Clinical: Cutaneous Reactions Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Clinical: Cutaneous Reactions Deck (31):
1

Pathogenesis of allergic contact dermatitis

Type IV hypersensitivity causing eczematous reaction in the skin to an allergen

2

Presentation of allergic contact dermatitis

Acute: vesicles, bullae
Subacute: microvesicles, erythema, scale
Chronic: lichenification, scaling, erythema

3

Unique pattern of allergic contact dermatitis caused by plants

Linear nature of vesicle distribution

4

4 most common shampoo allergens that cause allergic contact dermatitis

Cocamidylpropyl Betaine
Fragrance
Formaldehyde Releasers
MCI (Miss Chinese International pageant)

5

Diagnositc test for allergic contact dermatitis

Patch Test

6

Treatment for allergic contact dermatitis

Short Term topical corticosteroids
Antihistamines

7

Pathogenesis of Irritant Contact Dermatitis

Eczematous reaction secondary to exposure to a harsh product (alkali) or repeated exposure to a mild irritant (water)

8

Treatment for Irritant Contact Dermatitis

Avoid the irritant

9

Pathogenesis of Phytophotodermatitis

Reaction to furocoumarins in certain plants (limes). Reaction only occurs once the patient is exposed to UV light.
-erythema, edema, hyperpigmentation

10

Most common scenario for Morbilliform Drug Eruption

Patient with mono put on ampicillin has a drug reaction. Systemic pruritis and erythema.

11

Treatment for Morbilliform Drug Eruption

Topical steroids, systemic antihistamines
-remove offending medication

12

Pathogenesis of Drug Hypersensitivity Syndrome

AKA Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS)
-drug causing eosinophilic reaction in the body creating a rash and chance of internal organ (liver) inflammation
-can be a life threatening condition

13

How is DRESS different from Morbilliform eruption?

Morbilliform will have normal Liver Function Tests, no eosinophilia, lack of fever and lymphadenopathy

14

Pathogenesis of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)

Hypersensitivity reaction to drugs (or infections) leading to dermoepidemal junction cell death causing the epidermis to separate from the dermis

15

Treatment for Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

Corticosteroids early

16

Pathogenesis of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN)

Hypersensitivity reaction to drugs (or infections) leading to dermoepidemal junction cell death causing the epidermis to separate from the dermis

17

How are SJS and TEN different?

They are the exact same thing. SJS involves only about 10% of the skin. If more than 30% of the skin is involved the name changes to TEN.

18

What is a fixed drug eruption?

Annular, erythematous plaque that forms on the skin in the exact same spot every time a patient takes a certain medication.

19

Culprit in any Urticaria

Mast cells

20

Classification of Urticaria

Acute: occurring for less than 6 weeks
Chronic: occurring for more than 6 weeks, at least 2x a week
Episodic: occurring longer than 6 weeks but less than 2x a weeks

21

Most common known cause of Acute Urticaria

Upper Respiratory Tract infection (usually strep)

22

Treatment for Dermatographism

Antihistamines

23

Cause of Cholinergic Urticaria

Any activity that raises core body temperature
(also treat with antihistamines)

24

Most common cause of Solar Urticaria

UVA exposure

25

Rash pattern and cause of Erythema Multiforme

Targetoid Lesion
Most commonly caused by HSV

26

Rash pattern of Erythema Nodosum

Symmetric, tender, red nodules usually on anterior legs (type of septal panniculitis or SubQ fat inflammation)

27

Most common cause of erythema nodosum in children

Strep infection

28

Most common causes of erythema nodosum in adults

Infection
Drugs
Sarcoidosis
Autoimmune Diseases

29

What is the "id" reaction

AKA Autosensitization Dermatitis
A widespread eczematous reaction occurring secondary to a severe primary dermatitis

30

Most common cause of "id" reactions

Severe Stasis dermatitis

31

Most common cause of Chronic Autoimmune Urticaria

Patients have IgG Abs to the Fc portion of IgE