. Scented flowers, open in daytime. Sticky pollen that bees can easily collect and transport, nectar guides.

Long tongued Bees

24

white, yellow, infrared flowers, short corollas with easily available pollen, no special tricks with petals, but usually asymmetric. Scented flowers open in daytime. Sticky pollen. Sucrose-dominated nectar in variable amounts.

Short Tongued Bees

25

as with long-tongued bee flowers, but bee must hang upside and buzz to release pollen.

Bumblebees

26

very long corollas that effectively force the moth to push its face into the stamens in order to reach reward (moths are not after pollen, so they must be tricked into transporting it), white flowers that are heavily scented and open at night, small amounts of concentrated nectar

Hawkmoths

27

Same as hawkmoths, but flowers run more to the pink or lavender and have a landing platform

Butterflies

28

red flowers (only vertebrates see that color well) with very long corollas and large amounts of dilute nectar, flowers open in daytime, and bird is forced to push face into stamens in order to feed. No scent

Hummingbirds

29

large amounts of dusty pollen that will stick to mammal hairs, very big flowers that bats can reach into with their faces, open at night,

Bats

30

flowers smell like carrion and offer large amounts of pollen

Beetles