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Flashcards in Ch 22 Deck (75)
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1

What does this:
Motor cortex (voluntary skeletal movement, fine repetitive motor movements), Executive functions (Phineas Gage story)

frontal lobe

2

What does this:
Processing of sensory data, tactile sensations, visual, gustatory, olfactory, auditory sensations, proprioception

parietal lobe

3

What does this:
primary vision center, interpretation of visual data

occipital lobe

4

What does this:
perception and interpretation of sounds, integration of taste, smell and balance

Temporal Lobe

5

What does this:
Refine motor movements

Basal Ganglia

6

What are the parts of the cerebrum?

frontal lobe
parietal lobe
occipital lobe
temporal lobe
basal ganglia

7

What does this:
■ Integration of voluntary movement, control of muscle tone, balance, posture and production of steady and precise movements
■ Integrates multiple inputs: Motor Cortex, Vestibular System, Sensory input from eyes, ears, touch, musculoskeletal system

Cerebellum

8

What does this:
Controls many involuntary functions see Table 22-1. Contains the nuclei of the 12 Cranial nerves.

Brainstem

9

What is the acronym for the cranial nerves?

ooo to touch and feel ariels glistening violin at home

olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, abduces, facial, acoustic, glossopharynngeal, vagus, spinal Accessory, hypoglossal

10

What are the two sensory tracts?

Dorsal posterior columns and spinothalamic tracts

11

What are the motor tracts?

lateral corticospinal tract,
rubrospinal tract,
reticulospinal
vestribulospinal tracts
anterior corticospinal

12

The spinal cord begins as it exits the (blank) and terminates around (blank)

skull
L1 and L2 vertebral column (important for lumbar punctures, spinal anesthesia).

13

What does this describe?
Nerve cell bodies, the butterfly-shaped center of the cord, consists of anterior and posterior horns (contain nerve cell bodies of autonomic and sensory neurons).

gray matter

14

What does this describe?
Nerve Tracts, ascending and descending
o Dorsal Column (ascending tracts called the fasiculus gracilis and fasciulus cuneatus) transmit Touch, vibration, and proprioception (TVP)
o Spinothalamic Tracts (ascending tracts) transmit Pain and Temperature (P&T)
o Corticospinal Tracts (Descending tracts) conduct signals of skilled, delicate, and purposeful movements.

White matter

15

What are the 1 column and the 2 tract of the white matter?

dorsal column, spinothalamic tracts, corticospinal tracts

16

What does this:
ascending tracts called the fasiculus gracilis and fasciulus cuneatus) transmit Touch, vibration, and proprioception (TVP)

dorsal column

17

What does this:
(ascending tracts) transmit Pain and Temperature (P&T)

spinothalamic tracts (ascending tracts)

18

What does this
(Descending tracts) conduct signals of skilled, delicate, and purposeful movements.

corticospinal tracts (descending tracts)

19

What is this important for?

○ Has this ever happened before, acute or insidious onset, what was the patient doing at the time of the event, worsening or improvement of symptoms, time of day, exact time of symptom onset, stresses, anxiety, depression, etc.

HPI (sequence of events leading up to complaint and thereafter

20

What are these important for:
sequence of events (aura, activities preceding event, loss of consciousness, fall, automatism, muscle tone, postictal behavior), relationship of seizure to day/activity/etc., frequency, medications

seizures

21

What are these important for:
loss of balance, falling in one direction, leg weakness, associated problems, rheumatoid arthritis, ataxia, stroke, seizure, arrhythmias, sensory changes, medications.

gait problems

22

What are these important for:
onset, character (generalized or specific area, transient or progressively ascending, proximal/distal extremities, unilateral/bilateral, hypersensitivity), associated symptoms (tingling, numbness, pain, spasms), concurrent chronic illness (HIV, nutritional/ vitamin deficiency), medications.

Weakness or parasthesia

23

(blank) is a sensation of tingling, tickling, prickling, pricking, or burning of a person's skin with no apparent long-term physical effect.

paresthesia

24

What is this important for:
acute/chronic, timing, associated disorders, EtOH, drugs, medications, associated symptoms such as hallucinations or delusions, trauma, fever/infection

Disorientation and confusion

25

What is this important for:
SIGECAPS to screen for depression, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Geriatric Depression Scale, etc, rule out suicidal or homicidal ideation.

Disorientation and Confusion

26

What is this important for:
Onset of memory loss (recent, chronic), worsening or progressive, types of things forgotten, ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL’s) , level of concern of patient and/or family members, screen for depression.

memory loss

27

What is this important for:
Onset (sudden or gradual), Character (worse with rest, intentional movement, anxiety), unilateral or bilateral, body location, interference with daily activities, associated problems (hyperthyroidism, familial tremor, alcohol consumption, multiple sclerosis), relieved by rest/activity/alcohol, medications.

Tremor

28

Who is this important for:
prenatal hx (mother’s health, meds, infections, exposures (TORCH), trauma, HTN, alcohol), birth hx (apgar score, fetal distress, birth weight), respiratory status at birth, neonatal health (jaundice, infection, seizures, poor coordination, congenital anomalies.

infants

29

Who is this important for:
developmental milestones, loss of previously achieved function, performance of self-care activities (dressing, feeding, toileting), health problems (headaches, seizures, clumsiness, progressive muscular weakness, inability to go up and down stairs).

Children

30

Who is this important for:
weeks of gestation, convulsions/ headache, h/o pregnancy induced hypertension, nutritional status.

pregnant women