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Flashcards in Class 2 Deck (25)
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1
Q

3 “I’s” Framework:

A

Interests: What actors want to achieve; preferences over outcomes

Interactions: Ways in which choices of 2+ actors combine to produce political outcomes

Institutions: Sets of rules that structure interactions

2
Q

3 “I’s” Poker Player Example

A
Interests: win hands, make money

Interactions: other players' betting and folding affects-- consequences of betting and folding

Institutions: the rules of poker
3
Q

3 “I’s” Framework “Choice of seminar” Example

A

Interests: have as much one-on-one time as possible with prof

Interactions: others choosing same seminar reduce its value

Institutions: NYU’s rules governing enrollment in seminars

4
Q

3 “I’s” Framework Example:

Choice of whether or not to sign a treaty

A

Interests: maintaining power internationally, holding on to elected office

Interactions: actions of other signatories and of fellow politicians affect the consequences of signing or not

Institutions: rules for electing and ousting the leader

5
Q

Mercantilism Era- World Politics dominated by European Politics

A

All that changed after 1492, as wave upon wave of explorers, conquerors, traders, and settlers went forth from Europe’s Atlantic nations. First Spain and Portugal, then England, France, and the Netherlands sent soldiers and traders all over the New World, Africa, and Asia in search of possessions and profi t. By 1700, the world was unquestionably controlled by western Europeans. They exercised direct rule over vast colonial possessions in the Western Hemisphere

-The world economy was dominated by Europe
- Ruling monarchies and their allies in the commercial classes benetted handsomely from markets abroad
- More territory
- Rare resources (precious metals, spices, tropical crops, etc.)
- Access to markets
- Imperial powers engaged in Mercantilism, the system of monopolistic control over trade and economic activity to benet the government and business elite.

6
Q

Pax Britannica: 1815-1914 (100 years of peace)

A

The major powers were far more interested than they had been in trading and investing worldwide, including with one another. Instead of imposing strict restraints on the movement of goods and money around the world, most governments welcomed ever- greater links among their economies. Their economic interactions became more cooperative as they pursued a common interest in global economic integration.

Pax Britannica “British Peace,” a century- long period beginning with Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo in 1815 and ending with the outbreak of World War I in 1914 during which Britain’s economic and diplomatic infl uence contributed to economic openness and relative peace.

7
Q

Balance of Power Becomes Unstable (Rise of Germany 1870-1900)

A

Germany becomes powerful very quickly
(In 30 years (1870-1900), overtakes Britain to become largest economy in Europe)

Germany sets sights on Europe, expansion feared by old powers

Two hostile camps form (Formation of ALLIES)

  1. Germany, Austria-Hungary, Ottoman Empire
  2. Brittain, France, Russia
8
Q

WWI (1914- 1918) and Aftermath

A

1. Tensions left unresolved
2. Economies shattered
3. United States becomes world power, offers loans (then turns isolationist)
4. Germany hit especially hard
5. Prices rose to a trillion times their pre-war levels
- Middle classes hit extremely hard, base for
extremist movements (By 1930 Nazis +
Fascist Allies controlled most of Europe +
Japan
7. Great depression hits in 1929

9
Q

WWII (1939-1945) Aftermath of WWII

A
  1. Decisive victory for allies: United States, Soviet Union, Great Britain and France
  2. Germany, Japan, Italy, France and Britain done as great powers
  3. Blocs coalesce around two superpowers: US and Soviet Union (Western vs Eastern bloc)
10
Q

“The Axis” Alliance

A

In 1940, the three major Fascist powers— Germany, Italy, and Japan— aimed at restoring and increasing their military might and territory, and in 1940 they formed a formal alliance– Leads to WWII

11
Q

Cold War (approx 1947–1991)

A
  • United States (market-based capitalism) v. Soviet Union (centrally-planned socialism)
  • By 1954, both have nuclear and atomic weapons
    - Arms Race
    - Prevent support of other side
    *US: Iran, Guatemala, Congo, Cuba, Domin. Repub, Chile, Nicaragua
    *Soviet Union: Hungary, Czechoslovakia
    *Proxy wars in Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan
12
Q

North Atlantic Treaty Organization ( NATO)

A

A military alliance created in 1949 to bring together many Western European nations, the United States, and Canada, forming the foundation of the American-led military bloc during the Cold War. Today, NATO’s role includes handling regional problems and developing a rapid reaction force.

13
Q

Post-Cold War

A

1. Globalization
2. Collective action through the UN
3. International institutions

14
Q

World Views a.k.a. The Three “ism’s”

A
  1. Realism
  2. Liberalism
  3. Constructivism
15
Q

Realism

A

States are dominant actors, interest in power, interests generally in conflict, anarchic international system with ineffective institutions, powerful states’ interests dominate

16
Q

Liberalism

A

Many actors are relevant, wealth is a key interest, common interests foster cooperation, international institutions produce cooperation

17
Q

Constructivism

A

Many actors are relevant, interests are shaped by culture and identity, interactions condition actors to have interests but they can change, institutions define appropriate behavior

18
Q

Warsaw Pact

A

Warsaw Pact A military alliance formed in 1955 to bring together the Soviet Union and its Cold War allies in Eastern Europe and elsewhere; dissolved on March 31, 1991, as the Cold War ended.

19
Q

World Views v. Theories

A

Committing to a world view constrains the questions we can ask and the answers we’ll get

20
Q

Why use Theory? 4 Things that it does

A
  1. Offers an explanation for a phenomenon that allows us to identify conditions under which a phenomenon is more or less likely to occur
  2. Aids description by identifying which factors are important and which are not
  3. Allows prediction by explaining how a change in one factor will lead to changes in behavior and outcomes
  4. Suggests policy responses by determining what must be changed in order to generate better outcomes
21
Q

Falsifying Theory

A

Single cases can falsify absolute theories. Single cases cannot falsify partial, probabilistic or general theories.

i.e. Saying All vs. Most
“Most Cows are black” - Here is a white cow
“All Cows are black”- Here is a white cow- Falsifies theory

22
Q

Levels of Analysis

Domestic, International, Transnational Levels

A

(Domestic, International, Transnational Levels)

23
Q

Domestic Level of Analysis

A

Subnational actors (members of government, bureaucrats, interest groups, voters, etc.)

24
Q

International Level of Analysis

A

States (representatives of states as a whole)

25
Q

Transnational Level of Analysis

A

Groups whose members span borders (multinational corporations, transnational advocacy groups, terrorist organizations, etc.)