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Flashcards in Ageing Well or Not So Well Deck (62)
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1

What is homeostatic reverse?

The ability of an organism to stabilise its normal internal environment

2

How does homeostatic reverse change with age?

Gets worse

3

Do diseases always present the same in the elderly as they would in younger people?

They can present differently

4

Are normal ranges, such as peak flow rate, affected by age?

Yes they are

5

Is drug handling affected by age?

Yes it is altered

6

What are treatable diseases in the elderly often ascribed to?

'Normal ageing'

7

What is ageism?

Process of systemic stereotyping and discrimination against people just because they are old

8

Is the number of elderly people in the world expected to rise or decline?

Rise massively

9

What are the biggest killers in the worlds poorest countries?

Heart disease

Stroke

Chronic lung disease

10

Compare and contrast the population distribution of developed and developing regions?

In more developed regions:

  • Proportions of older persons (60 and older) increasing and proportions of young people (younger than 15) if falling
  • Lower levels of fertility
  • Mortality increasing in older population

In less developed regions:

  • Smaller proportion of population is elderly compared to more developed regions
  • But pace of population ageing is much faster in developing countries than developed countries so they will have less time to adjust to the consequences of population ageing
  • Population ageing also taking place at much lower levels of socio-economic development than it would in developed countries

 

11

In more developed regions, are the proportions of older people and younger people increasing or decreasing?

Older people - increasing

Younger people - decreasing

12

Are more developed regions getting higher or lower leveils of fertility?

Lower

13

By 2050, how is the population expected to change in more developed regions?

By 2050 number of older people in the world expected to exceed younger people, this is due to:

  • Decreasing fertility
  • Decreasing premature morality
    • Due to migration, health education programmes such as those relating to AIDs, malaria prevention, improvements in public health in relation to house, clean water, nutrition

14

Why is the number of older people in the world expected to exceed younger people by 2050?

  • Decreasing fertility
  • Decreasing premature morality
    • Due to migration, health education programmes such as those relating to AIDs, malaria prevention, improvements in public health in relation to house, clean water, nutrition

15

What is causing decreasing premature mortaility?

  • Due to migration, health education programmes such as those relating to AIDs, malaria prevention, improvements in public health in relation to house, clean water, nutrition

16

How does the proportion of the population being elderly in less developed countries compared to more developed ones?

  • Smaller proportion of population is elderly compared to more developed regions

17

Is the pace of the population ageing faster in developed or less developed countries?

Less developed countries so have less time to adjust to the consequences of population ageing

18

How is the population changing in Scotland?

  • People are living longer
  • More over 50s are living alone, woman being more likely too but the number of men living alone is increasing faster as mens life expectancy increases

19

What is the large projected rise in older people in Scotland due to?

  • ‘Baby boomers’ after WW2 entering their 80s by 2031
  • Overall mortality rates are expected to continue to improve
  • Older people are increasingly healthy

20

What impacts will the ageing population have?

  • Health
    • Increased numbers of geriaticians and health professionals invovled in care of the eldery required
    • Increased facilities for elderly health care required
    • Care of many long term conditions (such as diabetes, CVD, neurological conditions, renal disease) is moving from secondary care to primary/community care. End stage of these diseases requires as much palliative care as cancer, and prevalence of such diseases will increase as the population ages
    • Specific health promotion campaigns aimed at the eldery
  • Social
    • As population ages they will be increasingly dependent on families and/or carers who are also ageing
    • Demand for home carers and nursing home places is likely to increase
    • Within local communities will be increasing emphasis on providing social activites for the eldery
    • Role of elderly as grandparents and carers of grandchildren is likely to change
    • Housing demands are likely to change as more elderly people live alone
  • Economic
    • Retirement/pension age is already increasing
    • Finding employment may become harder for younh people as older people being required to work for longer
    • Proportionately less people will be paying into tax and pension funds, making it increasingly difficult to obtain an adequate return from pension funds
    • Those elderly who have not contributed to a private pension fund may find that state pension is inadequate, resulting in poverty
    • Increasing cost of ‘free personal care for the elderly’ policy in Scotland
  • Political
    • Current decision making and workforce planning must take into account of the ageing population

Increasing elderly population will potentially have the power to influence political decision making in relation to their specific concerns

21

What are the different categories of things an ageing population will impact?

Health

Social

Economic

Political

22

What are impacts of an ageing population on health?

  • Increased numbers of geriaticians and health professionals invovled in care of the eldery required
  • Increased facilities for elderly health care required
  • Care of many long term conditions (such as diabetes, CVD, neurological conditions, renal disease) is moving from secondary care to primary/community care. End stage of these diseases requires as much palliative care as cancer, and prevalence of such diseases will increase as the population ages
  • Specific health promotion campaigns aimed at the eldery

23

What are social impacts of an ageing population?

  • As population ages they will be increasingly dependent on families and/or carers who are also ageing
  • Demand for home carers and nursing home places is likely to increase
  • Within local communities will be increasing emphasis on providing social activites for the eldery
  • Role of elderly as grandparents and carers of grandchildren is likely to change
  • Housing demands are likely to change as more elderly people live alone

24

What are economic impacts of an ageing population?

  • Retirement/pension age is already increasing
  • Finding employment may become harder for younh people as older people being required to work for longer
  • Proportionately less people will be paying into tax and pension funds, making it increasingly difficult to obtain an adequate return from pension funds
  • Those elderly who have not contributed to a private pension fund may find that state pension is inadequate, resulting in poverty
  • Increasing cost of ‘free personal care for the elderly’ policy in Scotland

25

What are political impacts of an ageing population?

  • Current decision making and workforce planning must take into account of the ageing population
  • Increasing elderly population will potentially have the power to influence political decision making in relation to their specific concerns

26

How does the average age very within countries?

Can differ from region to region, such as the Highlands have a greater ageing population than Edinburgh

27

Are births and deaths increasing or decreasing in Scotland?

Births - decreasing

Deaths - increasing

28

How does female life expectancy compare to males?

Female's are 3.6 years greater, but male life expectancy is increasing faster than female

29

Are rises in life expectancy increasing or starting to slow?

Some studies suggest they are starting to slow

Maybe due to austerity changes

30

What does austerity changes mean?

Difficut economic conditions created by government measures to reduce public expenditure