COM Study Guide Midterm Flashcards Preview

Term 1: COM 110 at Carrington > COM Study Guide Midterm > Flashcards

Flashcards in COM Study Guide Midterm Deck (67):
1

Active Perception

(Chapter 3, Page 61)

Perception that occurs because you seek out specific information through intentional observation and questioning.

2

Aggressive

(Chapter 6, Page 173)

Expressing in one's interests while denying the right of others by blaming, judging, and evaluating other people.

3

Androgynous Role

(Chapter 2, Page 39)

Gender role that includes both masculine and feminine qualities.

4

Asynchronous

(Chapter 1, Page 17)

A message that is not read, heard, or seen exactly when it is sent; there is a time delay between the sending of the message and its receipt.

EX: An email.

5

Bypassing

(Chapter 6, Page 157)

Confusion caused by the fact that the same word can mean different things to different people.

EX: W.C. - might mean "wayside chapel" to a Swiss person and "water closet" (bathroom) to a British person.

6

Communication

(Chapter 1, Page 3)

Process of acting on information.

7

* Communication Channels

(Chapter 1, Page 7)

Pathway through which messages are sent.

EX: Text Messaging, E-Mail, Phone, Video Conference, Facebook, or Twitter.

8

Concrete

(Chapter 6, 150-151)

"People call a word concrete if they can experience its referent with one of their senses; if you can see, touch, smell, taste, or hear a word's referent, then the word is concrete.

EX: Red Mercedes C-230, specific color and model of a car.

9

Connotative Meaning

Chapter 6, Page 150)

Personal and subjective association with a word.

EX: Mother: Personal, subjective association. A Mother is someone who is warm and caring OR a cold and distant woman who left you as a kid.

10

Context

(Chapter 1, Page 8)

Physical and psychological environment for communication.

11

Culture Shock

(Chapter 4, Page 96)

Feelings of stress and anxiety a person experiences when encountering a culture different from his or her own.

EX: A Japanese woman traveling in America.

12

Decoding

(Chapter 1, Page 7)

To interpret ideas, feelings, ad thoughts into code.

EX: Occurs when the receiver interprets the words or nonverbal cues.

13

Direct Perception

(Chapter 3, Page 79)

Asking for conformation from the observed person of an interpretation or a perception about him or her.

EX: "I get the feeling from your tone of voice and the way you're acting that you are kind of down and depressed. What's wrong?"

14

Emotional Contagion

(Chapter 1, Page 16)

The process whereby people mimic the emotions of others after watching and hearing their emotional expressions.

EX: Being positive and upbeat can have an impact on your emotions. In turn, your emotional expression can affect others.

15

Empathy

(Chapter 4, Page 108)

Emotional reaction that is similar to the reaction being experienced by another person; empathizing is feeling what another reason is feeling.

16

Enculturation

(Chapter 4, Page 91)

The process of transmitting a group's culture from one generation to the next.

EX: When your parents teach you how to eat with chopsticks.

17

Ethics

(Chapter 1, Page 26)

The belief, values, and moral principles by which a person determines what is right and wrong.

18

Ethnicity

(Chapter 4, Page 88)

Social classification based on nationality, religion, language, and ancestral heritage, shared by a group of people who also share a common geographical origin.

19

External Noise

(Chapter 5, Page 124)

"Distractions that take your focus away from the message. I.E. tv, computer games, music, magazine headlines, etc."

20

Gender Differences in Communication

(Chapter 4, Page 93)

Socially learned and reinforced characteristics that include one's biological sex and psychological characteristics (masculinity, femininity, androgyny).

21

Gender Differences in Communication:

- Masculine Culture

(Chapter 4, Page 93)

Culture in which people tend to value traditional roles for men and women, achievement, assertiveness, heroism, and material wealth.

22

Gender Differences in Communication:

- Feminine Culture

(Chapter 4, Page 93)

Culture in which people tend to value caring, sensitivity, and attention to quality of life.

23

Halo Effect

(Chapter 3, Page 68)

Attributing a variety of positive qualities to those you like.

EX: If you like me, then you will think I am considerate, warm, and caring.

24

Information Triage

(Chapter 5, Page 134)

Process of evaluating information to sort good information from less useful or less valid information.

25

Interpersonal Communication

(Chapter 1, Page 3)

A distinctive, transactional form of human communication involving mutual influence, usually for the purpose of managing relationships.

26

What are the five elements of the listening process?

(Chapter 5, Page 117)

Selecting, Attending, Understanding, Remembering, and Responding.

27

Listener:

Relational Listener

(Chapter 5, Page 119)

Those who prefer to focus on emotions and feelings communicated verbally and nonverbally by others.

28

Listener:

Analytical Listener

(Chapter 5, Page 119)

Those who withhold judgement, listen to all sides of an issue, and wait until they hear the facts before reaching a conclusion.

29

Listener:

Critical Listener

(Chapter 5, Page 120)

Those who prefer to listen for the facts and evidence to support key ideas and an underlying logic; they also listen for errors, inconsistencies, and discrepancies. Known to second-guess.

30

Listener:

Task-Orientated Listener

(Chapter 5, Page 120)

Those who look at the overall structure of the message to see what action needs to e taken; they also like efficient, clear, and briefer messages.

31

Listening

(Chapter 5, Page 117)

Process of selecting, attending to, creating meaning from, remembering, and responding to verbal and nonverbal messages.

