Dermatology Flashcards Preview

Cancer, Skin & Infection > Dermatology > Flashcards

Flashcards in Dermatology Deck (38):
1

What are the risk factors for BCC?

Sun exposure
Fair skin
Xeroderma pigmentosum

2

What is the typical morphology of BCC?

Pink
Pearly
Papule / nodule
Talengetasia

3

Where on the body are BCCs found?

Face, head and neck

4

Which condition is a precursor to SCC?

Actinic Keratosis

5

What is the typical appearance of actinic keratosis?

Scaly plaques
Forehead / face
Rough gritty texture on touch

6

What are the risk factors for actinic keratosis?

Fair skin
Age
Family history
Sun exposure
Immunosuppression

7

What is the order of mortality for SCC, BCC and MM?

From highest mortality to lowest mortality

MM > SCC > BCC

8

What is the treatment for SCC?

Excision and desiccation

Alternatively: Radiation or 5-FU cream

9

How do you assess an acquired mole / melanoma?

ABCDE

- Asymmetry
- Borders
- Colour
- Diameter >6mm
- Evolving

Refer if more than 3

10

What are the features of MM?

Pigmented papules / plaues / nodules

May crust, bleed or erode

11

What are the risk factors for melanoma?

Family hx
Sun exposure
Tanning booth use
Fair skin/hair/eyes
Old age

12

What is the glascow 7 criteria for moles and melanomas?

When should one excise a mole?

Change in

Major
1. Size
2. Shape
3. Colour

Minor
4. Diameter >7mm
5. Inflammation
6. Oozing / bleeding
7. Itch / odd sensation

Any lesion with 1 major feature should be considered for EXCISION.

13

What are the features of Rosacea?
How may you differentiate symptoms and features of Rosacea from SLE?

Facial redness
Telangiectasias
Worse with sun, hot spicy foods, alcohol
No comedones (unlike acne vulgaris)

Dx from SLE by
- Triggers
- photosensitivity
- oral ulcers
- discoid lesions
- malar rash

14

Which part of the body does atopic dermatitis spare?

The nose

Unlike rosacea or acne vulgaris which does affect nose

15

What are the features of eczematous lesions?

Itchy
erythematous
cracked and dry
Weeping clear fluid
Scaly

16

Which sites does eczema affect in todlers and babies?

Cheeks
Scalp
Extensor surfaces

17

Which sites does eczema affect children/adolescents?

neck
wrists
elbows
ankles

18

Which sites does eczema affect in adults?

hands
wrists
ankles
face
feet

19

Which bacterial infections does actopic dermatitis make people succeptible to?

Staph
GAS

20

What is the treatment and management of atopic dermatitis?

Avoid triggers (e.g. dry skin, irritants)
Skin care (tepid baths, mild soaps, moisturisers)
Acute inflammation - topical steroid, antihistamines

21

What is the steps up the steroid cream ladder?

HEBD

Hydrocortisone (0.5% or 1%)
Eumovate
Betnovate
Dermovate

22

What are some causes of contact dermatitis?

Allergic reaction to an irritant e.g.
- poison ivy
- metal (nickel)
- topical medications
- cosmetics

Irritating chemicals (not an allergy like the above, everyone will react to these with dermatitis)

23

How is contact dermatitis treated?

Low potent steroid on face, higher used elsewhere

Hydrocortisone cream
Eumovate

24

How does seborrheic dermatitis present and where on the body does it usually manifest?

Cradle Cap

- Mild dermatitis caused by fungus
- Scaly, greasy, flakly, itchy, red skin
- Sebaceous glands of skin affected such as nasolabial fold, scalp, hairline, eyelids, eyebrows, central face, ear canals, central chest

25

What is the treatment for seborrheic dermatitis?

Low potency topical steroid
or
Anti-fungal preparation

e.g. Daktacort / Ketoconazole cream or shampoo (good for cradle cap)

26

How may you differentiate irritant diaper dermatitis from candidiasis?

Fungal candidiasis will have satellite lesions and involves skinfolds

Irritant diaper dermatitis is red, erosional and spares the skin folds, mainly affecting convex areas

27

What is the treatment / management for irritant diaper dermatitis?

Barrier creams
Looser nappies / remove nappies
Fix source of problem - i.e. diarrhoea?

28

What is the treatment for urticaria?

What is it usually caused by?

Antihistamines

Allergic reaction to meds / insects / foods

29

What is the cause of psoriasis?

Immune cells trigger hyperproliferative skin and scale

Triggered by infections, therefore more severe in HIV/Immunocompromised

30

What social factors puts someone at increased risk of psoriasis?

Alcohol
Obesity
Smoking
Depression
Metabolic syndrome

31

What nail changes are present in psoriasis?

Onchydodystrophy / Onycholysis
Pitting
Subungual hyperkeratosis

32

What is the treatment for psoriasis?

Topical steroids
Calcipotriene (vit D analog)

Can add:
- phototherapy
- MTX
- acetritin
- cyclosporine

NEVER USE SYSTEMIC STEROIDS!

33

How may you differentiate pemphigus vulgaris and bullous phemphigoid?

Pemphigus vulgaris are superficial bullae that rupture easily

Bullous pemphigoid are deep, tense bullae that do not rupture easily

34

What is erythema nodosum and where on the body is it usually seen?

Inflammatory condition of the fat cells under skin - tender red nodules or bumps

Often on lower legs, WITHOUT ulceration

35

What is the treatment for erythema nodosum?

Treat underlying trigger (infection, abx, OCP, pregnancy) and NSAIDs

36

How may you differentiate Drug Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome from SJS/TEN?

Does not involve the mucous membranes (unlike in SJS/TEN)

37

What are some common drugs that cause DIHS?

Allopurinol
Antibiotics
Anticonvulsants
nsAids

38

What is the treatment for DIHS?

STOP OFFENDING DRUG

Topical steroids and antihistamines

Systemic steroids if severe