2.2.4. Dermatopathology Lab Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 2.2.4. Dermatopathology Lab Deck (13)
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Eczematous Dermatitis

Heterogenous group of pruritic inflammatory disorders

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Etiology of Eczematous Dematitis

1. Infection
2. Chemicals (contact dermatitis)
3. Atopy (allergy)

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Type IV cell-mediated Eczematous dermatitis

Chemicals act as antigens, resulting from cooperation of skin macrophages (Langerhans cells) and helper T lymphocytes

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Morphologic findings of Eczematous dermatitis

Acute stage: spongiosis (intercellular edema) with vesicle formation

Chronic stage: acanthosis, hyperkeratosis, and lichenification

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Neurodermatitis (lichen simplex chronicus)

This lesion is clinically indistinguishable from chronic eczematous dermatitis. It produces anatomic changes entirely secondary to scratching (the cause of the pruritus is unknown but may be psychogenic)

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Psoriatic arthritis

Severe destructive rheumatoid arthritis-like lesions that commonly affect the fingers (associated with Psoriasis that has autoimmune etiology)

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Hyperkeratosis

Increased thickness of the stratum corneum

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Parakeratosis

Hyperkeratosis with retention of nuclei of keratinocytes

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Spongiosis

Epidermal intercellular edema with widening of intercellular space

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Acanthosis

Thickening of the epidermis

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Acantholysis

Separation of epidermal cells, one from the other; cells appear to float within extracellular space

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Lichenification

Accentuation of skin markings caused by scratching

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Acrochordon

AKA fibroepithelial polyp, skin tag

Extremely common lesion that occurs most often on the face near the eyelids, neck, trunk, or axilla. It consists of a central connective tissue core covered by stratified squamous epithelium