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Flashcards in Faculty Exam Deck (48):
1

3-fold definition of medical psychology

Study of behaviors, cognitions and motivations relating to physical and mental health

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Patients usually think of disease when they see a hospital.

Associationism

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Psychology is considered in its role in adapting to new environments.

Functionalism

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When superiors are observing, an inexperienced doctor is likely to make more mistakes in the ER where an experienced doctor is likely to make less mistakes.

Social facilitation

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People undergoing chemotherapy start to feel side effects when pulling into the hospital parking lot.

Classical conditioning

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A doctor should examine a patient and observe test results before looking at the notes from previous physicians.

Group dynamics

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People choose not to go to the dentist because having their teeth drilled into is uncomfortable.

Operant conditioning

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People's best friends are more likely to be in their cul-de-sac. Hospitals are organized so all levels of healthcare interact with each other.

Informal social communication

9

This is why med students tend to set a higher standard for themselves when they begin classes.

Social comparison

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Support groups for people with cancer in the hospital.

Affiliation

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It is important for doctors to recognize wounded warriors as individuals and members of a team.

Individuation and deindividuation

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A doctor you respect is dismissive towards an annoying patient. You do the same.

Social learning theory.

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A soldier thinks, "Only people who are weak need mental healthcare. I'm not weak. I don't need mental healthcare."

Cognitive dissonance

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You are more likely to help a broken-down car on a country road than on the 495.

Social loafing

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Used to determine if a patient is obese due to laziness or lack of access to healthy food.

Attribution

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Persuading a target audience with counter-arguments, credibility, repetition, non-verbal communication, primacy and recency.

Attitude formation and change.

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People tend to overvalue immediate rewards and undervalue delayed rewards.

Behavioral economics

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Benefits of transmission radiography

Low dose, fast, high resolution images

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Drawbacks of transmission radiography

Need 2 views, can't see behind structures

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Benefits of CT

High resolution, fast, can see behind structures

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Drawbacks of CT

Limited soft tissue contrast and higher patient dose

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Most common radioisotope

Tc99m

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Benefits of Nuclear Medicine

Extremely sensitive

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Drawbacks of Nuclear Medicine

Patient dose, requires CT, limited resolution

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How is a signal detected in PET imaging?

A positron and electron annihilate each other and 2 photons are released in opposite directions. Photons are recorded by a sensor.

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Benefits of PET imaging

Highly specific and functional

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Drawbacks of PET imaging

Patient dose, requires CT, limited resolution, expensive

28

T1-weighted MRI

Water is darker and fat is brighter

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T2-weighted MRI

Water is lighter and fat is darker

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Benefits of MRI

Excellent soft tissue contrast, high resolution, images with varying contrast and no ionizing radiation

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Drawbacks of MRI

Expensive, time, metal and low molecular imaging

32

3 types of leadership

Authoritarian, Laissez Faire, Democratic

33

This is the reason sound is measured in log increments.

Psychophysics. We perceive the stimulus differently at different levels.

34

Modern assembly line's impact on psychology

Psychology's purpose is to perceive, conceive, distinguish, remember and finally shorten reaction time

35

People are more likely to remember the 1st and last note of a song.

Primacy and recency

36

System 1 memory

Thinking fast

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System 2 membory

Thinking slow

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Our actions motivate us to fulfill our need to fulfill.

Drive theory

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A good pat on the back increases behavior repetition

Reinforcement theory

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Motivations based on goals in our psychological world drives our actions

Field theory

41

People are more likely to engage in a behavior if they are rewarded prior to engaging in it.

Incentive theory

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People with these disorders manipulate and exploit others.

Anti-social personality disorders

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People with these disorders overreact to draw attention to themselves

Histronic personality disorders

44

Steps to resolving an ethical dilemma

1. Recognize it exists 2. Determine what questions to ask 3. Determine what decisions should be made 4. Imagine cases that could involve your similar dilemma 5. How can this be prevented in the future 6. Do I have any personal experiences that influenced my analysis 7. Assess how your decision will affect your doctor-patient relationships

45

When you encounter an ethical dilemma, you find two cases at each end of the spectrum and compare the consequences in your analysis of your decision.

Casuistry

46

A patient doesn't believe a doctor when he tells her the test results are fine but does not look at her while doing so.

Care perspective

47

Getting to know your patient is essential in making a correct ethical decision.

Narrative ethics

48

Making sure a nurse is taken care of while performing an abortion.

Feminist ethics. Focuses on people involved in, but not at the center of the decision.