8.8 Summary Notes - The Standsrd Model Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 8.8 Summary Notes - The Standsrd Model Deck (15)
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1
Q

What is the standard model?

A

An attempt to organize the hundreds of different subatomic particles. It reduces the hundreds of seemingly different particles to a few fundamental particles and describes the interactions (forces between them). The standard model postulated three classes of particles: quarks, leptons, and bosons.

2
Q

Quarks

A

Relatively heavy particles that have fractional charges. (Less than the elementary charge). They cannot be isolated.

3
Q

What makes up protons and neutrons?

A

Combinations of quark.

4
Q

What quarks make up a proton?

A

Up, up, down

5
Q

What quarks make up a neutron?

A

Up, down, down

6
Q

Leptons

A

Much lighter particles than quarks (have mass but no internal structure)

~ electrons and neutrinos

7
Q

Bosons

A

Particles that are exchanged between quarks and leptons to produce the fundamental forces.

~ protons

8
Q

Strong force definition and range

A

The force that holds the nucleus together. Nuclear sizes.

9
Q

Electromagnetic force definition and range.

A

The force of attraction or repulsion between charged particles. Infinite

10
Q

Weak force definition and range.

A

The force that allows the transmutation of quarks; involved in radioactive decay. Nuclear sizes

11
Q

Gravity force definition and range.

A

The force responsible for the attraction of two masses. Infinite

12
Q

What is the order of relative strength from strongest to weakest.

A

Strong, electromagnetic, weak, gravity

13
Q

What are all the conservation laws that subatomic interactions obey in nuclear decay and high energy collisions?

A

Momentum, charge, mass-energy, nucleon number (atomic mass)

14
Q

Marat Gell-Mann

A

Built the system of fundamental particles

15
Q

Mesons

A

Unstable particles made of first generation quark-antiquark pairs that are lighter than neutrons and protons.