Ch. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & 7 Flashcards Preview

Persuasion > Ch. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & 7 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Ch. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & 7 Deck (83)
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1

4 essential elements of the SMCR model

Source - the encoder of the message. Message - meant to convey the sources meaning. Channel - which carries the message. Receiver - who decodes the message.

2

Five canons of rhetoric (IASMD)

- Invention: Finding ways to persuade.
- Arrangement: Putting together the structure of a coherent argument.
- Style: Presenting the argument to stir the emotions.
- Memory: Speaking without having to prepare or memorize a speech.
- Delivery: Making effective use of voice, gesture, etc.

3

6 strategies of the intensify/downplay model, also called Ranks models. (RAC ODC)

Intensification - Repetition, Association, Composition.
Downplaying - Omission, Diverson, Confusion.

4

ELM

The elaboration-likelihood model

5

ELM two main routes

Central information processing route - receiver consciencely and directly focuses on the persuasive communication.

Peripheral information processing route - the information may be processed almost instantly or just by the senses.
Ex : Music playing

6

Rhetoric

What moves people

7

Aristotle's definition of rhetoric

Ethos, logos, pathos.

8

Ethos, logos, pathos

E - Sources credibility.
L - the idea of using logical or rational appeals.
P - the use of the emotional appeals.

9

Common ground

Aristotle also thought that persuasion is most effective when based on the common ground, or the shared beliefs, values, experiences, and interest existing between persuaders and persuadees.

10

Cultural diversity

We need to make sure that the action we suggest in our persuasion takes into account that some cultures place a much higher value on some characteristics, circumstances, or morals, then do others.

11

Doublespeak

Deliberate miscommunication and the American Heritage dictionary defines as "evasive"
Ex : "revenue enhancement", really is "tax increase"

12

Enthymemes

A form of argument in which the first or major premise in the proof remains unstated by the persuader and, instead, is supplied by the audience

13

Ethos

First, persuasion dependent on a sources credibility, or ethos, which is why the testimonial is such an effective persuasive tactic in much advertising

14

TRA

Theory of reasoned action

15

Theory of reasoned action

Solve the especially difficult problem of finding significant attitude-behavior relationships

16

Central feature of theory of reasoned action

Behavioral intention ----------> Likelihood of actual behavior

17

Responsibility

Includes the elements of fulfilling duties and obligations, of being accountable to other individuals and groups, of adhering to agreed-upon standards, and of being accountable to one's own conscious.

18

Persuasion

Persuasion consist of artistic and in artistic proofs. The persuader controls artistic proofs, such as the choice of evidence, the organization of the persuasion, style of delivery, and language choices.

In artistic proof, includes things not controlled by the speaker, such as the occasion, the time allotted to the speaker, or things that bound persons to certain action, such as undeniable facts or statistics.

19

Intensification - Repetition, Association, Composition.

- Repetition-slogans, jingles, recurring examples or themes.
- Association-linking a positive or negative valued idea to one's persuasive advice.
- Composition - graphic layout, design, typeface, and so on.

20

Downplaying - Omission, Diverson, Confusion.

- Omission - half truths, slanted or biased evidence.
- Diversion - shifting attention to bogus issues, and so on.
- Confusion - making things overly complex, using jargon, faulty logic, and so on.

21

5 major ethical perspectives

Human Nature.
Political.
Situational.
Legal.
Dialogical.

22

HPSLD

Human Nature.
Political.
Situational.
Legal.
Dialogical.

23

Human Nature.
Political.
Situational.
Legal.
Dialogical.

- Human Nature - probe the essence of human nature by asking what makes us fundamentally human.
- Political - the implicit or explicit values and procedures accepted as crucial to the health and growth of a particular system.
- Situational - to make ethical judgments from a situational perspective, it is necessary to focus regularly and primarily on the elements of the specific persuasive situation at hand.
- Legal -illegal communication behavior also is unethical, but that which is not specifically illegal is ethical.
- Dialogical - emerge from current scholarship on the nature of communication as the dialogue rather than as monologue.

24

Adaptation to the audience

Most persuaders seek to secure some kind of response from receivers. Persuaders must decide the ethical intermediate point between their own idea and it's pure form and that idea modified to achieve maximum impact with the audience.

25

Ethical issues

Focus on value judgments concerning degrees of right and wrong, virtue and vice, and ethical obligations in human conduct.

26

Freedom versus responsibility tension

Might occur when we, as individuals, carry to an extreme the now traditional view that the best test of the soundness of our ideas is their ability to survive in the free and open public "marketplace" of ideas.

27

Going viral

Describe the rumors, controversial statements, and provocative photos or videos that are quickly picked up, rapidly spread, and widely diffused through blogs, email, and social network media such as YouTube and Twitter.

28

The golden rule

Persons familiar with the Christian religious tradition may think that the golden rule is unique to that religion. One interpretation of the golden rule is that we should only do specific actions to others if we would allow them to do the same specific actions to us.

29

The platinum rule

Do unto others as they themselves would have done unto you.

30

5 of Kenneth Burke pentad (ASAAP)

- Act - what is going on.
- Scene - background.
- Agent - main person.
- Agency - how you get your message across.
- Purpose - why you did it.