Heart Failure Flashcards Preview

Pharm III > Heart Failure > Flashcards

Flashcards in Heart Failure Deck (40)
Loading flashcards...
1

Factors affecting SV

contractility, filling pressure (preload) and peripheral resistance (afterload)

2

Definition of heart failure

inability of the heart to pump sufficient blood to meet the metabolic demands of the body. Decreased mechanical efficiency (decreased contractility)

3

A decrease in stroke volume will have what effect on the heart?

Leads to dilation (increased vent V) and hypertrophy (increased ventricular mass). Helps increases stroke volume

4

What is the flow of heart failure? Heart failure leds to a decreased CO which leads to....

an increase in sympathetic NS which leads to an increase in HR, preload, afterload and Ang II. The last three lead to an increase in blood V.

5

What is maladaptive remodeling?

alteration in dimension/shape in response to hemodynamic stress/injury in association with neurohormonal activation. (myocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis, fibroblast proliferation and oxidative stress)

6

What factors lead to maladaptive remodeling? (specifically)

Ang II, catecholamines, aldosterone, cytokines, ect.

7

What part of the heart failure flow does inotropi agents effect?

decrease CO

8

What inotropic agent do we need to know?

Digoxin (a cardiac glycoside), Dobutamine, Milrinone

9

What effect does Digoxin have on the heart?

increased contractility which leads to an increased stroke V. Decreases HR by an increase in vagal tone and slowing of AV conduction

10

What is the mechanism of Digoxin?

inhibits the Na-K-ATPase, increases intracellular Ca

11

What is the negative side to Digoxin?

A long half life (36 hours) and a low therapeutic index

12

What are the toxicities of cardiac glycosides?

N&V, diarrhea, visual changes.
arrhythmias (bradycardia, AV block, ventricular premature beats/tachycardia)

13

What kind of drug is dobutamine?

A dopamine derivative inotropic agent

14

What is dobutamine's mechanism?

beta (low dose) and alpha (high dose) agonist

15

What is dobutamine's mechanism?

Increases contractility which increases CO.
Causes tachycardia, but less so then isopropterenol.

16

When would you use docutamine? What is its effect on martaility of HF?

As a short term cardiac supper (IV only), pts will develop a tolerance to it.
It is proarrhythmic.
Only txs the side effects, doesn't effect mortaility of HF.

17

What is the mechanism of Milrinone?

It is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. PDE inactivates cAMP so by inhibiting PDE it increases cAMP.

18

What effect does Milrinone have?

It increases contractility, SV and decreases afterload (vasodilation)

19

What are the limitations of Milrinone?

hypotesion, proarrhythmia, doesn't effect mortality of HF

20

What are the classes of neurohormonal modulators that we need to know?

Ang II modifiers, beta blockers, aldosterone antagonists and vasodilators.

21

What are the three Ang II modifiers and what class of drug do they belong?

Captopril and Enalapril (ACE inhibitors) and Losartan (ANG II receptor blockers).

22

What are the mechanisms for Ang II modifiers?

1. decrease afterload (vasodilation) increases SV
2. venodilation leads to a decreased preload which leads to a in congestion
3. a decrease in aldosterone leads to a decrease in blood volume
4. slows progression of hypertrophy/remodeling

23

What effect does ANG II modifiers have on the mortality of HF?

they decrease it because they slow the progression of hypertrophy and remodeling.

24

What are the adverse effects of Ang II modifiers (2 for the group, 2 for ACE inhibitors specifically)

Hypotension (1st dose, salt depleted), fetopathic potential (renal toxicity).
ACE inhibitor: cough and angioedema

25

What beta blockers do we need to know for HF?

metoprolol (beta 1 selective)
Carvedilol (beta-nonselective, alpha-1-antigonist)

26

How do beta blockers need to be dosed in acute situations?

Need to be given in low doses because they will lower HR and ejection fraction.

27

What is the chronic effect of beta blockers?

Gradual increase in the dose will eventually lead to an increased EF.

28

What is the antiarrhythmic effect of beta blockers?

blockade of toxic catecholamine effects

29

What effect does beta blockers have on the mortality of HF?

Slows the progression of vent hypertrophy/remodeling. Decreases mortality.

30

What are the limitations and adverse effects of betablockers?

asthma (nonselective blockers/bronchospasm) and diabetes (prolongation of hypoglycemia).
Bradycardia (SA and AV nodal) and insomnia/nightmares.

31

What aldosterone antagonist do we need to know?

Spironolactone

32

What is the mechanism of spironolactone?

blocks minneralcorticoid receptor, deceases Na and water reabsorption, decrease K excretion, reduces sympathetic tone, decrease LV remodeling, increases EF, decreases apoptosis and fibrosis. Maybe reduces mortality.

33

What are the limitations of spironolactone?

hyperkalemia and male impotence.

34

What vasodilators do we need to know for HF?

nitroglycerin and hydralazine

35

What is the mechanism of nitro?

it dilates veins > arterioles (NO).

36

What effect does nitro have?

decreases preload and thus decreases filling pressure and congestion.

37

What is the limitation of vasodilators?

hypotension

38

What is the mechanism of Hydralazine?

dilator of arterioles > veins (NO)

39

What effect does hydralazine have?

decreases TPR = decrease in afterload = increase in SV

40

Can nitro and hydralazine be used in combination?

yes