CARL ROGER’S – PERSON CENTRED COUNSELLING Flashcards Preview

Counselling Individuals And Families 3020HSV > CARL ROGER’S – PERSON CENTRED COUNSELLING > Flashcards

Flashcards in CARL ROGER’S – PERSON CENTRED COUNSELLING Deck (10)
Loading flashcards...
1

• PCC is underpinned by

• humanistic thought

2

• Humanism asserts that people are

• capable and have the capacity to work through difficulties and can draw on their own resources to solve their problems. Humanism places humans as central and as valuable.

3

• PCC is also referred to as the

•humanistic or phenomenological approach

4

• PC Clinicians work with the client to build

• relationships that promote the client’s self-esteem and encourage the client to draw on their own strengths and inner capacity to change.

5

• Central to the approach is the belief

• f in the dignity and worth of the individual, including the individual’s capacity to grow.

6

• Rogers believed that those individuals who manifested behaviours that were inconsistent with the ideals of human potential

• probably did not receive the acceptance and affirmation that people need to experience self-actualisation.

7

Rogers believed in the concept of the fully functioning person as

openness to experience,
having a sense of meaning
purpose and trust in one’s self and others.

8

Goals are an important part of the therapeutic process – goals include

• Bringing about in the client a greater degree of independence and integration.
• A focus on the person, not on the presenting problem.
• Facilitating the client’s growth and self-actualisation (Corey, 1996).
• Therapeutic alliance is critical – essential to an understanding of the client’s reality.




.

9

Conditions for Therapy Include:


Genuineness.
• Congruence.
• Immediacy.
• Acceptance – unconditional positive regard.
• Accurate empathic understanding – ‘being’ with another.
• Non-directiveness and intuitiveness.

10

Limitations of PCC

• Considered too simplistic.
• Is limited to techniques of attending and reflection.
• Concern with the undirected approach that may lead to meaningless client ‘rambling’.
• Over-emphasis on the client as a person with a limited focus on problem solving techniques.
• Some clients may not have the potential to grow or to trust their own inner directions.
• Discounts the counsellor’s authority to direct the client.

• Considered too simplistic.
• Is limited to techniques of attending and reflection.
• Concern with the undirected approach that may lead to meaningless client ‘rambling’.
• Over-emphasis on the client as a person with a limited focus on problem solving techniques.
• Some clients may not have the potential to grow or to trust their own inner directions.
• Discounts the counsellor’s authority to direct the client.