Act 3 Flashcards Preview

Romeo and Juliet > Act 3 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Act 3 Deck (35)
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1

hypocrites; deceivers

dissemblers

2

separate; apart

asunder

3

meeting place; hangout area

haunt

4

dead and rotting animal flesh

carrion

5

departing from; deviating from

digressing

6

a loose cloak or shawl, worn esp. by women

mantle

7

out and about; away from home

abroad

8

courage; bravery

valour

9

overly bright; gaudy

garish

10

fluent, articulate, and persuasive speech

eloquence

11

displaying romantic love or desire

amorous

12

to find fault with

chide

13

detests; hates

abhors

14

mirthful; cheerful; delightful

jocund

15

refrain from; avoid

forbear

16

exiled; deported

banished

17

expression of sorrow; grief

lamentation

18

unmanly; womanly

effeminate

19

conflict; bitter disagreement

strife

20

ordered; commanded

decreed

21

"Go, counsellor; ; Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain."

Juliet's conclusion following the Nurse's advice

22

a long, usually serious speech made by a character in a play (or other composition) while the speaker is alone - delivered to the audience in order to reveal the character's thoughts or give information that is essential for the audience to know

soliloquy

23

"I must be gone and live, or stay and die."

an example of simile

24

when the audience or reader understands the implication and meaning of a situation onstage (or in the work( and forsees the oncoming disaster or triumph, but the character(s) does not

dramatic irony

25

light mockery or teasing banter

persiflage

26

"Methinks I see thee, now thou art below, / As one dead in the bottom of the tomb."

Juliet's foreboding imagery

27

"He was born to shame: / Upon his brow shame is asham'd to sit; / For 'tis a throne where honour may be crown'd / sole monarch of the universal earth."

Juliet's conclusion about her fears

28

deliberate understatement for effect

litotes

29

"I do protest I never injur'd thee, / But love thee better than though canst devise / Till thou shalt know the reason of my love; / And so, good Capulet - which name I tender / As dearly as mine own - be satisfied."

Romeo's unexpected declaration

30

A figure of speech in which incongruous or contradictory terms are combined - as in the name of the term itself, which literally means "sharp dullness"

oxymoron