32

Malapropism

(Chapter 6, Page 158)

Confusion of one word or phrase for another that sounds similar to it.

EX: Construction and Instruction; Subscription and Prescription.

33

Message


(Chapter 1, Page 7)

Written, spoken, and unspoken elements of communication to which people assign meaning.

34

Meta-Communication

(Chapter 1, Page 14)

Verbal or nonverbal communication about communication.

EX: "Reading between the lines."

35

Motivation

(Chapter 4, Page 102)

Internal state of readiness to respond to something.

36

Noise

(Chapter 1, Page 7)

Anything literal or psychological that interferes with accurate reception of a message.

37

Perception

(Chapter 3, Page 61)

Process of experiencing the world and making sense out of what you experience.

38

Passive Perception

(Chapter 3, Page 61)

Perception that occurs without conscious effort, simply in response to one's surroundings.

39

Personality

(Chapter 2, Page 39)

A set of enduring behavioral characteristics and internal responses influence their behavior.

40

Personality:

Big Five Personality Traits

(Chapter 2, Page 39)

Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism, and Openness

41

Polarization

(Chapter 6, Page 161)

Description and evaluation of what your observe in terms of extremes such as good or bad, old or new, beautiful or ugly.

EX: America: Love it or Leave it!

42

Remembering

(Chapter 5, Page 118)

Process of recalling information.

43

Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis

(Chapter 6, Page 154)

Based of the principles of linguistic determinism and linguistic relativity, the hypothesis the language shapes our thoughts and culture, and our culture and thoughts affect the language we use to describe our world.

44

Linguistic Determinism

(Chapter 6, Page 154)

Theory that describes how use of language determines or influences thoughts and perceptions.

45

Linguistic Relativity

(Chapter 6, Page 154)

Theory that each language Claude's some unique features that are not found in other languages.

46

Selecting

(Chapter 5, Page 117)

Process of choosing one sound while sorting through various sounds competing for your attention.

47

Selective Exposure

(Chapter 3, Page 62)

Tendency to put ourselves in situations that reinforce our attitudes, beliefs, values, or behaviors.

EX: Who attends a Democratic Party convention? Democrats.

48

Selective Recall

(Chapter 3, Page 62)

Process that occurs when we remember things we want to remember and forget or repress things that are unpleasant, uncomfortable, or unimportant to us.

EX: You do not remember the web address you visited yesterday.

49

Self-Awareness

(Chapter 2, Page 52)

A person's conscious understanding of who he or she is.

50

Self-Esteem

(Chapter 2, Page 41)

Your evaluation of your worth or value based on your perception of such things as your skills, abilities, talents, and appearance.

51

Self-Fulfilling Prophecy

(Chapter 2, Page 50)

Prediction about the future actions that is likely to come true because the person believes that it will come true.

52

Self-Serving Bias

(Chapter 3, Page 76)

Tendency to perceive our own behavior as more positive than others' behavior.

53

Self-Talk

(Chapter 2, Page 46)

Aka Interpersonal Communication. Communication with yourself.

EX: Tell yourself, "I can do this."

54

Self-Worth

(Chapter

...

55

Selective Perception

(Chapter 3, Page 62)

Process of seeing, hearing, or making sense of the world around us based on such factors as our personality, beliefs, attitudes, hopes, fears, and culture, as well as what we like and don't like.

56

Shy

(Chapter 2, Page 40)

A behavioral tendency not to talk or interact with others.

57

Social Information Processing Theory

(Chapter 1, Page 20)

Theory that suggests people can communicate relational and emotional messages via the Internet although such messages take longer to express without nonverbal cues.

58

Stereotyping

(Chapter 3, Page 72)

To place a person or group of persons into an inflexible, all-encompassing category.

59

Third Culture

(Chapter 4, Page 104)

Common ground established when people from separate cultures create a third, "new," more comprehensive and inclusive culture.

EX: One person celebrates Christmas, the other Hanukkah. They use two cultural traditions and make a new non traditional third culture.

60

Values

(Chapter 2, Page 31)

Enduring concept of good and bad, right and wrong.

61

BONUS QUESTION:

What is the process of communicating a group's culture from one generation to another called?

(In-Class Question)

Enculturation.

62

BONUS QUESTION:

According to research, about how much of their communication time do average college students spend listening?

(In-Class Question)

55%.

63

BONUS QUESTION:
Beth sends Julian an e-mail asking him to meet her at the bank at 2:30pm. When she gets to the bank, Julian doesn't arrive until 3:15pm. When she asks him why he is late, he replies, "I came as soon as I got your message." The problem they are encountering may stem from the fact that a message sent by e-mail can be:
(In-Class Question)

Asynchronous.

64

BONUS QUESTION:

During the late sixties and early seventies, you would see bumper stickers that said, "America: Love it or Leave it!" This sentiment expresses the language barrier of:

(In-Class Question)

Polarization.

65

BONUS QUESTION:

The theory that suggests that language shapes our culture and culture shapes our language is:

(In-Class Question)

The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis.

66

BONUS QUESTION:

When someone uses the word dog and you understand the word to mean "a Manny, dirty, and disgusting animal, like the one that bit you when you were five years old," which level of Meaning would you probably be applying?

(In-Class Question)

Connotative.

67

BONUS QUESTION:

A confusing of one word or phrase for another that sounds similar to it is known as a:

(In-Class Question)

BAFFLEGAB! Just kidding, it is malapropism.